User:Vietnamesepresident/Gallery

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A monthly archive of Wikipedia's featured pictures


These featured pictures previously appeared (or shall appear) as Picture of the day as scheduled below. You can add the automatically updating Picture of the day to your userpage or talk page using {{pic of the day}} (text version) or {{POTD}} (short version). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.


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January 1 - Sat

Picture of the day
Parliament House, Canberra

A panoramic view of Parliament House, the meeting facility of the Parliament of Australia located in Canberra, the capital of Australia. At the time of the completion in 1988, it was the most expensive building in the Southern Hemisphere at over AU$1.1 billion. The building contains 4,700 rooms and many areas are open to the public. From above, it appears as two boomerangs enclosed within a circle. Much of the building is underground, located beneath Capital Hill.

Photo: John O'Neill
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January 2 - Sun

Picture of the day
Pink Knotweed

A flower and leaves of a Pink Knotweed (Persicaria capitata), an ornamental plant native to Asia. It is a prostrate herb with leaves that are 1–6 cm (0.4–2.4 in) long and 7–30 mm (0.3–1.2 in) wide, and spikes that are 5–10 mm (0.2–0.4 in) long and 5–7 mm (0.2–0.3 in) in diameter.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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January 3 - Mon

Picture of the day
An Ideal Husband

A scene from Oscar Wilde's 1895 play An Ideal Husband, originally published in a 1901 collected edition of Wilde's works. The comedy, which opened January 3, 1896, at the Haymarket Theatre in London, revolves around blackmail and political corruption, and touches on the themes of public and private honour. It has been adapted into television, radio/audio, and three films. The published version differs slightly from the performed play, for Wilde added many passages and cut others. Prominent additions included written stage directions and character descriptions. Wilde was a leader in the effort to make plays accessible to the reading public.

Artist: Unknown; Restoration: Adam Cuerden
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January 4 - Tue

Picture of the day
Scene from The Wicked World

The climactic scene from Act III of The Wicked World (1873), a blank verse play by W. S. Gilbert about how female fairies cope with a sudden introduction to them of men and "mortal love". This is one of several "fairy comedies" by Gilbert, and it established him as a writer of wide range, propelling him beyond the burlesques he had produced in his early career, and leading towards his famous Savoy operas.

Illustration: D. H. Friston; Restoration: Adam Cuerden
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January 5 - Wed

Picture of the day
Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

An 1880s poster for Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, a novella by Robert Louis Stevenson known for its vivid portrayal of a split personality, wherein within the same person there is both an apparently good and an evil personality, quite distinct from each other. It was a huge success, with over 40,000 copies sold in the first six months after publication.

Poster: National Prtg. & Engr. Co.; Restoration: PLW
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January 6 - Thu

Picture of the day
Ensign wasp

Evania appendigaster is a species of ensign wasp, a family of parasitoid wasps whose larvae are known to be predatory on cockroaches. However, hosts for 96% of the over 400 species are not yet known, so it is likely that more unusual life histories exist. Ensign wasps are found worldwide, apart from the polar regions.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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January 7 - Fri

Picture of the day
Male Magpie-lark

A male Magpie-lark (Grallina cyanoleuca), a common Australian bird of small to medium size. Like many Australian birds, it was named for its physical similarity to the northern hemisphere birds familiar to European settlers. In fact, it is neither a magpie nor a lark and is not particularly closely related to either.

Photo: Fir0002
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January 8 - Sat

Picture of the day
Fleet Air Arm helicopter

A Eurocopter AS350 "Squirrel" helicopter flown by 723 Squadron of the Fleet Air Arm (FAA), the section of the Royal Australian Navy responsible for the operation of aircraft. The FAA is currently an all-helicopter force, operating four separate models in the anti-submarine warfare and maritime support roles.

Photo: Fir0002
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January 9 - Sun

Picture of the day
Walter Johnson and Calvin Coolidge

U.S. President Calvin Coolidge shaking hands with baseball player Walter Johnson and presenting him with a "diploma" for the Washington Senators winning the 1924 American League championship. Johnson was one of the most accomplished pitchers in Major League Baseball history. He established several pitching records, some of which remain unbroken, including career shutouts (110) and most consecutive seasons leading the league in strikeouts (8).

Photo: National Photo Company; Restoration: Staxringold
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January 10 - Mon

Picture of the day
Opal

A polished sample of opal, a mineraloid gemstone, that occurs in the fissures of almost any kind of rock, being most commonly found with limonite, sandstone, rhyolite, marl, and basalt. Opal comes in a wide variety of colors, with red against black being the most rare, whereas white and green are the most common.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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January 11 - Tue

Picture of the day
Gunnar Sønsteby

Gunnar Sønsteby (born January 11, 1918), known by the code names of Kjakan (The Chin) and No. 24, was a member of the Norwegian resistance during World War II. He is the most decorated person in Norway, and the only one to have been awarded the War Cross with three swords. He was the head of the Norwegian Independent Company 1 group, which committed numerous acts of sabotage against the Nazi regime. This put him high on the Gestapo's most wanted list, but he was never captured. Now in his 90s, he still gives frequent talks about his wartime experiences.

Photo credit: Arne Flaaten
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January 12 - Wed

Picture of the day
Luculia gratissima

Flowers of Luculia gratissima, a species of shrub in the small genus Luculia, all of which are native to eastern South Asia and southern East Asia. The plants have large leaves from 20 to 35 cm (8 to 14 in) with prominent veins carried in opposite pairs and with a terminal of an umbel or corymb of tubular/open ended white, pink or creamy flowers with five spreading petals.

Photo: JJ Harrison
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January 13 - Thu

Picture of the day
Spanish grant of arms

A Grant of Arms by Philip II of Spain to Alonso de Mesa and Hernando de Mesa, signed 25 November 1566. In Spanish heraldry, coats of arms were granted based almost entirely on military service, which made it possible for commoners to join the ranks of the Spanish nobility. Also unique to Spain was that titles could be inherited through females and via illegitimacy.

Image: Royal Household of Spain; Restoration: Lise Broer
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January 14 - Fri

Picture of the day
Inner tubing

A person engaged in tubing (or "inner tubing"), the recreational activity of riding an inner tube, either on water, snow, or through the air. Tubing on water generally consists of two forms: free-floating and towed (shown here). In the latter, one or more riders tether their tubes to a powered watercraft, which tows them along the surface of the water.

Photo: Peter Opatrny
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January 15 - Sat

Picture of the day
Jimmy Wales

Jimmy Wales is the co-founder of the online encyclopedia Wikipedia, along with Larry Sanger and others. Wikipedia succeeded an earlier attempt at an encyclopedia called Nupedia, but Nupedia grew slowly because of its onerous submission format, which required articles to be peer reviewed. Sanger was then introduced to the concept of a wiki, and thus Wikipedia was born. Wales continues to serve on the Board of Trustees of the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation, and he also co-founded Wikia, a for-profit wiki hosting site.

Photo: Manuel Archain
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January 16 - Sun

Picture of the day
Globe Skimmer

The Globe Skimmer (Pantala flavescens) is the most widespread dragonfly species on the planet, found between about the 40th parallels of latitude, or where the annual mean temperature is above 20 °C (68 °F), except in Europe where there are only occasional sightings.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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January 17 - Mon

Picture of the day
Benjamin Franklin

A painting of Benjamin Franklin (1706–1790), one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, in London, 1767, wearing a blue suit with elaborate gold braid and buttons, a far cry from the simple dress he affected when he served as ambassador to France in later years. During his time in London, Franklin was the leading voice of American interests in England. He wrote popular essays on behalf of the colonies and was instrumental in securing the repeal of the 1765 Stamp Act. The painting was done by David Martin and is currently on display in the White House. The bust on the left side is of Isaac Newton.

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January 18 - Tue

Picture of the day
Rufous Whistler

The Rufous Whistler (Pachycephala rufiventris, male shown here) is a species of whistler found in New Caledonia, Papua New Guinea, and throughout Australia (with the exception of Tasmania). Predominantly a reddish-brown and grey bird, it has a variety of musical calls.

Photo: Fir0002
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January 19 - Wed

Picture of the day
Meerkat

The meerkat (Suricata suricatta) is a small member of the mongoose family native to the Kalahari Desert of southern Africa. They are social animals, living underground in groups of 20 to 50 members. Although the name means "lake cat" in Dutch, meerkats are not cats, nor are they attracted to lakes.

Photo: Fir0002
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January 20 - Thu

Picture of the day
Malachite

A sample of malachite, a green copper carbonate mineral that crystallizes in the monoclinic crystal system. It is typically associated with copper deposits around limestone, and is often found together with azurite. Malachite was used as a mineral pigment in green paints from antiquity until about 1800, and is still used today for decorative purposes and to make jewelry.

Photo: JJ Harrison
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January 21 - Fri

Picture of the day
Danny Lee Wynter

Danny Lee Wynter is an English actor of Italian and Jamaican descent. He has starred in several theatre productions, including King Lear, Henry IV, Part 1 and Henry IV, Part 2, all at Shakespeare's Globe. He has also had guest appearances in various television programmes such as Luther, Trial & Retribution, and Holby City. Lee Wynter lives and works in London.

