User talk:CodeCat

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An Administrative Discussion Involving You[edit]

Hello. There is currently a discussion at Wikipedia:Administrators' noticeboard/Incidents regarding an issue with which you may have been involved. Thank you.

Please see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Administrators%27_noticeboard/Incidents#Altaic_languages_Warring

— Preceding unsigned comment added by AltaicNPOV (talkcontribs) 01:12, 6 April 2013‎ (UTC)

Indo-European ablaut; last editor.[edit]

Hi I saw that you were the last person to do any editing to the page, so I thought you would be the best person to ask about making changes. I wanted to add some examples of the ablaut in some of the other old IE languages like Sanskrit etc and was wondering if you felt this was appropriate? Ragztoriches (talk) 00:28, 7 September 2014 (UTC)

I think it would be best to include more information detailing how ablaut, as a system, was inherited and changed within each language. Putting it in the "Subsequent development" section would make the most sense. CodeCat (talk) 00:39, 7 September 2014 (UTC)

September 2014[edit]

Hello, I'm BracketBot. I have automatically detected that your edit to Proto-Greek language may have broken the syntax by modifying 3 "<>"s. If you have, don't worry: just edit the page again to fix it. If I misunderstood what happened, or if you have any questions, you can leave a message on my operator's talk page.

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Hello, I'm BracketBot. I have automatically detected that your edit to Proto-Greek language may have broken the syntax by modifying 2 "<>"s. If you have, don't worry: just edit the page again to fix it. If I misunderstood what happened, or if you have any questions, you can leave a message on my operator's talk page.

It's OK to remove this message. Also, to stop receiving these messages, follow these opt-out instructions. Thanks, BracketBot (talk) 15:27, 8 September 2014 (UTC)

Hello, I'm BracketBot. I have automatically detected that your edit to Proto-Greek language may have broken the syntax by modifying 2 "<>"s. If you have, don't worry: just edit the page again to fix it. If I misunderstood what happened, or if you have any questions, you can leave a message on my operator's talk page.

It's OK to remove this message. Also, to stop receiving these messages, follow these opt-out instructions. Thanks, BracketBot (talk) 18:22, 8 September 2014 (UTC)

Removal in article on Catalan language[edit]

Hi, CodeCat. You removed my edit in the Catalan language article and asked for discussion, so I have started the discussion in the talk page. Maybe I didn't formulate well my explanation and that's why it sounded to you as "the true Scot". What I actually meant is that no scholar supports the RACV theses. When I say no scholar, I mean that no one in the academic world, that is in a university or research centre, supports these theses. They are totally excluded from the academic world.

Regarding the quote, I have been looking for information on the author of the book chapter that is quoted. He is a collaborator of the RACV and is not a linguist. He says in some web pages that he has a diploma in Valencian Philology, while this is a diploma that doesn't exist. In any case, it's normal that he defends the RACV because he is or has been employed by them. Furthermore, the book where this is published deals with linguistic identity, so maybe the ideas of this author can be a good example of a certain linguistic attitude of a part of the Valencians, but the affirmation that "a minority of scholars support the RACV theses" is false because these theses are to the academic world as theses defending that the pyramids of Egypt were created by aliens. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Toni P. (talkcontribs) 09:59, 18 September 2014 (UTC)

Dutch long diphthongs[edit]

Hello. How can [eɪu oʊi əɪu əʊi] be falling, if in all cases the next vowel is higher/closer than the previous one? [eəɑ] would be falling, not these... Peter238 (talk) 20:44, 26 September 2014 (UTC)

Falling and closing are different things. These triphthongs are both falling and closing. It's described on Diphthong in more detail. CodeCat (talk) 20:53, 26 September 2014 (UTC)
Ok, thanks. Peter238 (talk) 20:57, 26 September 2014 (UTC)
Could you check the English on Diphthong#Narrow_and_wide? I've just added it. Peter238 (talk) 12:44, 28 September 2014 (UTC)
It looks ok. CodeCat (talk) 12:46, 28 September 2014 (UTC)