User:Trödel

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From the Front Page of Wikipedia

Today's featured article

Lanny McDonald 2010.jpg
Lanny McDonald (born 1953) is a former professional ice hockey player for the Toronto Maple Leafs, Colorado Rockies and Calgary Flames of the National Hockey League (NHL). He played over 1,100 games during a 16-year career, scoring exactly 500 goals and over 1,000 points. His total of 66 goals in 1982–83 remains the Flames' franchise record. McDonald established himself as an offensive forward with three consecutive 40-goal seasons in Toronto in the mid-1970s. He played parts of three seasons in Denver before he was sent to Calgary in 1981 where he spent the remainder of his career. He co-captained the Flames to a Stanley Cup championship in his final season of 1988–89. McDonald won the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy for dedication and sportsmanship in 1983 and in 1988 was named the inaugural winner of the King Clancy Memorial Trophy for his leadership and humanitarian presence, in particular through his long association with the Special Olympics. Internationally, he represented Team Canada as a player on two occasions and in a management role three times. McDonald was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1992 and the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame in 1993. The Flames retired his uniform number 9 in 1990. (Full article...)

Recently featured: Ralph Richardson – Batman: Arkham City – Peasants' Revolt

Today's featured picture

Albers projection

The Albers projection is a conic, equal area map projection, named after Heinrich C. Albers, that uses two standard parallels. Although scale and shape are not preserved, distortion is minimal between the standard parallels. This map is used by such agencies as the United States Geological Survey, the United States Census Bureau, and the governments of British Columbia and Yukon.

Map: Strebe, using Geocart

Yesterday's featured picture

Bharata Natyam

Bharata Natyam is a classical Indian dance which originated from the temples of Tamil Nadu and is practiced today by male and female dancers all over the world. This dance is a modern attempt to reconstruct the Sadir of the temple dancers, a form which can be traced back to the beginning of the common era. Shiva is considered the god of this dance form, which is performed here by Ranjitha Shivanna.

Photograph: Augustus Binu

Featured Picture from Day before Yesterday

Lindau harbor

The entrance to the harbor of Lindau, Bavaria, Germany, a major town and island in the international Lake Constance. The current harbor in Lindau was built in the mid-19th century, together with the Bavarian Lion (left) and the Lindau Lighthouse (right). The harbor entrance serves as a tourist attraction.

Photograph: Julian Herzog

Featured Picture from Two Days before Yesterday

Artificial cranial deformation

The skull of a proto-Nazcan person (c. 200-100 BC), which has been artificially shaped. In the proto-Nazcan culture, this was achieved by binding a cushion to an infant's forehead and a board to the back of the head, creating an elongated shape. It is unknown why this was done; theories suggest that this was meant to create an ethnic identity, form the individual into a social being, or illustrate social status.

Photograph: Didier Descouens
Religion in Society

There is a great disconnect between how athiests and religionist view the proper place for religion in the public square. Briefly, atheists (usually) want no religion in the public square, and religionists want equal access (non-denominational) to the public square and view athiesm as just one other "religion" that needs access.

Wikipedia's Reputation

I've been thinking about this key principle: "[What] reliable sources ... have in common is process and approval between document creation and publication." This is also the key to Wikipedia's reliability and reputation. The core principles of neutrality and verifiability along with the standards for articles (featured/good/etc) and the implicit approval of every person who reads an article and makes no changes to it.

Intellectual Property

We (Americans) often "borrow" other people's intellectual property because the transaction method (i.e. limited use permission) does not exist and can not be created without the transaction cost exceeding the value of the permission (which is close to $0.00 in most cases) so we keep using other's work, and they don't sue us.

Interesting Discussions

TithingTheologyChristian ScienceChildren of RecordWhy Edit is on IntroductionThe Bible and BoM

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