Photo: Johan Persson
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January 22 - Sat

Picture of the day
Canna lily

Flowers of a canna lily hybrid. Canna lilies are members of the genus Canna. They are not true lilies, and are more closely related to the other plant families in the order Zingiberales, such as the gingers, bananas, marantas, heliconias, and strelitzias. There are nineteen known species and numerous cultivars, all of which have large, attractive foliage, making it a popular garden plant. In addition, it is one of the world's richest starch sources, and as such is used in agriculture.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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January 23 - Sun

Picture of the day
Zack Greinke

Zack Greinke is a pitcher for the Major League Baseball team Milwaukee Brewers. He began his career with the Kansas City Royals (as pictured here), during which time he won the American League Cy Young Award, given to the league's best pitcher. In December 2010, Greinke asked to be traded, saying he was not motivated to play for a rebuilding team.

Photo: Keith Allison
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January 24 - Mon

Picture of the day
Bronx Community College library

The library of Bronx Community College in 1904, when the campus was part of New York University, located in the University Heights neighborhood of The Bronx. It was designed in the Neo-Renaissance style by Stanford White. Behind the library can be seen the Hall of Fame for Great Americans, the first hall of fame in the United States.

Photo: Detroit Photographic Co.; Restoration: Lise Broer
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January 25 - Tue

Picture of the day
Train station photo by Gustave Le Gray

A mid-1800s photo of a train station with train and coal depot, taken by Gustave Le Gray, "the most important French photographer of the nineteenth century" because of his technical innovations in the still-new medium of photography and his role as the teacher of other noted photographers. Two of his photographs were sold in 1999, setting world records for most expensive single photograph ever sold at auction.

Restoration: Lise Broer
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January 26 - Wed

Picture of the day
Satellite image of Australia

The geography of Australia, the world's smallest continent, encompasses a wide variety of biogeographic regions. By surface area, it is the sixth-largest country in the world, but as can be seen in this composite satellite image, much of the interior is arid desert. The vast majority of the human population is concentrated along the eastern and southeastern coasts, and it is the fiftieth most populous nation.

Photo: MODIS (NASA)
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January 27 - Thu

Picture of the day
Flesh fly regurgitating food

A flesh-fly "blowing a bubble". The diet of the flesh-fly is very high in water content. The fly regurgitates the liquid portion of the food, holds it whilst evaporation reduces the water content, and then swallows a much more concentrated food meal without the water content. This continues until an appropriate amount of liquid is left for the fly.

Photo: Fir0002
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January 28 - Fri

Picture of the day
Silver Gull

The Silver Gull (Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae) is the most common gull seen in Australia. It is found throughout the continent, having adapted well to urban environments and thriving around shopping centres and garbage dumps. The Silver Gull should not be confused with the Herring Gull (Larus argentatus), which is called "silver gull" in many other languages.

Photo: Fir0002
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January 29 - Sat

Picture of the day
Promotional poster for Mantra-Rock Dance musical event

The Mantra-Rock Dance musical event took place on January 29, 1967, at the Avalon Ballroom in San Francisco and came to be dubbed as the "ultimate high" and the "major spiritual event" of the hippie era. It was organized by the early followers of the Hare Krishna movement as a promotional and fundraising effort for their first temple on the West Coast. One of them, Harvey W. Cohen, created the Stanley Mouse inspired promotional poster (pictured). The Mantra-Rock Dance featured the Hare Krishna founder Bhaktivedanta Swami, the countercultural ideologues Allen Ginsberg and Timothy Leary, and leading rock groups the Grateful Dead, Moby Grape, and Janis Joplin with Big Brother and the Holding Company. The event caused the Hare Krishna mantra to be adopted by all levels of the counterculture as a "loose commonality" and a viable alternative to drugs.

Artist: Harvey W. Cohen
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January 30 - Sun

Picture of the day
Synthetic gold crystal

A sample of pure synthetic crystals of gold , made by the chemical transport reaction in chlorine gas. Gold is a precious metal used in jewelry, coins, and industrial uses such as dentistry and electronics. It is malleable and ductile, and does not oxidize in air or water.

Photo: Alchemist-hp
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January 31 - Mon

Picture of the day
Sunflower

Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) are large flowering plants native to the Americas. They most commonly grow to heights between 1.5 and 3.5 m (5 and 11 ft), although the tallest known sunflower reached 12 m (39 ft) high. The large inflorescence is composed of a flower head (or "composite flower") of numerous florets (small flowers) crowded together. The florets within the sunflower's cluster are arranged in a spiral pattern and will mature into seeds. The seeds are used as snack food, expeller pressed into sunflower oil, made into sunflower butter (a peanut butter alternative), or milled into flour.

Photo: Fir0002
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December 1 - Wed

Picture of the day
Azurite

Azurite is a soft, deep blue copper mineral produced by weathering of copper ore deposits. Its primary use is for pigment: it gives a wide range of blues depending on the degree of fineness to which it was ground and its basic content of copper carbonate. Azurite is easily confused with lapis lazuli, another blue stone composed primarily of a different mineral, lazurite.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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December 2 - Thu

Picture of the day
William Henry Smith in Punch

"Our New 'First Lord' at Sea", an 1877 editorial cartoon from Punch mocking the appointment of William Henry Smith (right) as First Lord of the Admiralty, the governor of the Royal Navy of the United Kingdom. Smith had been a household name thanks to the W H Smith chain of booksellers and newsagents, and he had been a Member of Parliament for the previous ten years, but he had no naval or even military experience whatsoever. The following year, Gilbert and Sullivan's H.M.S. Pinafore would satirise him on similar grounds, and he became known as "Pinafore Smith" throughout the course of his three years in the post.

Artist: John Tenniel; Restoration: Adam Cuerden
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December 3 - Fri

Picture of the day
Gonia capitata close-up

A macro view of a Gonia capitata fly feeding on honey, showing its proboscis and pedipalps (the two appendages protruding from the proboscis), two types of insect mouthparts. The proboscis actually comprises the labium, a quadrupedal structure, and a sponge-like labellum at the end. Flies eat solid food by secreting saliva and dabbing it over the food item. As the saliva dissolves the food, the solution is then drawn up into the mouth as a liquid. The labellum's surface is covered by minute food channels which form a tube leading to the esophagus, and food is drawn up the channels by capillary action.

Photo: Richard Bartz
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December 4 - Sat

Picture of the day
Amanita muscaria

Two immature Amanita muscaria mushrooms, a poisonous and psychoactive basidiomycete fungus found throughout the world. Its main psychoactive constituent is the compound muscimol, an alkaloid that occurs naturally in Amanita species. It was used as an intoxicant and entheogen by the peoples of Siberia and has a religious significance in these cultures.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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December 5 - Sun

Picture of the day
Abutilon × hybridum flower

The flower of a Abutilon × hybridum 'Patrick Synge' cultivar, a hybrid shrub of unknown parentage. The common name "Chinese Lantern" is often used, though the same name is also applied to Physalis alkekengi. It is a popular group of hybrids that are semi-tropical, frost-tender shrubs typically growing 2–3 m (7–10 ft) tall. The lantern-like buds open to solitary, pendulous, bell- to cup-shaped flowers to 8 cm (3 in) diameter with five overlapping petals and significant staminal columns typical of the mallow family. Flowers come in red, pink, yellow, white and pastel shades. Lobed, maple-like, light green leaves are often variegated with white and yellow.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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December 6 - Mon

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Anthophora sp. bee

A female bee of the Anthophora genus, with its tongue extended to take in water or aphid secretions. Anthophora comprises over 450 species worldwide, being most abundant and diverse in the Holarctic and African biogeographic regions.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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December 7 - Tue

Picture of the day
Derwentwater

A panoramic view of the northern shore of Derwentwater, one of the principal bodies of water in the Lake District in North West England, as seen from near Keswick. The lake measures approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) long by 1 mile (1.6 km) wide, with a depth of about 72 feet (21.9 m). Derwentwater is a popular tourist destination, especially for recreational walking, and there is an extensive network of footpaths within the hills and woods surrounding the lake.

Photo: David Iliff
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December 8 - Wed

Picture of the day
Dún Laoghaire in the 1890s

An 1890s photochrom print of Dún Laoghaire (then known as Kingstown), a suburban seaside town and county town of Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County, in Ireland. A major port of entry from Great Britain, the town is situated about 12 km (7.5 mi) south of Dublin city centre. The town's name derives from a fort ("Dún" in Irish) built by Laoghaire, a 5th century High King of Ireland.

Image: Detroit Publishing Co.; Restoration: A. Cuerden
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December 9 - Thu

Picture of the day
Pacific Black Duck

The Pacific Black Duck (Anas superciliosa) is a dabbling duck found throughout much of the southwestern Pacific. It has a dark body, and a paler head with a dark crown and facial stripes, with a green speculum and pale underwing. The size range is 54–61 cm (21–24 in), with males being slightly larger than females.

Photo: Fir0002
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December 10 - Fri

Picture of the day
Scene from Rob Roy

A scene from Sir Walter Scott's 1817 historical novel Rob Roy, which tells the story of Frank Osbaldistone, the son of an English merchant who travels to Scotland to collect a debt stolen from his father. On the way he encounters the larger-than-life title character of Robert Roy MacGregor. Though Rob Roy is not the lead character (in fact the narrative does not move to Scotland until halfway through the book) his personality and actions are key to the story's development. The novel is a brutally realistic depiction of the social conditions in Highland and Lowland Scotland in the early 18th century.

Engraving: Dalziel Brothers; Restoration: Adam Cuerden
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December 11 - Sat

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Gawthorpe Hall

Gawthorpe Hall is an Elizabethan house in Padiham, in the borough of Burnley, Lancashire, England. It was originally a pele tower, a strong square structure built in the 14th century as a defence against the invading Scots. Around 1600 a Jacobean mansion was dovetailed around the pele, but in 1850 Sir Charles Barry, who later designed the Houses of Parliament, redesigned it to its current state.

