User:TwilightPhoenix/EVOSandbox

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This is a sandbox for the article Escape Velocity Override for potential major edits. This is not an actual article.

Escape Velocity Override
Developer(s) Ambrosia Software
Publisher(s) Ambrosia Software
Platform(s) Mac OS
Release date(s) 1998
Genre(s) RPG
Mode(s) single player

Escape Velocity Override is a Macintosh-only role-playing game that takes place in space. It is the sequel to Escape Velocity, a game developed by Ambrosia Software. It features an entirely new story line with a much bigger universe and many more governments and missions than the first, and an extended version of the original game engine.

Although Escape Velocity and EV Override are written for the classic Mac OS, and therefore run natively only on Mac OS 9 and earlier, plug-ins for EV Nova that simulate the first two titles using the new game's engine have been released with Ambrosia's authorisation. Because EV Override was ported to EV Nova, which runs natively on both Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows, virtually anyone can now play the stories of all three games regardless of their operating system.

Gameplay[edit]

The player controls a ship represented from a birds-eye point of view in third person. Most of the game takes place within this view, where the player can interact with ships and stellar objects within the star system they are presently in. There are over a hundred star systems in the game all connected to one another by a series of hyperlanes. The player can utilize the lanes to perform a hyper-jump to a nearby system, which takes one to three days depending on their ship's mass.

Players are capable of landing at planets, stations, and some other stellar objects. Here, if the location is inhabited, they can access a mission computer to take jobs, purchase new ships, trade commodities, refuel, customize their ship with various weapons and outfits, and go to a spaceport bar to hire escorts, watch the news, gamble, and sometimes receive more unique missions. Not all services are available at all locations. However, all inhabited locations have a mission computer and refueling option, and all stellar objects that can be landed on will repair the player's shields and armor for free.

The star systems of Override are controlled by various governments, each with a different disposition towards the player. Most start off as neutral with the player, though some may restrict access to their planets and stations and still others may be openly hostile and attack the player on sight. The player, however, can change their status with various governments. Taking missions for a government, attacking their enemies, and destroying pirates boosts status, whereas helping opposing governments, attacking a government's and their ally's ships, and pirating civilians will lower their legal rating. Also, affecting the legal status of one government will directly affect those of its allies and inversely affect its enemies. Having a high legal rating will give the player access to missions for that government (which, in turn, can unlock that government's ships and outfits). On the other hand, a low legal status will cause the government to restrict access to their ports and even cause them to attack the player on sight.

Like its predecessor, EV Override is fully open-ended and does not force the player to get involved in any of the game's plots, nor does it make a player continue a plot once they're in it. Players have the option to take the storylines and cause their actions to have a major impact on the galaxy. On the other hand, they can also simply become a commodity trader, cargo runner, or pirate and leave the galaxy to fend for itself. Players can purchase (or capture) and outfit many ships in the game as they see fit, allowing for many methods and styles for playing the game. Also, once they become powerful enough, players also have the option of forcing worlds to pay them daily tribute by destroying their defense fleets. This, however, will have serious drops in their legal status and will cause bounty hunters to start chasing them.

Plot[edit]

Reception[edit]

Reviews
Publication Response
MacGamer's Ledge 90% [1]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Greg Weston (2002-6-15). "Escape Velocity Override". MacGamer. Retrieved 2007-12-29.  Check date values in: |date= (help)

External links[edit]


Category:1998 video games Category:Role-playing video games Category:Escape Velocity Category:Ambrosia Software games Category:Mac OS-only games


This sandbox is a rough draft. If you have any suggestions for improvement, feel free to offer them or make the edits. Though if you do edit, your changes may be reverted without warning.


Old Article[edit]

This is the old stuff I'm trying to replace. Please do not edit it, as I am using it for reference to see what I need to include.


Lead[edit]

Escape Velocity Override is a Macintosh-only role-playing game that takes place in space. It is the sequel to Escape Velocity, a game developed by Ambrosia Software. It features an entirely new story line with a much bigger universe and many more governments and missions than the first, and an extended version of the original game engine.

The game involves the player as an independent space captain making his way through the galaxy. There are several governments which control different sectors of the galaxy: United Earth at the south of the known galaxy, the Voinians to the west, the Miranu to the north, and the Strand races: the Igadzra, Zidagar, and Azdgari to the east. The player has the choice of aiding any of these governments through doing missions and completing different plotlines. However, like the rest of the Escape Velocity series, it has no real ending and the player can play the game without ever getting involved in the politics of the galaxy.

Although Escape Velocity and EV Override are written for the classic Mac OS, and therefore run natively only on Mac OS 9 and earlier, plug-ins for EV Nova that simulate the first two titles using the new game's engine have been released with Ambrosia's authorisation. Because EV Nova runs natively on both Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows, virtually anyone can now play the stories of all three games regardless of their operating system.

Gameplay[edit]

The player starts out in United Earth territory with a small shuttlecraft, the weakest ship in the game. The player can land on planets, where he can buy different equipment and weapons for his ship, buy a new ship, buy and sell commodities on the Commodities Market, and get missions in either the Mission Computer or the Spaceport Bar. Missions generally available in the Mission Computer are simple shipments and cargo runs that pay a fair amount of money, whereas missions in the Spaceport Bar are generally connected to a set of missions or a story line that will change the galaxy should you choose to accept.

The player can travel to different systems in the galaxy, controlled by different governments, each with their own planets. Missions usually involve traveling to other systems and either landing on a planet or destroying an enemy fleet or ship. In EV Override, some systems change in response to missions, and often after completing one of the main plotlines systems will have been conquered and/or destroyed.

One of the principles of the Escape Velocity series is that the player does not have to participate in special missions or politics. Any player can make a living by simply doing the missions in the mission computer or buying and selling commodities. Though many of the ships in the galaxy are only available after completing different sets of missions, there are a huge selection of ships available to the player, allowing a simple trader to get stronger and richer as he becomes more powerful. Players who are powerful enough can even force planets to pay tribute by defeating their defence fleets (though this will, of course, render them highly unpopular with the planets' governments and allies).