User talk:Astredita

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Welcome![edit]

Hello, Astredita, and welcome to Wikipedia! Thank you for your contributions, especially what you did for Retrograde and prograde motion. I hope you like the place and decide to stay. Here are a few links to pages you might find helpful:

Please remember to sign your messages on talk pages by typing four tildes (~~~~); this will automatically insert your username and the date. If you need help, check out Wikipedia:Questions, ask me on my talk page, or ask your question on this page and then place {{help me}} before the question. Again, welcome! — Reatlas (talk) 00:33, 10 August 2013 (UTC)

Astredita, you are invited to the Teahouse[edit]

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Hi Astredita! Thanks for contributing to Wikipedia.
Be our guest at the Teahouse! The Teahouse is a friendly space where new editors can ask questions about contributing to Wikipedia and get help from peers and experienced editors. I hope to see you there! Technical 13 (I'm a Teahouse host)

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Please stop reverting me[edit]

I'm cleaning up the links so that User:Citation bot can properly cite the articles. Please let the bot finish. Headbomb {talk / contribs / physics / books} 22:10, 4 November 2013 (UTC)

40 billion[edit]

FOLLOWUP - Seems astronomer Geoffrey Marcy (co-author) is quoted as follows:

Marcy says if you combine that result with this newer study looking at sun-like stars, it suggests that our Milky Way galaxy contains something like 40 billion Earth-sized planets with lukewarm temperatures. "So that's really the stunning number, I think," says Marcy.

ALSO, just now received a recent email message from astronomer Erik Petigura (co-author) as follows:

Hi, Dennis.

Great question! We found that 22±8% of G and K type stars have an 1-2x Earth-size planet in the habitable zone. Converting that into a number of planets requires multiplying by the number of stars in the Galaxy. Astronomers quote different total numbers of stars in the Milky Way. Most say 200 billion stars. But one often hears 100 billion and sometimes 400 billion. It's not well known.

About 1/4 of the stars are GK "sunlike" stars. So, adopting 200 billion stars in total, the Milky Way has about 50 billions sun-like (GK) stars. Of those, 22% have a planet 1-2X the size of Earth in their habitable zones. Thus we have 22% of 50 billion suns, coming to 11 billion Earth-size planets in the habitable zones of the sun-like stars in the Milky Way.

If you include the red dwarf stars, the vast majority, the total comes to 40 billion Goldilocks planets.

Cheers,

Erik

On Nov 5, 2013, at 2:00 PM, Dr. Dennis Bogdan <drbogdan@comcast.net> wrote:

Hello Erik,

I'm a Wikipedia editor currently involved with some astronomy articles - Question (if possible) => how many habitable earth-like (or "earth-sized"?) exoplanets are estimated to be orbiting sun-like stars in the Milky Way Galaxy? - seems the media has reported "40 billion" ( ref => http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/05/science/cosmic-census-finds-billions-of-planets-that-could-be-like-earth.html - some editors on Wikipedia think the estimated number may be different (estimates range from 8.8 billion to 100 billion) -

Thanking you in advance for your reply - Enjoy! :)

Dennis

in any case - hopefully, some of this helps in some ways - Enjoy! :) Drbogdan (talk) 22:38, 5 November 2013 (UTC)

FWIW - a supporting citation for "11 billion" earth-sized exoplanets orbiting sun-like stars in the Milky Way Galaxy seems to be => < ref name="LATimes-20131104">Khan, Amina (November 4, 2013). "Milky Way may host billions of Earth-size planets". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 5, 2013. </ref> - Enjoy! :) Drbogdan (talk) 23:49, 5 November 2013 (UTC)

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March 2014[edit]

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Kepler[edit]

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