Photo: Childzy
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December 12 - Sun

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Smoky quartz

Smoky quartz is a brown to black variety of quartz. It goes by various names, depending on the colour: a dark-brown to black opaque variety is called "morion"; a yellow-brown variety from Scotland is known as "cairngorm", the colour being a result of ferric oxide impurity.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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December 13 - Mon

Picture of the day
Internal spider anatomy

The internal anatomy of a typical female two-lunged spider. The yellow items signify portions of the digestive system, red indicates the circulatory system, blue is the nervous system, pink is the respiratory system, and purple is the reproductive system. Lastly, the spinnerets and poison glands are shown in green.

Image: Ryan Wilson, after John Henry Comstock
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December 14 - Tue

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Karkalla flower

The flower of a Karkalla (Carpobrotus rossii), a succulent coastal groundcover plant native to southern Australia. Australian Aborigines traditionally eat the globular purplish-red fruit, fresh and dried. The salty leaves are also reported to be eaten with meat.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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December 15 - Wed

Picture of the day
Scene from "The Canterville Ghost"

A scene from "The Canterville Ghost", Oscar Wilde's first published story, which is about an American family that moves into a haunted house in England. However, instead of being frightened of the eponymous ghost, they turn the tables and prank him, such as in this scene, where the twin boys have set up a butter-slide, causing the ghost to slip down the staircase. The story satirises both the unrefined tastes of Americans and the determination of the British to guard their traditions.

Artist: Wallace Goldsmith; Restoration: Adam Cuerden
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December 16 - Thu

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Frontispiece to A Memoir of Jane Austen

The frontispiece to A Memoir of Jane Austen, a biography of the author Jane Austen (1775–1817), written by her nephew James Edward Austen-Leigh and published 52 years after her death. Common to biographies written in the Victorian era, it did not attempt to unreservedly tell the story of the author's life, but instead kept much private information from the public. The Memoir generated popular interest in the works of Jane Austen, which only a literary elite had read up until that point. The art for the frontispiece took some liberties with the original painting, softening Austen's features in the Victorian style.

Image: James Andrews, after Cassandra Austen
Restoration: Adam Cuerden/Staxringold

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December 17 - Fri

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White-barred Emperor butterfly

The White-barred Emperor (Charaxes brutus, ssp. natalensis shown here) is a butterfly species native to central and southern Africa. The wingspan is 60–75 mm (2.4–3.0 in) in males and 75–90 mm (3.0–3.5 in) in females. All Charaxes species are tropical Old World butterflies, with the highest diversity in the humid forests around the Indian Ocean, from Africa to Indonesia.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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December 18 - Sat

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Black Currawong

The Black Currawong (Strepera fuliginosa) is a large passerine bird native to Tasmania. One of three currawong species, it is closely related to the butcherbirds and Australian Magpie. It is a large crow-like bird, around 50 cm (20 in) long on average, with yellow irises, a heavy bill, and black plumage with white wing patches. It is similar in appearance to the Clinking Currawong, but the latter has a white rump and larger white wing patches. The Black Currawong is usually found in wetter eucalypt forests, in areas above 200 m (656 ft) altitude, mainly in the Central Highlands, with scattered records elsewhere in Tasmania and the surrounding islands.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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December 19 - Sun

Picture of the day
Semi-submersible oil platform

The semi-submersible oil platform P-51, operated by Brazilian energy company Petrobras, being positioned by tugboats. Semisubs sit on pontoons located under the ocean surface, with the operating deck atop columns, above the sea level. In this manner, they are relatively protected from wave action.

Photo: Agência Brasil
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December 20 - Mon

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Estádio da Luz

The Estádio da Luz in Lisbon, Portugal, is the home stadium of the association football club S.L. Benfica. The stadium, which has a capacity of 65,400, opened in October 2003, and has hosted several major games, including the final of the 2004 European Championship. The name translates to "Stadium of Light", a common theme in Portuguese Catholicism. It replaced an older, larger stadium, also called Estádio da Luz.

Photo: Massimo Catarinella
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December 21 - Tue

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Great Britain snowed under

A satellite photo of Great Britain and part of Ireland showing the extent of snow cover during the winter of 2009–2010, the coldest in Europe since 1981–82. Starting on 16 December 2009 a persistent weather pattern brought cold moist air from the north with systems undergoing cyclogenesis from North American storms moving across the Atlantic Ocean to the west, and saw many parts of Europe experiencing heavy snowfall and record low temperatures.

Photo: Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA
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December 22 - Wed

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Amethyst crystal

Amethyst is a violet variety of quartz often used in jewelry. The color is a result of irradiation which causes the iron ions present as impurities in quartz to rearrange themselves in the crystal lattice. On exposure to heat, the irradiation effects can be partially cancelled and amethyst generally becomes yellow or even green.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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December 23 - Thu

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French marigold

The French marigold (Tagetes patula) is an annual flowering plant in the daisy family. The flowers are used to make food coloring as well as dyes for textiles. The plants are also distilled for their essential oils, which are then used in perfumes, and they are also being investigated for anti-fungal properties.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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December 24 - Fri

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Aida poster

A poster for a 1908 American production of Aida, an opera by Giuseppe Verdi that premiered on December 24, 1871, to great acclaim at the Khedivial Opera House in Cairo, Egypt. However, Verdi was most dissatisfied that the audience consisted of invited dignitaries and critics, but no members of the general public. He therefore considered the European premiere, held at La Scala, Milan, to be its real premiere.

Poster: Otis Lithograph Co; Restoration: Adam Cuerden
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December 25 - Sat

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"Gloria in Excelsis Deo"

An engraving of an angel with the words Gloria in excelsis Deo et in terra pax ("Glory to God in the highest and peace on Earth"), the words angels sang when the birth of Christ was announced to shepherds, as recounted in Luke 2:14. This formed the basis of a doxology which is today known as Gloria in Excelsis Deo. A tradition recorded in the Liber Pontificalis states that Pope Telesphorus used the hymn at the Mass of Christmas Day in the 2nd century A.D., and it is still recited in its entirety in the Byzantine Rite Orthros service. The Gloria has been and still is sung to a wide variety of melodies, modern scholars having catalogued well over two hundred of them.

Image: Dalziel Brothers, after J. R. Clayton
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December 26 - Sun

Picture of the day
Australian Magpie

The Australian Magpie (Cracticus tibicen) is an omnivorous medium-sized passerine bird native to Australia and southern New Guinea. It has been introduced to New Zealand, where it is considered invasive, as well as to the Solomon Islands and Fiji, where it is not. Adults range from 37 to 43 cm (15 to 17 in) in length, with distinctive black and white plumage, red eyes and a solid wedge-shaped bluish-white and black bill. Described as one of Australia's most accomplished songbirds, the Australian Magpie has an array of complex vocalisations.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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December 27 - Mon

Picture of the day
Zebra portrait

A portrait of a Plains Zebra (Equus quagga), the most common and widespread species of zebra. The unique stripes and behaviors of zebras make these among the animals most familiar to people. They can be found in a variety of habitats throughout Sub-Saharan Africa. The name "zebra" comes from the Old Portuguese word zevra which means "wild ass". Zebra stripes are typically vertical on the head, neck, forequarters, and main body, with horizontal stripes at the rear and on the legs of the animal. It was previously believed that zebras were white animals with black stripes. Embryological evidence, however, shows that the animal's background color is black and the white stripes are additions.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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December 28 - Tue

Picture of the day
Face of a yellowjacket queen

The face of a southern yellowjacket (Vespula squamosa) queen. Yellowjacket is the common name in North America for some species of predatory wasps. They can be identified by their distinctive markings, usually black and yellow, small size (similar to a honey bee), their occurrence only in colonies, and a characteristic, rapid, side to side flight pattern prior to landing.

Photo: Thomas Shahan
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December 29 - Wed

Picture of the day
Baa, Baa, Black Sheep

W. W. Denslow's illustration of "Baa, Baa, Black Sheep", a children's nursery rhyme that dates to 1744, when it was published in Tommy Thumb's Pretty Song Book. Since then, the words have remained mostly intact with few changes. The rhyme is sung to a variant of the 1761 French melody Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman, which is also used for "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" and the alphabet song. As with many nursery rhymes, attempts have been made to find origins and meanings for the rhyme, but no theories have been definitively proven. Denslow's illustration accompanied a 1901 edition of Mother Goose.

Restoration: Lise Broer
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December 30 - Thu

Picture of the day
Creedite

A sample of orange-colored creedite, a rare hydroxyl halide mineral that forms from the oxidation of fluorite ore deposits. It occurs as colorless to white to purple monoclinic prismatic crystals.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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December 31 - Fri

Picture of the day
Animation of the knight's tour

The knight's tour is a mathematical problem involving a knight on a chessboard. The knight is placed on the empty board and, moving according to the rules of chess, must visit each square exactly once. A knight's tour is called a closed tour if the knight ends on a square attacking the square from which it began (so that it may tour the board again immediately with the same path). Otherwise the tour is open. The depicted tour is an open tour, with shaded squares denoting where the knight has already visited.

