User:Visarga/Kaula

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Practices[edit]

  • the Krama system is also a Kaula tradition, not a separated school[1]
  • on the relationship between Kula and Krama, and on the definition of Kula[2]
  • on the Kaula school, the Kalikula, reference to fundamental texts[3]
  • the definition of Kaula as the group of tattvas - "Kaula as Cosmology" [4]
  • various types of Kula (20 pages !!!)[5]

Sexual Ritual[edit]

Yamala - the tantric couple

The sexual practices of the Kaula school, also known as the the secret ritual, are based on the couple. They are performed with a so called external Śakti (sexual partner)[6] as opposed to the purely meditative practices which involve only one's own spiritual energies (the interior Śakti).

Abhinavagupta gives a pretty radical definition of the tantric couple, from the point of view of an illuminated master: "The couple (yamala) is consciousness itself, the unifying emission and the stable abode. It is the absolute, the noble cosmic bliss consisting of both Śiva and Śakti. It is the supreme secret of Kula; neither quiescent nor emergent, it is the flowing font of both quiescence and emergence." (Tantraloka)[7]

Thus the ultimate form of the tantric couple is identical to the Shiva - Shakti couple. The two lovers are not merely mimicking the Divine Couple, but becoming one with it, and respectively with one another. This state combines both the dynamic and the static aspects of the Divine.

Complete unification of the two

The role of the sexual Kaula ritual is to unite the couple yogini (initiated woman) and siddha (initiated man) and induce one in the other a state of permanent awakening [8] This achievement made possible by the intensity of their love.[9]

First the mental limitations will fall and the force centers will harmonize their energies. In their exalted state, the two become absorbed into consciousness. Becoming united on all the levels, physical, astral, mental and even in their consciousness, they reconstitute the supreme couple of Shiva and Shakti.[10]

Prequalifying conditions

The Kaula sacrifice is reserved for the few, the elites, who can maintain a state of Bhairava (spiritual illumination) while being engaged in the sexual union.[11] Other couples, even if they reproduce the ritual to the letter (as perceived from outside), if they do not attain the Bhairava consciousness, are merely making love.

This path to spiritual accomplishment is considered fast but very difficult. Making use of the enormous forces sleeping inside human sexual potential, the secret ritual accelerates the evolution, but also the risk of failure - thus the need for it to remain a secret. Otherwise we'd have both people failing in their spiritual endeavors (on its account), and a lot of misconception distorting the purpose of this ritual. As any ritual, it lives in the energies accumulated through repetition, over many years - allowing incomplete or distorted applications would be detrimental to its efficacity.

Transmission of initiation from the yogini

Also called "initiation by the mouth of the yogini(yoginī-vaktra)", is a method by which the adept unites with a purified yoginī (advanced female practitioner) and receives the unique experience of the illuminated consciousness directly from her.[12] He is to see her as both his lover and guru. Such practices allow for the transmission of the initiation first from the guru to his female disciples, and then from them to the male disciples, in the end closing the circle.

Sexual sounds

  • focusing on love making sounds (HĀ-HĀ) of the woman leads to the "undivided level"[13]

Sexual fluids

  • the sexual fluids are considered to be endowed with the powers of consciousness[14]The fluids are called "kula"

The three forms of emission[edit]

The energy generated during the tantric sexual act is considered a form of subtle emission[15], while the act of ejaculation is considered a form of physical emission. Depending on the orientation of one's consciousness, introverted or extroverted, emission can be of two kinds:

Śānta is the rested form of emission, when the focus is resting just on the self. It is associated with a state of transcendence.

Udita is the risen form of emission where the focus is resting on the other (the partner in love).[16] This emission is associated to the state of immanence.

Santodita - beyond udita and śānta - is the uniting form, cause of both śānta and udita emissions. Santodita is described as universal bliss (cidānanda or jagadānanda), undivided consciousness[17] and kaula[18].

