User talk:AVarchaeologist

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Welcome!

Hello, AVarchaeologist, and welcome to Wikipedia! Thank you for your contributions. I hope you like the place and decide to stay. Here are some pages that you might find helpful:

I hope you enjoy editing here and being a Wikipedian! Please sign your messages on discussion pages using four tildes (~~~~); this will automatically insert your username and the date. If you need help, check out Wikipedia:Questions, ask me on my talk page, or ask your question on this page and then place {{helpme}} before the question. Again, welcome! Baffle gab1978 (talk) 21:01, 21 September 2010 (UTC) Open for comments, suggestions, contributions and discussions.

Louis Ducos du Hauron[edit]

Thank you for the alert. I have reverted the change, and warned the uploader not to do it again, thus:

I have reverted your recent change. Please do NOT change to your "better color" version again. It is artificially saturated, shows print through the sky, and omits the edges, which are crucial in understanding the three-color subtractive process. I repeat, do NOT change to that version again.

Greetings from Finland, --Janke | Talk 19:54, 29 August 2010 (UTC)

About references[edit]

Hi, AVarchaeologist, and welcome to Wikipedia. I noted your changes to Reversal film starting here. Thanks for spending the time to add to the article. I realise that you know a lot about early colour photography, and wish to correct errors in Wikipedia, and that's a great attitude. But please use references when changing referenced text and adding new text. if in doubt, you can always discuss the proposed changes, or request sources, on the article's talk page.

I have copy-edited a few of your additions. Regarding your change to the referenced date of Autochrome's discontinuation; the reference used is Sowerby (ed) 1961, which gives the date as 1937. If you have conflicting evidence, you can add something like "...however, Jones and Smith give the date 1934.".

Unless something is patently obvious, please give references for your additions. For example, if you're adding material to Photography, the text "Most photographers use cameras to produce images" wouldn't require a reference, but "Some photographers stand on their heads when taking photographs" would be questioned without a reference. Unreferenced material can be challenged and possibly removed without discussion.

I know that Wikipedia can be confusing, but you can always as for help at the Help desk, or search the extensive help pages. I've added a welcome template to the top of this page, which I hope you'll find useful.

Cheers, and happy editing :-) Baffle gab1978 (talk) 21:01, 21 September 2010 (UTC)

thank you for the glass lantern slide help[edit]

I might work that into the illustrated song page some day, just a little too busy right now. But thank you much for the info.Peter (talk) 14:39, 14 October 2010 (UTC)

Tartans and Maxwell[edit]

Your friend is quite possibly correct that it doesn't correspond to a known (ie, named and registered) tartan, but that doesn't rule out it being a tartan regardless...

Most tartan patterns available today are named ones, but it isn't the case that a pattern has to have a formal name in order to be considered tartan - it simply has to be constructed in the right sort of way. There is a central registry, but it's descriptive rather than prescriptive - it aims to describe the versions in existence rather than "authorise" them, as would be the case with heraldic registries. A particular piece of 1850s/60s tartan having no known named pattern is perhaps unsurprising; there was a widespread craze for tartans around this period, which no doubt led to an equivalent boom in the number of short-lived "fashion" patterns produced by mills, and the formal registries didn't come into existence until a century later.

Examining the picture, I'm quite confident it's some form of tartan - fabric design isn't my field, and it may technically be something very similar, but it certainly looks like it to me. The perpendicular lines on the two main strips aren't clear (and the fact that it's a little crumpled isn't helping) but they do seem to be present - I can tentatively see five on the left and three or four on the right - and the distinctive diagonal "dark" weave on the coloured sections is also visible. Perpendicular lines on the lower sections are harder to make out - I can see one - but one of the features of tartan is that the patterns are quite large, and so small foldings of it may well not show any cross lines.

Maxwell describing it simply as a "coloured ribbon" is interesting, but I don't think it's safe to assume that he did so out of some particular belief it wasn't tartan - it could be as mundane as his wanting to seem less provincial when speaking to the Royal Institution! I'd be happy to use "coloured ribbon" if we've got a solid source to point to saying it isn't tartan, but the term does seem pretty widely used - I don't think we should drop it without a solid reason. Shimgray | talk | 20:15, 13 April 2011 (UTC)