Animation: Ilmari Karonen
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November 1 - Mon

Picture of the day
Tasmanian Native-hen

The Tasmanian Native-hen (Gallinula mortierii) is a flightless rail, one of twelve species of birds endemic to the Australian island of Tasmania, except the southwestern portion. Although flightless, it is capable of running quickly and has been recorded running at speeds up to 30 miles per hour (48 km/h). Fossil records indicate that the Tasmanian Native-hen was found on the Australian mainland until around 4700 years ago. Suggested reasons for its extinction there have included the introduction of the dingo, or an extremely dry period.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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November 2 - Tue

Picture of the day
Boxer Rebellion

Japanese and British troops attack members of the Society of Righteous and Harmonious Fists ("Boxers") at Beijing Castle during the Boxer Rebellion of 1899–1901. The Boxers, angered by foreign imperialist expansion into Qing Dynasty China, had engaged in looting, arson, and killings of foreigners. In 1900, the Empress Dowager Cixi employed the Boxers to attack foreign settlements in Beijing. The uprising was eventually put down by 20,000 troops from the Eight-Nation Alliance.

Artist: Kasai Torajirō; Restoration: Staxringold
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November 3 - Wed

Picture of the day
Pelopidas sp. Grass Skipper

A Grass Skipper butterfly from the genus Pelopidas. With over 2,000 described species, Grass Skippers are the largest subfamily of Skippers, which are named after their quick, darting flight habits.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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November 4 - Thu

Picture of the day
Suttungr

The giant Suttungr threatens some dwarves, in this scene from Norse mythology. In the story, the dwarf brothers Fjalar and Galar had murdered Suttungr's parents. The giant captured the two, as well as some other dwarves, and placed them on a rock that would be submerged by the tide (shown here). The dwarves begged for Suttungr to spare their lives and offered him the magical mead of poetry, which would allow whoever drinks it to have the ability to recite any information and solve any question. The mead was then stolen by Odin and given to the gods and to men gifted in poetry.

Artist: Louis Huard; Restoration: Adam Cuerden
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November 5 - Fri

Picture of the day
Reflector from Conway's Game of Life

An animated image from Conway's Game of Life showing oscillators of varying periods that double as glider reflectors (highlighted in pink), which are patterns that can interact with a spaceship to change its direction of motion, without damage to the reflector patterns themselves.

Image: Simpsons contributor
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November 6 - Sat

Picture of the day
Pied Piper of Hamelin

An illustration by Kate Greenaway that accompanied Robert Browning's version of the Pied Piper of Hamelin, a legend wherein a piper is hired by the town of Hamelin, Germany, to lead rats away with his magic pipe. The town refuses to pay his wages and he retaliates by leading the children of the town away as well.

Restoration: Lise Broer
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November 7 - Sun

Picture of the day
Coral fungus

Clavulinopsis corallinorosacea is a species of coral fungus, so named for their resemblance to aquatic coral. Coral fungi can be similar in appearance to jelly fungi. They are often brightly colored, mostly oranges, yellows, or reds, and usually grow in older mature forests. Some coral fungi are saprotrophic on decaying wood, while others are commensal or even parasitic.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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November 8 - Mon

Picture of the day
Hut of the Chaga people

A traditional hut of the Chaga people, Bantu-speaking indigenous Africans who live on the southern and eastern slopes of Mount Kilimanjaro and Mount Meru, as well as in the Moshi area. In agricultural exports, the Chaga are best known for their Arabica coffee, which is exported to American and European markets, resulting in coffee being a primary cash crop.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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November 9 - Tue

Picture of the day
Little Pied Cormorant

The Little Pied Cormorant (Microcarbo melanoleucos, shown here in wing-drying pose) is a common Australasian waterbird. It is a small short-billed cormorant, measuring 56–58 cm (22–23 in) in length, usually coloured black above and white below with a yellow bill and small crest.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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November 10 - Wed

Picture of the day
Alpine pasqueflower fruit

The fruit of an alpine pasqueflower (Pulsatilla alpina), an alpine plant found in the mountain ranges of central and southern Europe from central Spain to Croatia. It grows between 1,200 and 2,700 m (3,900 and 8,900 ft) above mean sea level and is mildly toxic. A number of subspecies are recognised, based largely on the form and hairiness of the leaves.

Photo: SiameseTurtle
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November 11 - Thu

Picture of the day
Welsh World War I poster

A poster from Wales advertising a fundraising event to support Welsh troops in World War I. The United Kingdom during this period underwent a number of societal changes, mainly due to wartime events: many of the class barriers of Edwardian England were diminished, women were drawn into mainstream employment and were granted suffrage as a result, and increased national sentiment helped to fuel the break up of the British Empire.

Artist: Frank Brangwyn; Restoration: Lise Broer
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November 12 - Fri

Picture of the day
"The Man That Pleased None"

"The Man That Pleased None", from Walter Crane's 1887 illustrated book The Baby's Own Aesop, a collection of Aesop's Fables retold in limerick format. Aesop lived in Ancient Greece between 620 and 560 BCE, and his fables are some of the most well known in the world, remaining a popular choice for moral education of children today. Crane, a member of the Arts and Crafts movement, popularised the child-in-the-garden motifs that would characterise many nursery rhymes and children's stories for decades to come.

Restoration: Lise Broer
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November 13 - Sat

Picture of the day
Darkling beetle

An Alphitobius species of darkling beetle, a large family of beetles found worldwide, containing more than 20,000 species. The larval stages of several species are cultured as feeder insects for captive insectivores, and include the very commonly known mealworms and superworms.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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November 14 - Sun

Picture of the day
Anopterus glandulosus

Anopterus glandulosus (Native Laurel or Tasmanian Laurel) is a species of shrub or small tree in the family Escalloniaceae, native to Tasmania in Australia. It usually occurs as a shrub 2-4 metres high but may occasionally form a tree up to 10m high. The leaves are large, 7–17 cm long and 2–4 cm wide. The white to light pink flowers are about 2 cm across and occur during spring and often again in autumn.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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November 15 - Mon

Picture of the day
Scene from Maritana

Maritana is an opera first produced at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane on 15 November 1845, conducted by its composer, William Vincent Wallace. The opera is in three acts and is based on the play Don César de Bazan by Adolphe d'Ennery and Philippe François Pinel Dumanoir (1806–1865).

Image: The Illustrated London News
Restoration: Adam Cuerden

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November 16 - Tue

Picture of the day
Low Memorial Library

The Low Memorial Library rotunda of Columbia University, an Ivy League university in New York City, c. 1900–10. The building no longer serves as a library, having been converted to administrative purposes when it was supplanted by the larger Butler Library in 1934. However, the building's facade is still etched with the words "The Library of Columbia University," leading many to mistakenly believe that it retains its earlier role. The building was designed in the neoclassical style by the architectural firm of McKim, Mead, and White, which was responsible for the design of much of the campus. It is registered as a National Historic Landmark.

Photo: Detroit Publishing Co.; Restoration: Lise Broer
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November 17 - Wed

Picture of the day
Clapham Common tube station platform

The platform at Clapham Common, a station on London Underground's Northern line. With tracks on either side serving trains moving in opposite directions, this is an example of an island platform. This configuration is popular in the modern railway world, but may present engineering challenges to existing rail lines.

Photo: David Iliff
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November 18 - Thu

Picture of the day
Chestnut Teal

The Chestnut Teal (Anas castanea, male shown here) is an omnivorous dabbling duck found in southern Australia. The male has a distinctive green coloured head and mottled brown body. The female has a brown head and mottled brown body, which is almost identical to a female Grey Teal.

Photo: Fir0002
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November 19 - Fri

Picture of the day
The Knave of Hearts

In the poem "The Queen of Hearts", the titular queen bakes some tarts, which are then stolen by the Knave of Hearts (shown here). The King of Hearts has the Knave punished, so he brings them back and pledges not to steal again. The poem was published anonymously in 1782, along with three lesser-known stanzas, all about characters based on playing cards.

Artist: W. W. Denslow; Restoration: Lise Broer
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November 20 - Sat

Picture of the day
International Space Station

This photo of the International Space Station (ISS) was taken during STS-119, a Space Shuttle mission that delivered and assembled the fourth starboard Integrated Truss Segment, and the final set of solar arrays and batteries to the station. Construction of the ISS is still ongoing and is scheduled to complete in December 2011.

Photo: NASA
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November 21 - Sun

Picture of the day
Dendrites on a silver crystal

A specimen of crystallized silver, electrolytically refined, with dendritic structures. On metals, dendrites are tree-like structures formed as molten metal solidifies. This dendritic growth has large consequences in regards to material properties. For example, smaller dendrites generally lead to higher ductility of the product.

Photo: Alchemist-hp
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November 22 - Mon

Picture of the day
Old panorama of Beirut

A panorama of Beirut in the late 19th century under Ottoman rule. After the collapse of the Ottoman Empire following World War I, Beirut, along with the rest of Lebanon, was placed under the French Mandate. After Lebanon achieved independence on 22 November 1943, Beirut became its capital city.

Photos: Maison Bonfils; Restoration: Banzoo
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November 23 - Tue

Picture of the day
Pindi moth

The Pindi moth (Abantiades latipennis) is endemic to Australia, where the larvae primarily feed on the roots of Eucalyptus trees. Female moths "lay" their eggs by scattering up to 10,000 of them during flight. Larvae then hatch in the leaf litter on the forest floor and begin tunnelling in search of suitable host roots.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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November 24 - Wed

Picture of the day
Scene from Guy Mannering

A scene from Chapter XXVII of Guy Mannering, a historical novel by Sir Walter Scott that was originally published anonymously in 1815. It is set in the 1760s to 1780s, mostly in the Galloway area of southwest Scotland. The eponymous character of Guy Mannering is actually only a minor character in the story, the plot being mostly concerned with Harry Bertram, the son of the Laird of Ellangowan, who is kidnapped at the age of five by smugglers. It follows the fortunes and adventures of Harry and his family in subsequent years, and the struggle over the inheritance of Ellangowan. The novel also depicts the lawlessness that existed at the time, when smugglers operated along the coast and thieves frequented the country roads. The book was a huge success, selling out the day after its first edition.

