User talk:Hopeless308

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Welcome![edit]

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Again, welcome!  WhatamIdoing (talk) 19:28, 14 February 2011 (UTC)

Brachial Plexus Stretch Test[edit]

Purpose: The brachial plexus stretch test should replicate the patient’s symptoms if there is a traction injury or a compression injury.


Procedure: The patient should be sitting while the examiner stands behind the patient and puts one hand on the side of the patient's head and the other hand on the shoulder on the same side. Laterally flex the head while applying slight downward pressure on shoulder.


Results: Test is positive if pain radiates into arm opposite to the laterally flexed neck.


Special considerations/implications: Brachial plexus neurapraxia If pain is in the neck on the side towards lateral flexion there may be a pinched nerve or facet joint impingement. If pain is on the side opposite lateral flexion there is tension (stretching) of the brachial plexus. Do not perform test if cervical fracture or dislocation is suspected.


Reference:

Konin, Jeff G., Denise L. Wiksten, Jerome A. Isear, and Holly Brader. Special Tests for Orthopedic Examination. 3rd ed. Thorofare, NJ: SLACK Incorporated. 2006. 76. Print.

Starkey, Chad, Sara D. Brown, and Jefferey L. Ryan. Orthopedic and Athletic Injury Evaluation Handbook. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis. 2010. 371. Print.

Swallow test[edit]

Purpose: The swallow test tests for cervical spine obstructions or tumors in the anterior cervical spine regions.


Procedure: The patient should sit while the examiner stands next to the patient. Then the patient is asked to swallow.


Mechanism:


Results: Increased pain or difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)


Notes: Check to see the patient's head is in a neutral position because swallowing becomes more difficult when the neck is extended.


Reference:

Konin, Jeff G., Denise L. Wiksten, Jerome A. Isear, and Holly Brader. Special Tests for Orthopedic Examination. 3rd ed. Thorofare, NJ: SLACK Incorporated. 2006. 19. Print.