Whilst some of them are probably highlights (the broad white bar on the left ribbon, for example) there's also some which are quite likely to be lines on the fabric - just below the broad white line, for example, there's a thin one which exists in the shadowed region and visibly folds along with the lay of the cloth. It's worth bearing in mind that because of the large squares on some tartans, it's possible to cut sections without any apparent crosslines, which might explain why we don't see many on the bow.
As to saying "often described as...", the problem is that this implies a challenge to the existing interpretation without explaining what it is. If we're going to have caveats we should probably present a source for them, to avoid confusing the reader, but I'm not sure there is one that explicitly challenges the term.
I've had a look at the original documents, incidentally, and I think I can explain why "coloured ribbon" may have been used - note that while Maxwell's name is on one, they're both written in the third person. ("The speaker then proceeded..."). If they were written up retroactively from notes by a third party, they won't have had the image to refer to and so will be describing their recollection of what they saw, possibly at some distance. In that situation, it seems quite likely they'd not mention details of the pattern! Shimgray | talk | 22:40, 15 April 2011 (UTC)

Gramophone record[edit]

Good job with your recent edits to this and other vintage audio articles. Keep up the good work! ThemFromSpace 21:10, 8 August 2011 (UTC)

A barnstar for you![edit]

Editors Barnstar Hires.png The Editor's Barnstar
Excellent work on Gramophone record and related articles. This was long-overdue. 78.26 (talk) 19:46, 20 November 2011 (UTC)

A barnstar for you![edit]

Editors Barnstar Hires.png The Editor's Barnstar
Thank you for improving the article Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky. Again, very much appreciated! Regards. Kürbis () 21:48, 2 October 2012 (UTC)

A barnstar for you![edit]

Original Barnstar Hires.png The Original Barnstar
Improvements to Sound recording and reproduction and other AV articles -—Kvng 14:31, 12 October 2012 (UTC)

RCA Records and the 45[edit]

Re RCA Records#The post-war 1940s

Thank you for correcting the longstanding mis-information about the development of the 45rpm record. One small detail I would like to question. You state "At first, most 45s were issued on colored vinyl specific to the musical genre: classical music was on red vinyl, country music on green vinyl, children's music on yellow vinyl, pop music on blue vinyl, etc." I'm not sure I could say that "most" were issued on colored vinyl. The reason is that by far the biggest selling series was the 47-prefix that corresponded to the 20-prefix 78rpm series (though not on a one-to-one basis at first). I have never, ever, in 40 years of collecting seen this series issued on anything other than black vinyl. Yes, the earliest issues in this series used a blue label, not a black one as usually found within a couple of years, but the vinyl itself was still black. There was a blue vinyl "pops" series used for musicals and light instrumental music, this series didn't last too long although the "Rose Marie" set turns up regularly. Have you seen a copy of the regular popular series (47) in colored vinyl? I have learned that you always find out something new you've never seen before when collecting phonograph records. Thanks! 78.26 (I'm no IP, talk to me!) 17:14, 4 January 2013 (UTC)