Artist: N. M. Price; Restoration: Adam Cuerden
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November 25 - Thu

Picture of the day
Leptecophylla juniperina fruit

The fruit of Leptecophylla juniperina, a flowering plant native to New Zealand and southeastern Australia. In New Zealand, it is known as Prickly Heath and Prickly Mingimingi, and one subspecies in Tasmania is called Pink Mountain Berry. The plants grow best in areas with moderate winters and cool moist summers, and the fruit is edible.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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November 26 - Fri

Picture of the day
Yellow mite

A digitally colorized scanning electron micrograph of a yellow mite (Lorryia formosa), a common agricultural pest of citrus trees around the world. The magnification in this image is approximately 200x, as specimens are generally less than 250 µm long.

Image: Eric Erbe/Chris Pooley, ARS
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November 27 - Sat

Picture of the day
Shaggy parasol mushroom

A shaggy parasol mushroom, with its cap not yet opened. The common name applies to two closely related species, Chlorophyllum rhacodes and C. brunneum, both of which are found in North America and Europe, with the latter species also present in Australia. The stem typically grows to 10–20 cm (4–8 in) tall, and the cap grows to 7.5–20 cm (3–8 in) across. Shaggy parasols are edible, but are very similar in appearance to the poisonous Chlorophyllum molybdites. Because the two can only be reliably identified by spore print, they are not recommended for inexperienced hunters.

Photo: Jörg Hempel
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November 28 - Sun

Picture of the day
Musk Lorikeet

The Musk Lorikeet (Glossopsitta concinna) is a species of lorikeet found in south-central/eastern Australia. It grows to about 22 cm (9 in) long, and can be identified by its red forehead, blue crown and a distinctive yellow band on its wing.

Photo: Fir0002
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November 29 - Mon

Picture of the day
Blue mussel

Three specimens of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), a medium-sized edible marine bivalve mollusc. Blue mussels live in intertidal areas around the world, attached to rocks and other hard substrates by strong (and somewhat elastic) thread-like structures called byssal threads. They are commonly harvested as food in many different cuisines. In the upper left, the mussel is closed. The upper right shows the mussel slightly open, with the white posterior adductor muscle visible. Lastly, in the bottom individual, the adductor muscle has been cut to allow the valves to open fully.

Photo: Rainer Zenz
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November 30 - Tue

Picture of the day
Royal Avenue, Belfast, 1890s

A photochrom print of Royal Avenue in Belfast, Northern Ireland, from the 1890s. In the 19th century, Belfast became Ireland's pre-eminent industrial city, and saw an influx of immigration, made up of mostly Catholics into a predominantly Protestant city. Sectarian tensions remained high throughout the years, with no major incidents having taken place since 1998's Belfast Agreement.

Image: Detroit Publishing Co.; Restoration: Lise Broer
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October 1 - Fri

Picture of the day
Pūkeko

The Pūkeko (Porphyrio porphyrio melanotus) is a subspecies of the Purple Swamphen, native to New Zealand and elsewhere in Australasia. The name comes from the Māori language; the bird is highly revered in Māori culture because the colour red is associated with nobility and power, and the species has red beaks and legs. It is unknown how the species spread to New Zealand from Australia. It may have been brought by ancestors of Māori, or it may have arrived there on its own.

Photo: Fir0002
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October 2 - Sat

Picture of the day
Italian Market, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

A panoramic view of South 9th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, which is the location of the Italian Market, a commercial area of the city featuring a strong Italian American influence. Italian immigrants began to move into the area around 1884 and many of the present vendors can trace the founding of their businesses back to the first decade of the 20th century. The mural on the left shows Frank Rizzo, mayor of Philadelphia from 1972 to 1980.

Photo: Massimo Catarinella
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October 3 - Sun

Picture of the day
Aldabra Giant Tortoise

The Aldabra Giant Tortoise (Geochelone gigantea), from the islands of the Aldabra Atoll in the Seychelles, is one of the largest tortoises in the world. Similar in size to the famous Galapagos Giant Tortoise, its carapace averages 120 centimetres (47 in) in length. The average weight is around 250 kilograms (550 lb) for males and 150 kilograms (330 lb) for females.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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October 4 - Mon

Picture of the day
Ceriagrion glabrum

Ceriagrion glabrum is a species of damselfly found throughout much of Africa, except for arid locations. The males are orange and green (seen on top here) whilst the females (bottom) range from light brown to dark brown depending on their maturity. The darkened colours in females aid in reproduction.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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October 5 - Tue

Picture of the day
Ornamental initial letters

A set of 16th-century initial capitals, missing a few letters. An initial is a letter at the beginning of a work, chapter or paragraph that is larger than the rest of the text. It is often several lines in height and in older books or manuscripts sometimes ornately decorated.

Artist: Unknown; Vectorization: JovanCormac
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October 6 - Wed

Picture of the day
Palm House, Kew Gardens

The Palm House at the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, an area in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in South West London. The institution has the world's largest collection of living plants (over 30,000) as well as one of the world's largest herbariums, with over 7 million specimens.

Photo: David Iliff
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October 7 - Thu

Picture of the day
Red Flowering Gum

The flower of a Red Flowering Gum (Corymbia ficifolia), one of the most commonly planted ornamental trees in the broader eucalyptus family. It is native to a very small area of South Coast Western Australia, but is not considered under threat in the wild. The common name is somewhat of a misnomer, as the flowers may not necessarily be red, nor is it really a gum tree, but a bloodwood instead.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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October 8 - Fri

Picture of the day
Cheetah cub

A close-up view of a cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) cub. Unlike some other cats, the cheetah is born with its characteristic spots, as well as a downy underlying fur on their necks extending to mid-back, which gives the cub the appearance of the Honey Badger, to scare away potential aggressors. Despite this, up to 90% of cheetah cubs are killed by predators in the early weeks of life. Healthy adult cheetahs have few predators because of their speed.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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October 9 - Sat

Picture of the day
Titanium crystal bar

A 99.995% pure titanium crystal bar, about 14 cm (5.5 in) in length and weighing about 283 g (10.0 oz), made by the iodide process. Titanium has the highest strength-to-weight ratio of any metal and is resistant to corrosion. It can be alloyed with other metals for a wide variety of industrial purposes.

Photo: Alchemist-hp
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October 10 - Sun

Picture of the day
Mean precipitation by month

An animated image showing the long-term mean monthly precipitation around the world. Precipitation occurs when a local portion of the atmosphere becomes saturated with water vapor and condenses, forming rain drops or ice crystals within a cloud via collision that then fall to the surface, except for virga, which evaporates while in the air.

Image: PZmaps
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October 11 - Mon

Picture of the day
Skylark

A Skylark (Alauda arvensis), with two beetles in its beak. Skylarks are found throughout much of the world. It is a mostly dull-looking bird, being mainly brown above and paler below. They are known for the song of the male, which is delivered in hovering flight from heights of 50–100 m (160–330 ft).

Photo: David Iliff
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October 12 - Tue

Picture of the day
1639 Hispaniola map

A c. 1639 nautical map of Hispaniola (center-left), the most populous island in the Americas, and Puerto Rico (right). The name originally given by Christopher Columbus, who founded the first European colonies in the New World here during his first two voyages, was La Isla Española ("the Spanish island"), which was shortened to Española and then Latinised to Hispaniola.

Map: Johannes Vingboons; Restoration: Lise Broer
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October 13 - Wed

Picture of the day
B'nai B'rith membership certificate

A blank membership certificate for B'nai B'rith, the world's oldest continually operating Jewish service organization. B'nai B'rith was founded on October 13, 1843, in New York City by Henry Jones and 11 others as a Jewish counterpart of fraternal orders then flourishing in the United States, but soon began to exercise political influence on behalf of world Jewry. Today, B'nai B'rith engages in community service and welfare activities in more than 50 countries.

Image: Louis Kurz; Restoration: Lise Broer and Adam Cuerden
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October 14 - Thu

Picture of the day
Lophyra sp tiger beetle

A Lophyra species tiger beetle, one of a large group of insectivorous beetles found throughout the world. Both adults and larvae are predatory. The latter live in cylindrical burrows and will capture prey that wanders above the ground. Some species can run at a speed of 8 km/h (5 mph), making them the fastest running land animals for their size.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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October 15 - Fri

Picture of the day
Munttoren, Amsterdam

The Munttoren, a tower in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, as seen from the river Amstel at dusk. The tower was originally part of the Regulierspoort, one of the main gates in Amsterdam's medieval city wall, dating to 1487. After a fire destroyed the gate in 1618, the tower was rebuilt in the Amsterdam Renaissance style, with an eight-sided top half and open spire designed by Hendrick de Keyser, featuring a clock with four faces and a carillon of bells. The name ("Mint Tower") refers to the time when it was temporarily used to mint coins in the Rampjaar ("disastrous year") of 1672 when both England and France declared war on the Dutch Republic, and silver and gold could not be safely transported to Dordrecht and Enkhuizen, where coins were normally minted.