Abhinavagupta describes this state as the outflow of the pulsation of Shiva and Shakti, undivided and complete.[19]

  • "These two aspects, passive (śānta) and active (udita)," explains Abhinava, "arise at the same time in the power and its possessor. The active passes from one domain to the other, the passive is confined within the Self [the essential nature of both]. But even so, in reality, each of them form a couple (yamala). Hence the emergent is the quiescent" (29: 119-20).[1]
  • Santodita, quiescence and emergence[20]


The 7 levels of bliss during the Kaula sexual union

  • 1: nijānanda - the state of self repose
  • 2: nirānanda - non-bliss
  • 3: parānanda - satiation of the senses; pleasure found in external objects, but without the sense of AHAM (Self)[21] Associated to udyoga (creative outburst)
  • 4: brahmānanda - attention is drawn towards consciousness; a sense of wonder[22] Associated to avabhāsa (manifestation)
  • 5: mahānanda - a stage of bliss where one is intensely focused on his loved one; passionate, mutual absorption; heightened consciousness[23] - Associated to carvaṇa (devouring)
  • 6: cidānanda - the couple loses all sense of differentiation; complete union; reaching the pinnacle of consciousness; the united form of emission[24] - Associated to viśranti (repose)
  • 7: jagadānanda - universal bliss, expansivness; the whole world is seen as coming from them and destined to them; becoming the supreme Kaula; transcending emanation and resorption[25]

Mantric Practice[edit]

Mantric meditation is the most common form of tantric practice. In the Kaula system, this practice is associated especially with the group of phonemes [26][27].

The 50 phonemes (varṇa) of the Sanskrit alphabet are used as mantras denoting various aspects of consciousness(cit) and energy(śakti). The group(kula) of Sanskrit phonemes form a complete description of reality, from the lowest(earth) to the highest(Śiva consciousness) level.[28].

The ritual "setting out" of the phonemes imitate the emanation of the cosmos from the supreme I-consciousness of Śiva.[29] In another ritual, the phonemes are identified with specific zones of the body through the practice of nyāsa, infusing the body with spiritual energy.

This mystical state of culminates in the kaula of the body and such a being is known as a siddha (accomplished one).[30]

The adept attains a form of bodily enlightenment where, through the power of mantras, one comes to recognize the divinities within the body.[31]

Initiation in the mantric practice is based on a transfer of power and the link (lineage) of the heart. Thus simple knowledge of the word or phoneme is not useful in itself, as it does not have efficiency, unless the disciple received his initiation from an authentic master.[32]

Even if the concept of mantra is primarily related to Śakti, it is necessary to remember that Śakti and Śiva are always united. Thus, the supreme mantra, paravak, is equated to I-consciousness of the Lord[33].

A mystical system[edit]

  • Kaula is an esoteric system based on complex tantric symbolism, obscure to ratioal analysis, but rather suited for direct practical experience. In order to grasp it,one needs to be initiated, a process which implies a mystic transfer of energy (descent of the śakti) that will open the disciple's heart and reveal the truth [34] The core of mystical practices is considered to be an inner teaching [35] that form the basis and origin of the sophisticated philosophical systems of [Kashmir Shaivism] even if they might seem more primitive at first glance
  • Kaula puts extreme emphasis on experiential replication [36] [37]

Intuitive revelation[edit]

  • the mere knowledge of the Kashmir Shaivism methods of attaining Shiva are considered enough to procure liberation by a process of intuition (prathibā)[38]. Spiritual intuition is described as a process of descent of the Shakti transmitting a form of knowledge beyond discursive thinking.

Texts[edit]

  • while the more philosophical doctrines of Kashmir Shaivism form the "outer teachings", Kaula represents the "inner teachings", esoterical aspects aimed at the attainment of enlightenment [39]
  • Rudra Yāmala Tantra, Kulārṇava Tantra, Svaccanda Tantra, Netra Tantra, Tantrarāja Tantra [40], the 3rd chapter of Tantraloka


References[edit]