Hi, and thanks. All that was "heritage" text, not added by me but blue-penciled a bit as part of my editing. Based on personal record-rummaging experience, I'm rather skeptical, too. On visits to the record store as a 1950s preschooler, I was always fascinated by the array of exotic vinyl colors of the 45s prominently displayed as a visual attraction, but none of the labels featured the funny little dog listening to the record player. They had names like "Fantasy" and "Jubilee" and "King" and my mother wouldn't buy any of them for me just because they were pretty. I can't recall ever seeing an RCA Victor 45 in any color but black, transparent red or blue, but I am not a collector of rare 45s. RCA Victor's early press releases to the trade do indeed state that color-coding of the vinyl, not just the labels, was to be a standard feature of the product. At least one such statement may be found in the 1949 issues of Billboard now available online. Some histories of the 45 (categorized as "good quality" in my mental filing cabinet, but I can't cite one now) state that it was implemented at first but soon abandoned because of the onerous manufacturing complications, so it seems that there may indeed have been yellow and green and orange wax issues very early on. AVarchaeologist (talk) 03:12, 5 January 2013 (UTC)
P.S. Your query prompted me to refresh (and augment) my memory with some googling. The 1949 Billboard issues are available in the original via Google Books but are difficult, although interesting, to search through that way. Most of the relevant material is conveniently quoted here [1]. This book [2] claims that colored wax was retired from commercial pressings "by 1952". I believe red wax was still being used for some collector's and "prestige" issues at least a few years beyond that date, and I suspect that the rarer colors were discontinued within a year of introduction. In this discussion [3] a collector reports actual physical examples:
Eddy Arnold (country) 48-0025 & Lawrence Duchow (polka) 48-0024: Green with Green label. (both a very nice "emerald" green)
Jarl-Franzen Duo (Scandinavian) 53-6252: Teal with a Black label.
Fran Allison (childrens, little nipper series) 47-0218 Yellow with Teal label.
No specimens of orange or cerise, alas. It appears that you're familiar with RCA Victor's oddball numbering system, so perhaps you can determine the years of first issue for these. I'll probably fuss with the WP edits a bit more -- a list of the colors might best be put in a footnote rather than left bulking up the main text -- and also make a start at legitimizing them with a cit of this reprint of the big 1949 RCA Review article [4], which ought to make it clear to any reasonable person that the system was not just arbitrarily thrown together as a hasty response to the LP. AVarchaeologist (talk) 18:49, 5 January 2013 (UTC)
Yes, I have copies of each color, including the orange/cerise. All these colors did exist. If the statement had said "The majority of the series were colored vinyl" that would be a 100% correct statement. These are the colors they used (in order of how commonly I've found them:
pop - black
classical "Red Seal" - red
children's - yellow
green - country/western
blue (blue label) - popular classics
teal (black label) - international
orange/cerise - "blues and rhythm"
perhaps I could take a picture of these, might be useful for the article. By the way, there's a press release here, showing the colors [5]. This release doesn't show the difference between blue and teal, but they vinyl is indeed different colors. The years of first release for each color was 1949. RCA released a box set introducing the 45rpm, and one record from each series was in the set. All the best, 78.26 (I'm no IP, talk to me!) 05:16, 6 January 2013 (UTC)
Just to be clear (no waxy pun intended), non mea culpa regarding the word "most", which, along with "pop music on blue vinyl", was already there before I did any editing. I believe my last edit whipped it all into a factually accurate statement, with one likely exception: "orange" and "cerise" are not the same thing. The latter is a purplish red, sometimes described as the color of a baked cherry as opposed to a fresh one. Were both colors used for R&B? The illustration you link (a little hard to judge by -- the Red Seal is very far from ruby red and the black is greenish) shows the "blues and rhythm" wax as dull orange. The upload of a nice new true-colored photo of examples of all the colors lined up and suitably lit would undoubtedly be a boon to Wikipedia and discophilic mankind. There's a "cit needed" tag on a statement about early RCA colored wax in another article and a widespread misconception that colored vinyl was a much later development, IMHO most directly dealt with by photographic evidence. As you can tell, I am by no means an expert in this corner of the phonographic world, but -- the story of my WP life -- I eventually get sick and tired of seeing the same wrong or misleading or very badly worded statements and dig in, figuring that as long as I leave the article better than I found it, as usually seems to be the case judging by the absence of reversions or negative feedback, I'm doing my bit to stem the online proliferation of error until some more expert hand comes along. AVarchaeologist (talk) 06:42, 6 January 2013 (UTC)

Work on Lee-Turner colour[edit]

Thank you for your work on Lee-Turner colour!Da5nsy (talk) 13:25, 25 April 2013 (UTC)

A barnstar for you![edit]

Civility Barnstar Hires.png The Civility Barnstar
Thanks for your nice contribution to the Technicolor talk page today.... Ariconte (talk) 04:26, 13 May 2013 (UTC)

Another barnstar for you![edit]

Vitruvian Barnstar Hires.png The da Vinci Barnstar
Thanks for the elegant, high quality edits you've brought to several technical subjects, including the Volta Laboratory and the Photophone articles. The clarity you provide is notable. Best, from one of the muddlers: HarryZilber (talk) 13:14, 15 May 2013 (UTC)

Help![edit]

Please look at this article Wikipedia_talk:Articles_for_creation/Carbon_tissue. It need some rewriting, Could you help me with this.-- 117.221.227.138 (talk) 17:59, 17 October 2013 (UTC)

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Talkback[edit]

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Hello, AVarchaeologist. You have new messages at 78.26's talk page.
Message added 20:30, 27 June 2014 (UTC). You can remove this notice at any time by removing the {{Talkback}} or {{Tb}} template.

78.26 (His Wiki's Voice) 20:30, 27 June 2014 (UTC)

Cartoons[edit]

What do you think of these schemes? Suggestions welcome. I figure we need some sort of scheme for what is going on chemically. --Smokefoot (talk) 01:44, 7 July 2014 (UTC)

conversion of AgBr to image
draft cartoon for photographic processing

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Suggested "television article" text[edit]

I have modified your version slightly. I really don't see a huge need for the reference to "true LED television displays" in the lead. My main concern was just to identify the commonly used marketing of "LED" as generally being used for LED-backlit LCDs. Here is my suggested text:

"The replacement of bulky, high-voltage cathode ray tube (CRT) screen displays with compact, energy-efficient, flat-panel alternatives such as LCDs (both fluorescent-backlit and LED-backlit), plasma displays, and OLED displays was a major hardware revolution that began penetrating the consumer computer monitor market in the late 1990s and soon spread to TV sets."

Rreagan007 (talk) 04:33, 17 August 2014 (UTC)