Photo: Massimo Catarinella
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October 16 - Sat

Picture of the day
Rosemary Grevillea

The flower of a Rosemary Grevillea (Grevillea rosmarinifolia), a popular evergreen garden plant native to New South Wales in Australia. The leaves are needle-like, 0.8–3.8 cm (0.3–1.5 in) long, which gives the plant an appearance similar to rosemary.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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October 17 - Sun

Picture of the day
King Midas

An illustration from an 1893 version of A Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys by Nathaniel Hawthorne, which recounted the tale of King Midas. In Greek mythology, Midas was given ability to turn everything he touched into gold by the god Bacchus. However, he soon discovered that he was unable to even eat. Bacchus told him to wash in the river Pactolus, and the power flowed in the river, which was supposedly the reason for why the river was so rich in gold in later years. In Hawthorne's version, Midas' touch even turned his daughter to gold (pictured here).

Artist: Walter Crane; Restoration: Lise Broer
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October 18 - Mon

Picture of the day
Trumpet piston valve

The anatomy of a Périnet piston valve, this one taken from a B♭ trumpet. When depressed, the valve diverts the air stream through additional tubing, thus lengthening the instrument and lowering the harmonic series on which the instrument is vibrating (i.e., it lowers the pitch). Trumpets generally use three valves, with some variations, such as a piccolo trumpet, having four. When used singly or in combination, the valves make the instrument fully chromatic, or capable of playing all twelve pitches of classical music. Trumpets may also use rotary valves instead.

Photo: Guillaume Piolle
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October 19 - Tue

Picture of the day
Honey fungus

Mushrooms of Armillaria hinnulea, a species of honey fungus (or "pidpenky", from Ukrainian). Honey fungi are parasitic fungi that live on trees and woody shrubs. As a forest pathogen, it can be very destructive because unlike most parasites, it does not need to moderate its growth in order to avoid killing its host, since it will continue to thrive on the dead material. Honey fungi are long lived and form some of the largest living organisms in the world, including one that covers more than 3.4 sq mi (8.8 km2) and is thousands of years old. The mushrooms are edible, but can be easily confused with poisonous Galerina species, which can grow side-by-side with Armillaria.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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October 20 - Wed

Picture of the day
Charles XIV John of Sweden

A full-length portrait of then-French Marshal Jean Baptiste Bernadotte (1763–1844), who later became King Charles XIV John of Sweden and Norway. Bernadotte had a long and decorated career in the French Army, when he was unexpectedly elected the heir to the childless King Charles XIII. His election was due to two main factors: the Swedish Army were in favour of electing a soldier in view of future complications with Russia, and he had shown kindness to Swedish prisoners during the recent war with Denmark, part of the Napoleonic Wars. Although he never learned to speak Swedish, during his reign, Sweden and Norway became united, and both experienced great material development.

Artist: Joseph Nicolas Jouy
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October 21 - Thu

Picture of the day
Samuel Taylor Coleridge

An engraving of English philosopher and poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772–1834), most famous for his poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan. Coleridge was a member of the Lake Poets who, with his friend William Wordsworth, founded the Romantic Movement in England. He also helped introduce German idealism to English-speaking culture and was influential on American transcendentalism (via Ralph Waldo Emerson). Throughout his adult life, Coleridge suffered from crippling bouts of anxiety and depression, which he chose to treat with opium, becoming an addict in the process. He died at age 61 due to symptoms typical of prolonged opium usage.

Engraving: Samuel Cousins; Artist: Washington Allston; Restoration: Lise Broer
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October 22 - Fri

Picture of the day
André-Jacques Garnerin's parachute

A schematic depiction of the first successful frameless parachute, invented by André-Jacques Garnerin (1769–1823). On October 22, 1797, Garnerin rode in a basket hanging from the parachute, which was attached to the bottom of a hot air balloon (centre). At a height of approximately 3,000 feet (910 m), he severed the rope that connected his parachute to the balloon. The basket swung during descent, then bumped and scraped when it landed, but Garnerin emerged uninjured.

Artist: Unknown; Restoration: Lise Broer
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October 23 - Sat

Picture of the day
Superb Lyrebird

The Superb Lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae) is a pheasant-sized songbird endemic to Australia. At approximately 100 cm (39 in) long, it is the longest of all songbirds. The male (shown here) has a showy tail, with the two outermost feathers forming the shape of a lyre.

Photo: Fir0002
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October 24 - Sun

Picture of the day
Meadow Argus

A Meadow Argus (Junonia villida) butterfly, with its wings closed in a resting position. The species is found mainly in Australia and neighboring islands, but it was also accidentally introduced to the United Kingdom, where it is known as Albin's Hampstead Eye.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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October 25 - Mon

Picture of the day
The Charge of the Light Brigade at Balaklava

On October 25, 1854, during the Battle of Balaclava in the Crimean War, British cavalry units charged heavily fortified Russian opposition, an action known as the Charge of the Light Brigade. By mischance, they attacked the wrong target, as the orders were unclear, and as a result suffered great casualties. Alfred, Lord Tennyson's famous poem made the charge a symbol of warfare at both its most courageous and its most tragic.

Artist: William Simpson; Restoration: Adam Cuerden
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October 26 - Tue

Picture of the day
Blue Potato Bush

The Blue Potato Bush is one of about 200 species in the genus Lycianthes, which are found mostly in tropical regions of the Americas, and others located in the Asia-Pacific region. Lycianthes is apparently closely related to the chili peppers (Capsicum). However, it was long confused with the nightshades (Solanum), and several little-known Solanum species presumably should be included with Lycianthes.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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October 27 - Wed

Picture of the day
Mandarin Ducks

Mandarin Ducks by Japanese woodblock artist Hiroshige Utagawa, accompanied by a poem which reads:

Out in a morning wind,
Have seen a pair of mandarin ducks parting.
Even the best loving couple makes a quarrel.

Hiroshige was a member of the Utagawa school, which was founded by Utagawa Toyoharu, whose primary innovation was his adaptation of linear perspective to Japanese subject matter. His pupil, Toyokuni I, took over after Toyoharu's death and raised the group to become the most famous and powerful woodblock print school for the remainder of the 19th century, so much so that today more than half of all surviving ukiyo-e prints are from it. In addition to Hiroshige, Kunisada, Kuniyoshi and Yoshitoshi were Utagawa students.

Restoration: Lise Broer
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October 28 - Thu

Picture of the day
Bank of Tanzania

The headquarters of the Bank of Tanzania, located in Dar es Salaam, the central bank of the United Republic of Tanzania. It is responsible for issuing the national currency, the Tanzanian shilling. Since 1995, monetary policy has been its only responsibility.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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October 29 - Fri

Picture of the day
Bromine

A sealed vial of liquid bromine, encased in an acrylic cube, which is a common and secure way of presenting the chemical element for teaching purposes, as its vapors are corrosive and toxic. In nature, bromine exists exclusively as bromide salts in diffuse amounts in crustal rock. Organobromine compounds are used in a wide variety of products, including fire retardant, gasoline additives, pesticides, and anti-convulsant medicines. It has no known essential role in human or mammalian health.

Photo: Alchemist-hp
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October 30 - Sat

Picture of the day
Mycena sp. mushrooms

Unidentified species of mushrooms belonging to the Mycena genus, a large grouping of saprotrophic fungi. Mycena mushrooms are characterized by a white spore print, a small conical or bell-shaped cap, and a thin fragile stem. They are hard to identify to the species level and some are distinguishable only by microscopic features such as the shape of the cystidia. These specimens were observed in Mount Field National Park in Tasmania, Australia.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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October 31 - Sun

Picture of the day
"The Raven"

An illustration by Édouard Manet for a French publication of Edgar Allan Poe's narrative poem "The Raven". In the poem, the raven flies into the narrator's home and perches on a bust of Pallas Athena (seen here). The narrator then asks the bird a series of questions, to which the bird only replies, "Nevermore". Eventually, the narrator falls into despair and ends with his final admission that his soul is trapped beneath the raven's shadow and shall be lifted "Nevermore". Originally published in 1845, the poem was widely popular and made Poe famous, though it did not bring him much financial success. "The Raven" has influenced many modern works and is referenced throughout popular culture in films, television, music and more.

Restoration: Lise Broer
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September 1 - Wed

Picture of the day
Royal Spoonbill

The Royal Spoonbill is a species of spoonbill found through much of the Australasia region. It lives in wetlands and feeds on crustaceans, fish, amphibians and small insects by sweeping its spoon-shaped bill from side to side through water.

Photo: Fir0002
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September 2 - Thu

Picture of the day
Plantain Walk by William Berryman

Plantain Walk by William Berryman, an English artist who was active in Jamaica during the period 1808–16. He produced over three hundred pencil sketches and watercolors of the Jamaican landscape and the daily lives of the island's people, with which he intended to create a series of engravings, but he died before he could begin the project. Much of his unpublished work remained neglected for years, until an album was discovered and acquired by the U.S. Library of Congress.

Restoration: Lise Broer
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September 3 - Fri

Picture of the day
Queenstown, Ontario

A c. 1805 watercolor painting of Queenstown, Ontario (now spelt Queenston), a village within the town of Niagara-on-the-Lake, located 5 km (3 mi) north of the city of Niagara Falls. Queenston was the site of the Battle of Queenston Heights (the hill on the right), the first major battle of the War of 1812.

Artist: Edward Walsh; Restoration: Adam Cuerden
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September 4 - Sat

Picture of the day
Cryptic mantis

The cryptic mantis (Sibylla pretiosa) is a mantid native to southern Africa. Its common name comes from its ability to grow asymmetrically to match the vegetation of its environment. They have unusual leaf-like projections on the joint of their four walking legs and leaf-like wings, generally the only green portion of the insect's otherwise brown and mottled exoskeleton. Adult females grow to 5–6 cm (2.0–2.4 in) in length while the males are generally about 1 cm smaller.