  1. ^ The Canon of the Śaivāgama and the The Kubjikā Tantras of the Western Kaula, Mark S. G. Dyczkowski, page 75
  2. ^ Auspicious Wisdom, The Texts and Traditions of Śrīvidyā Śākta Tantrism in Shouth India; Douglas Renfrew Brooks, page 19
  3. ^ Triadic Mysticism; Paul E. Murphy, page 5
  4. ^ The Kula Ritual, As Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Abhinavagupta, John R. Dupuche, page 47
  5. ^ The Kula Ritual, As Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Abhinavagupta; John R. Dupuche, pages 35-55
  6. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 114
  7. ^ Tantraloka by Abhinavagupta Cap. 29 Verse. 116-117a
  8. ^ Kundalini, energy of the depths, Lilian Silburn, p. 160
  9. ^ Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa, Jaideva Singh, page 45
  10. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 136
  11. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 102
  12. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 82
  13. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 140
  14. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 141
  15. ^ See Sexual sublimation, Ojas and Visarga
  16. ^ The Kula Ritual, As Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Abhinavagupta, John R. Dupuche, 263
  17. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 261,263
  18. ^ Kundalini, energy of the depths, Lilian Silburn, p. 187
  19. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 268
  20. ^ Silburn, pag 168
  21. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 136
  22. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 137
  23. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 137
  24. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 137
  25. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 137
  26. ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 62
  27. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 82
  28. ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 63
  29. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 81
  30. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 117
  31. ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 60
  32. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 80
  33. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 81
  34. ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 14
  35. ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 201
  36. ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 57
  37. ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 4
  38. ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 151
  39. ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 201
  40. ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 58


More[edit]

  • Kaulikī Śakti - power of the embodied cosmos - is both Kuṇḍalinī and a cosmic force [1]; the source of the manifestation[2]
  • KAULIKI - even tough it resides in the immanence (kula), it is itself transcendent (akula)
  • kaulikī śakti - the power of the Embodied Cosmos is both an energy of the body (kuṇḍalinī) and a cosmic energy [3]
  • abides both in transcendence (akula) and immanence (kula), is Śiva kaula[4]
  • Kula is Śakti and Akula is Śiva, Akula contains Kula as "A" contains all the other phonemes[5]
  • Kaula is Śiva, also Akula is Śiva [6]
  • Paratrisika-Laguvritti - a Kaula text, 36 stanzas, on the topic of Matrika and Parabija, pag. 204, The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega
  • Kaula literature, pag. 57, The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega
  • The three forms of Kaula (corporal, group practice, phonematic mysticism), pag.58, 61 , The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega
  • Deha (the body), pag. 59..60, The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega
  • Kula - holographic unity (bimba pratibimba), pag. 63, The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega
  • Cosmic Kaula, Human Kaula, pag. 100, 109-110, The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega
  • Lingam, pag. 111, The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega
  • Yoni, pag. 113, The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega
  • The various meanings of Kaula, pag. 31-37, 49, Para-trisika Vivarana, Jaideva Singh
  • Kaulika Siddhi, pag. 49, Para-trisika Vivarana, Jaideva Singh

Removed Stuff[edit]

From an exterior/interior point of view, Kaulika-siddhi can be seen as both extroverted and introverted. Its extroverted aspect is that of instrument of perception (the whole body-mind complex being itself is a Kula, thus, having Kaulika shakti as its unifier)[7]. On the other side, the introverted aspect of Kaulika-siddhi is that of pure I-consciousness, the substrate of all the objective and subjective life.

If Kula is the limited consciousness, Akula is the absolute Consciousness (parasamvit), the unsurpassed reality (anuttara) and uncreated light (Prakāśa)[8][9]. Limited consciousness is seen as a mere external object compared to the supreme consciousness Cit, which can never be an object of contemplation itself as it is the pinnacle of the subjectivity.

Kauliki (Shakti) is the energy of Akula (Shiva), identical to self awareness (Vimarśa), the sleeping bodily energy (Kuṇḍalinī), the force of emission (Visarga), beatitude of the Śiva-Śakti union (Ananda)[10]. Thus under various names there is only one force.

Kauliki acts as a perfect mirror, reflecting in it both the supreme (Akula) and the manifested (Kula), "mirror" that is identical to the cosmic beatitude (ānanda)[11].

Kauliki (shakti, ananda) is thus said to be the supreme energy, containing all possibilities, full of all qualities, pervading everything from the absolute down to the material plane and reflecting everything in itself as mere aspects. "Pervading everything" is another way of saying "reflecting everything in itself". The idea here is that wherever there is manifestation or even in the absolute itself, the Kauliki energy is the ubiquitous substrate.