Photo: Luc Viatour
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September 5 - Sun

Picture of the day
Russo-Japanese War cartoon

Japanese woodblock political cartoon showing Tsar Nicholas II of Russia waking from a nightmare of the battered and wounded Russian forces, defeated by Japan in the Russo-Japanese War, which concluded with the signing of the Treaty of Portsmouth on September 5, 1905. Shown here are a battleship, locomotive, cannon and telegraph, who, having been fed up with the number of false reports of Russian victories sent home, have returned to show the Tsar the true damage they have suffered.

Artist: Kobayashi Kiyochika; Restoration: Jake Wartenberg
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September 6 - Mon

Picture of the day
Boy transporting fodder

A Tanzanian boy transporting fodder on a bicycle. "Fodder" refers particularly to food given to domesticated livestock, rather than that which the animals forage for themselves.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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September 7 - Tue

Picture of the day
Seaside daisy

The flower of a seaside daisy (Erigeron glaucus), a member of the daisy family native to the Pacific coast of Oregon and California in the United States. This perennial grows from a stout rhizome and reaches heights between 5 and 30 cm (2.0 and 11.8 in). The stems bear up to 15 flower heads which can grow over 3 cm (1.2 in) wide.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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September 8 - Wed

Picture of the day
Effects of 1900 Galveston hurricane

A house tipped over as a result of the 1900 Galveston hurricane, which made landfall in Galveston, Texas, 110 years ago today. The Category 4 hurricane was responsible for approximately 8,000 deaths, making it the deadliest natural disaster to strike the United States to date (in comparison, 1,800 people died as a result of Hurricane Katrina). After striking Galveston, the storm blew northward to the Great Lakes, then headed eastward just north of Halifax, Nova Scotia, before disappearing into the Atlantic Ocean.

Photo: Griffith & Griffith; Restoration: Lise Broer
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September 9 - Thu

Picture of the day
Water skier

A man engaged in waterskiing, a sport in which an individual is pulled behind a boat or a cable ski installation on a body of water, skimming the surface. Waterskiing is a relatively young sport, having been invented in the early 20th century. The skis this person is wearing are specialized for ski jumping.

Photo: Fir0002
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September 10 - Fri

Picture of the day
Rainbow Lorikeet

The Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus ssp. moluccanus shown here) is a species of Australasian parrot. It is a medium sized bird, with the length ranging from 25 to 30 cm (9.8 to 11.8 in) in size, and has a wingspan of about 17 cm (6.7 in). The weight varies from 75 to 157 g (2.6 to 5.5 oz). Its habitat is rainforest, coastal bush and woodland areas, and it feeds mainly on fruit, pollen and nectar.

Photo: Fir0002
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September 11 - Sat

Picture of the day
Damage to the Pentagon on 9/11

Damage caused by American Airlines Flight 77 to the Pentagon as a result of the September 11 attacks. The flight was one of four commercial airliners hijacked that day, and the perpetrators crashed it into the building, causing 189 deaths, including all 64 on board the plane. The damaged sections were rebuilt in 2002.

Photo: Tech. Sgt. Cedric H. Rudisill, USAF
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September 12 - Sun

Picture of the day
Copper disc

A disc of copper made by continuous casting, the process whereby molten metal is solidified into a "semifinished" state for subsequent rolling in the finishing mills. Continuous casting replaced the creation of ingots using stationary moulds. The process allows lower-cost production of metal sections with better quality, due to the inherently lower costs of continuous, standardised production of a product, as well as providing increased control over the process through automation. After casting, this disc was then etched to achieve its final state.

Photo: Alchemist-hp
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September 13 - Mon

Picture of the day
Common Macrotona

A female Common Macrotona (Macrotona australis) laying eggs. This species of grasshopper is found throughout southern and eastern Australia in heath habitats, usually in conjunction with spinifex grass. It ranges from 1.7 to 3 cm (0.7 to 1.2 in) in length and is usually red or grey in colour, with bronze colouring behind the hind legs.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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September 14 - Tue

Picture of the day
Island of California

A c. 1650 map showing the Island of California, a long-held European misconception, dating from the 16th century, that California was not part of mainland North America but rather a large island separated from the continent by a strait now known instead as the Gulf of California. The belief persisted until the expeditions of Juan Bautista de Anza in 1774–76.

Map: Johannes Vingboons; Restoration: Lise Broer
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September 15 - Wed

Picture of the day
The Roulettes

The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Roulettes aerobatics squadron at the 2008 Australian Grand Prix. The squad was formed in 1970 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the RAAF and perform about 150 flying displays a year throughout Australia and neighboring countries.

Photo: Fir0002
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September 16 - Thu

Picture of the day
Echeveria 'Blue Curl'

The flowers of an Echeveria 'Blue Curl' cultivar. The genus comprises a large number of succulent plants and is named after the Mexican botanical artist Atanasio Echeverría y Godoy. Many of the species produce numerous offsets, and are commonly known as 'Hen and chicks', a term which can also refer to other genera such as Sempervivum. Many Echeveria species are popular as garden plants.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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September 17 - Fri

Picture of the day
Web decorations

An Argiope species of orb-weaver spider sitting on a stabilimentum, the conspicuous silk structure at the center of the web. The purpose of these objects is unknown, although there are a number of theories. It was originally believed to help stabilize the web (hence the term stabilimentum), but this idea is dismissed nowadays.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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September 18 - Sat

Picture of the day
Siege of Paris

The Illustrated London News's depiction of students preparing to defend the Siege of Paris, the final action in the Franco-Prussian War. The siege began on 18 September 1870, and ended four months later with the defeat of France and the proclamation of William I as emperor of the German Empire. Paris sustained more damage in the siege than in any other conflict. Dissatisfaction with the German government led to rebellion and the formation of the Paris Commune in 1871.

Illustrator: Fred Barnard; Restoration: Adam Cuerden
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September 19 - Sun

Picture of the day
Zinc works, Lutana, Tasmania

The Nyrstar zinc works at Lutana, Tasmania, is the island's largest exporter, generating 2.5% of the state's GDP. It produces over 250,000 tons of zinc per year. The town, now a suburb of Hobart, was originally built by Electrolytic Zinc as homes for employees of the smelter.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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September 20 - Mon

Picture of the day
Hardhead duck

A female Hardhead (Aythya australis), the only true diving duck found in Australia, swimming amongst duckweed. Hardheads are relatively small ducks, usually not much more than 45 cm (18 in) long. Both male and female are a fairly uniform dark brown above, with rufous flanks and white undersides.

Photo: Fir0002
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September 21 - Tue

Picture of the day
Keswick, Cumbria, England

A panoramic view of Keswick, a market town in Cumbria, the northwesternmost county in England, as seen from Latrigg, a fell north of the town. Derwentwater and adjacent fells can be seen in the background. The area lies within the boundaries of Lake District National Park.

Photo: David Iliff
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September 22 - Wed

Picture of the day
Isle of Graia, Gulf of Aqaba

An 1839 lithograph showing a caravan passing the Isle of Graia, along the shore of the Gulf of Aqaba, one of two gulfs of the Red Sea, lying east of the Sinai Peninsula. The gulf is named after the city of Aqaba, Jordan's only seaport. It was formerly known as the Gulf of Eilat, after Aqaba's neighboring city Eilat, Israel.

Lithograph: Louis Haghe; Artist: David Roberts; Restoration: Lise Broer
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September 23 - Thu

Picture of the day
Eusthenia sp. stonefly

A Eusthenia species of stonefly. The order contains almost 3,500 known species, including the only known insects that are exclusively aquatic from birth to death. Stoneflies are believed to be one of the most primitive groups of Neoptera and are found worldwide, with the exception of Antarctica.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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September 24 - Fri

Picture of the day
The Concourse, Singapore

An early design for The Concourse, a 175 m (574 ft) tall high-rise commercial and residential building on Beach Road in Kallang, Singapore. The project began in 1981 but was halted when Singapore's economy was hit by a recession in the mid-1980s. A new architectural firm took over in 1987 and completed the building in 1994.

Image: Paul Rudolph; Restoration: Lise Broer
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September 25 - Sat

Picture of the day
Jade plant

A flower and buds of a jade plant (Crassula ovata), a succulent plant native to South Africa, but now popular around the world as a houseplant. Jades are evergreen plants, with leaves the color of jade, hence the common name. Under the right conditions, they may produce small white or pink star-like flowers in early spring.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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September 26 - Sun

Picture of the day
Swaledale sheep

The Swaledale breed of domestic sheep (female shown here) is found throughout the mountainous areas of Great Britain. It is noted for its off-white wool and curled horns in males. The pink spot on the ewe's back is the raddling, which indicates that it has already mated. Swaledales are hardy sheep, and are able to be reared without indoor accommodation. They are an official symbol of the Yorkshire Dales.

Photo: David Iliff
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September 27 - Mon

Picture of the day
Cherokee Trail

A colored sketch of a portion of the Cherokee Trail, a historic overland route starting in what is now the U.S. state of Oklahoma, winding through Kansas and Colorado before joining the Oregon, California and Mormon Trails in Wyoming. It was one of the primary routes used by prospectors in the California Gold Rush. Gold discovered on the route led to the Colorado Gold Rush.

Artist: Daniel A. Jenks; Restoration: Lise Broer
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September 28 - Tue

Picture of the day
Bismuth crystal

A bismuth crystal covered with an iridescent oxide surface. Bismuth is a post-transition metal with the atomic number 83. It is generally considered to be the last naturally occurring stable, non-radioactive element on the periodic table, although it is actually slightly radioactive. Bismuth compounds are used in cosmetics, medicines, and in medical procedures. As the toxicity of lead has become more apparent in recent years, alloy uses for bismuth metal as a replacement for lead have become an increasing part of bismuth's commercial importance.

Photo: Alchemist-hp
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September 29 - Wed

Picture of the day
Don Quixote

An engraving by Gustave Doré of a scene from Miguel de Cervantes's Don Quixote, the most influential work of literature from the Spanish Golden Age in the Spanish literary canon. The scene illustrated here occurs early in the novel, when Alonso Quixano (Quixote's real name) has become obsessed with books of chivalry, and believes their every word to be true, despite the fact that many of the events in them are clearly impossible. Don Quixote was published in two separate volumes, ten years apart. It is considered a founding work of modern Western literature, and it regularly appears high on lists of the greatest works of fiction ever published.

Restoration: Adam Cuerden
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September 30 - Thu

Picture of the day
Charles Pomeroy Stone and daughter

Brigadier General Charles Pomeroy Stone (1824–1887) and his daughter Hettie, photographed together in the spring of 1863. Stone was a career United States Army officer, civil engineer, and surveyor. He fought in the Mexican–American War and was reportedly the first to volunteer for the Union Army in the American Civil War. Afterwards, he also served as a general in the Egyptian Army. His non-military accomplishments include serving as chief engineer for the construction of the base of the Statue of Liberty.

Photo: Unknown; Restoration: Michel Vuijlsteke
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August 1 - Sun

Picture of the day
Pied Oystercatcher

The Pied Oystercatcher (Haematopus longirostris) is a wader native to Australia, where they can be found on sandy coastlines feeding on various bivalve molluscs, but not actually oysters, which are found mostly on rocky shorelines. This oystercatcher species is easily recognized by the characteristic 5–8 cm (2–3 in) long orange-red beak, slender pink legs and black and white plumage.

Photo: Fir0002
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August 2 - Mon

Picture of the day
Water lily house, Kew Gardens

A view of the interior of the water lily greenhouse at the Royal Botanic Gardens, located between Richmond and Kew, in southwest London, England. Covering an area of 121 hectares (300 acres), the gardens are a UNESCO World Heritage Site and contain four Grade I and 36 Grade II listed buildings.

Photo: David Iliff
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August 3 - Tue

Picture of the day
Panned shot of Mercedes-Benz race car

A photograph of a Mercedes-Benz C-Class driven by Paul di Resta during a 2009 Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters race, demonstrating the technique called panning, in which a camera is horizontally moved in order to keep a moving subject in the same portion of the frame. In still photography, panning is used to suggest fast motion, and to bring out foreground from background.

Photo: AngMoKio
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August 4 - Wed

Picture of the day
Landscape Arch

Landscape Arch is the longest of the many natural rock arches located in the Arches National Park in the U.S. state of Utah. The arch is among many in the area known as Devil's Garden in the north area of the park. It was named by Frank Beckwith, leader of the Arches National Monument Scientific Expedition, who explored the area in the winter of 1933–34.

Photo: Cacophony
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August 5 - Thu

Picture of the day
Silver Banksia

Immature (left) and mature (right) flowers of the Silver Banksia (Banksia marginata), a species of tree or woody shrub native to southeastern Australia. It reaches up to 8 m (26 ft) tall and its inflorescences are a palish yellow, cylindrical up to about 10 cm (3.9 in) tall. Flowering occurs from February to June.

Photo: Noodle snacks
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August 6 - Fri

Picture of the day
Hiroshima Peace Memorial

A panoramic view of the Hiroshima Peace Memorial, the site of the first atomic bomb to be used in warfare on August 6, 1945, during the final stages of World War II. Over 70,000 people were killed immediately, and another 70,000 suffered fatal injuries from the radiation, after the U.S. Army Air Force bomber Enola Gay dropped the bomb, codenamed "Little Boy". The Genbaku ("A-bomb") Dome (center) was directly beneath the blast, but managed to survive mostly intact.

Photo credit: Dean S. Pemberton
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August 7 - Sat

Picture of the day
Poster for Richard III

A c. 1884 poster for an American production of William Shakespeare's Richard III, a history play depicting the Machiavellian rise to power and subsequent short reign of Richard III of England. It is the second-longest of Shakespeare's plays (after Hamlet) and is rarely performed unabridged. It is believed to have been written c. 1591, making it one of his earliest plays, and concludes his first tetralogy (also containing Henry VI parts 1–3). It is widely considered to be one of Shakespeare's greatest plays, and contains the famous line, "A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse!"

Lithography: W.J. Morgan & Co.; Restoration: Adam Cuerden
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August 8 - Sun

Picture of the day
Western tent caterpillars

Malacosoma californicum is a species of tent caterpillar, so named because they build conspicuous silk tents in the branches of host trees. They are often considered as pests due to their habit of defoliating trees. They are among the most social of all caterpillars, and the tents facilitate aggregation and serve as focal sites of thermal regulatory behavior.

Photo: Mila Zinkova
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August 9 - Mon

Picture of the day
Seven Sisters, Sussex

The Seven Sisters, a series of chalk cliffs in East Sussex, by the English Channel, looking towards the River Cuckmere and Seaford Head in the background. Located between the towns of Seaford and Eastbourne, they form part of the South Downs. They are the remnants of dry valleys, which are gradually being eroded by the sea.

Photo: David Iliff
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August 10 - Tue

Picture of the day
The Battle of Terheide, 10 August 1653

The Battle of Scheveningen was the final naval battle of the First Anglo-Dutch War. In June 1653, the English fleet had begun a blockade of the Dutch coast. On August 10, English and Dutch ships engaged, resulting in heavy damage to both sides. The blockade was lifted, but Dutch Admiral Maarten Tromp's death was a severe blow, leading eventually to Dutch concessions in the Treaty of Westminster.

Artist: Willem van de Velde the Elder
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August 11 - Wed

Picture of the day
Nankeen Kestrel

The Nankeen Kestrel (Falco cenchroides), native to Australia, New Guinea, and nearby islands, is one of the smallest species of falcon (about 31 to 35 cm (12 to 14 in) in length). Unlike other raptors, it does not rely on speed to catch its prey. Instead, it simply perches in an exposed position, but it also has a distinctive technique of hovering over crop and grasslands.

Photo: Fir0002
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August 12 - Thu

Picture of the day
Rhodotus palmatus fungus

Rhodotus palmatus is an uncommon fungus species found throughout the Circumboreal Region. A detritivore, it is typically found growing on the stumps and logs of rotting hardwoods. Mature specimens may usually be identified by the pinkish color and the distinctive ridged and veined surface of their rubbery caps.

Photo: Dan Molter
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August 13 - Fri

Picture of the day
Moshi, Tanzania

A panoramic view of Moshi, the capital of the Kilimanjaro Region of Tanzania situated on the lower slopes of Mt Kilimanjaro, the tallest mountain in Africa (seen in background). Moshi is home to the Chaga and Maasai tribes and lies on the road connecting Arusha and Mombasa, Kenya.

Photo: Muhammad Mahdi Karim
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August 14 - Sat

Picture of the day
Mignon Nevada

Mignon Nevada (1886–1971), an English operatic soprano, as Ophelia in French composer Ambroise Thomas's opera, Hamlet, c. 1910. Nevada was the daughter of American soprano Emma Nevada, as well as Thomas's goddaughter, who had also written the opera Mignon in 1866, after which she was named. She made her debut in 1908 as Rosina in The Barber of Seville and performed at opera houses across Europe for her entire career.

Photo: Bain News Service; Restoration: Lise Broer
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create

July 15 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 16 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 17 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 18 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 19 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 20 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 21 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 22 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 23 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 24 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 25 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 26 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 27 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 28 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 29 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 30 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

July 31 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 1 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 2 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 3 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 4 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 5 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 6 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 7 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 8 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 9 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 10 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 11 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 12 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 13 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 14 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 15 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 16 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 17 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 18 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 19 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 20 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 21 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 22 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 23 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 24 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 25 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 26 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 27 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 28 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 29 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

June 30 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 1 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 2 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 3 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 4 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 5 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 6 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 7 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 8 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 9 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 10 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 11 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 12 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 13 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 14 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 15 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 16 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 17 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 18 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 19 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 20 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 21 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 22 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 23 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 24 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 25 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 26 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 27 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 28 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 29 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 30 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

May 31 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 1 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 2 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 3 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 4 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 5 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 6 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 7 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 8 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 9 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 10 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 11 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 12 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 13 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 14 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 15 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 16 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 17 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 18 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 19 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 20 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 21 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 22 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 23 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 24 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 25 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 26 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 27 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 28 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 29 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

April 30 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 1 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 2 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 3 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 4 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 5 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 6 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 7 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 8 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 9 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 10 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 11 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 12 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 13 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 14 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 15 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 16 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 17 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 18 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 19 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 20 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 21 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 22 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 23 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 24 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 25 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 26 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 27 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 28 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 29 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 30 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

March 31 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 1 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 2 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 3 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 4 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 5 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 6 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 7 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 8 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 9 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 10 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 11 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 12 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 13 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 14 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 15 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 16 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 17 - Wed

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 18 - Thu

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 19 - Fri

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 20 - Sat

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 21 - Sun

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 22 - Mon

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

February 23 - Tue

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

create

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]

Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.

None selected. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for help.

[{{fullurl:Template:POTD/Error: Total length format strings #time exceeds 6000.|preload=Template:POTDstart&action=edit}} create]