Kauliki pervades at various levels - supreme - mental - physical - social

Consciousness is all pervading, true nature


Kauliki is an all pervading energy, nothing being outside its realm. The notion of containing everything manifested in itself is described sometimes as "reflecting" everything in itself like a mirror[12]. The levels which are pervaded (reflected) in Kauliki seem to be arranged on a sliding scale, from the largest to the smallest unit of manifestation[13]. In order, from interior to exterior, they are:

  • the absolute, denoted also as:
    • anuttara - unsurpassable
    • akula - beyond objectivity
    • Shiva - The Lord
    • Cit - supreme consciousness
    • Prakasa - uncreated light
  • the supreme energy[14] - also known as
    • Vimarsa - power to reflect[15]
    • Visarga - power to emit the creation (universe)
    • Shakti - the divine energy
    • Kuṇḍalinī - the coiled divine energy, sleeping inside the body
    • Ananda - supreme bliss
  • the limited subjects (mental level)[16][17][18]
    • the mental group (Kula) being made of the five senses, sensorial mental, ego and intellect[19]
  • the exterior objects (material level)
    • the physical body - a Kula of the organs and instruments of the body[20]
    • external objects - a Kula of material objects that rely on the first five tattvas (The 36 tattvas), from prithivi to akasa
  • the spiritual family (social level)
    • a group based on brotherly love, common spiritual aims and openness, led by a master who has revealed his Supeme Self, Atman


  • Kaula refers to Kula (Shakti), Akula (Shiva) and their manifestations, all of which form reality. Kaula is knowledge in its three aspects of knower, known and knowing[21]
  • Liberation (moksa) is nothing else than the revelation of one's nature, and one's nature is simply consciousness of the self.[22]
  • Initiation does not give what is not already known, but rather cuts bonds which might hinder a person from self recognition[23]
  • the body - union of yoni and lingam[24]
  • the subtle-breath (unification of prana and apana)[25]
  • consciousness (unification of the subject and object, all the objects of the senses are offered as sacrifice to consciousness); the fire of consciousness devours everything that is dual[26]
  • the adept of Kaulism cultivates either Anavopaya or Shambhavopaya[27]
  • the Kaula ritual is accomplished in thought, word or action, in wordly activities, in relation to a woman, in couple, in the body, breath and thought[28]
  • the effortless method - Śāmbhavopāya - direct and immediate entry in nirvikalpa [29]
  • Udyoga, avabhāsa, carvaṇa and viśranti are the four steps of the Krama system.
    • ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 60
    • ^ Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa, Jaideva Singh, page 61
    • ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 60
    • ^ Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa, Jaideva Singh, page 62
    • ^ Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa, Jaideva Singh, page 171
    • ^ Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa, Jaideva Singh, page 62
    • ^ Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa, Jaideva Singh, page 49
    • ^ Kundalini, energy of the depths, Lilian Silburn, p. 18
    • ^ Vāc, The Concept of Word in Selected Hindu Tantras, p. 239, 244, 245
    • ^ Kundalini, energy of the depths, Lilian Silburn, p. 19
    • ^ Vāc, The Concept of Word in Selected Hindu Tantras, p. 278
    • ^ Vāc, The Concept of Word in Selected Hindu Tantras, p. 278
    • ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 101
    • ^ Kundalini, energy of the depths, Lilian Silburn, p. 19
    • ^ Vāc, The Concept of Word in Selected Hindu Tantras, p. 278
    • ^ Kundalini, energy of the depths, Lilian Silburn, p. 18
    • ^ Vāc, The Concept of Word in Selected Hindu Tantras, p. 239, 244, 245
    • ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 63
    • ^ Parā-trīśikā Vivaraṇa, Jaideva Singh, page 49
    • ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 60
    • ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 86
    • ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 89
    • ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 89
    • ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 148
    • ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 149
    • ^ Abhinavagupta: The Kula Ritual, as Elaborated in Chapter 29 of the Tantrāloka, Page 150
    • ^ The Trika Śaivism of Kashmir, Moti Lal Pandit, page 279
    • ^ Kundalini, Energy of the depths, p177-178
    • ^ The Triadic Heart of Shiva, Paul Muller-Ortega, page 58