User talk:Howard Alexander

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

[Foregoing archived to the bin.]

Howard Alexander (talk) 13:45, 14 January 2009 (UTC)

Yogh[edit]

I endeavoured to intervene. The person in question is not listening and does not care about data integrity. Neither is anyone else joining in on the discussion. -- Evertype· 16:19, 5 January 2009 (UTC)

I don't detect any evidence that I have made any difference. And I don't see anyone else joining in on the discussion. -- Evertype· 00:42, 6 January 2009 (UTC)

Royal Standard of Scotland[edit]

Hi. At Talk:List_of_English_flags you stated that:

"In Scotland a servant may bear his lord's arms, which would seem shocking to an English herald. Thus in Scotland certain high officials may bear a royal banner (the Lion in that case, preserved for that purpose only)".

I'd like to refer to this aspect of heraldry in Scotland, whereby "a servant may bear his lord's arms", in the Royal Standard of Scotland article but can't find a source. Do you know of one? Regards. Endrick Shellycoat 07:39, 29 September 2009 (UTC)

Thank you very much for the refs, much appreciated. Regards Endrick Shellycoat 08:15, 10 October 2009 (UTC)

Bishops sending stuff to India, 883[edit]

The guy sending the stuff should have been Wulfsige of Sherborne in 883. I don't suppose we understand why the names are considerably different. While we are at it, why the appellation "of Sherborne"? No last names just towns they were from, I suppose? Thanks. Student7 (talk) 22:39, 29 September 2009 (UTC)

Sihtric Cáech[edit]

I'm sorry, but I did not understand your latest edit/editsummary here [1]. Not actually Norse, though Dublin was. as summary while changing Norse-Gael to Norse doesn't really make sense to me. (I did understand the part about Mercia though :) Regards, Finn Rindahl (talk) 20:05, 20 October 2009 (UTC)

Thanks for your response. The use of Gaelic names I guess is based on that this is how they're given in most of the sources (the Irish chronicles), as far as I know there are no sources in Norse regarding these persons who were active in Britain and Ireland 9th 10th Century - meaning that "Sigtrygg" is a deduction from Sithric etc, same with Amlaib -> Olaf, Aralt ->Harald and so on. It get's trickier with names like Ragnall which could be either Ragnar or Ragnvald (Røgnvald). I notice people seem to have different opinions regarding the use of nominativ r for these names, personally I prefer Sigtrygg and use that form when I write at Wikipedia in Norwegian. In Norwegian it also comes natural to use Norse forms (deducted or not) so that I don't have to chose between English/Saxon/Gaelic forms.
That Sigtrygg should have been married to the daughter of a high king was interesting news to me, would that be Muirgel daughter of Flann Sinna? The article already mentions his marriage to Ætherstans sister Orgiue/Eadgifu - possibly mother of Olaf Sigtryggson.
As for Norse-/Gaelicness that's a bit hard to tell. Sigtrygg was a third generation "immigrant" (although a not very peaceful one), and his family had surely been influenced by the poeple they'd been living amidst those 50 years. When it is correct to say that they were no longer "pure" Norse I don't know (nor is it terribly important what we label them in my opinion). Regards, Finn Rindahl (talk) 21:36, 20 October 2009 (UTC)
I found a reference regarding Sigtrygg as Nialls brother if your interrested: Byrne writes in his article "Ireland before the battle of Clontarf" (A New History of Ireland: I - PreHistoric and Early Ireland, ed. Daibhi O Croinin. 2005, ISBN 0-19821-737-4 , p. 857): "Níall Glúndub's mother was Máel Muíre, daughter of Cínaed mac Ailpín... ...It is not impossible that the Anglo-Saxon annalist of York was correct when he asserted that Níall was brother to the Sitric who slew him in 919, for Máel Muire may have been married also to a son of Ivar." Best regards, Finn Rindahl (talk) 09:02, 22 October 2009 (UTC)

Those amazing maps[edit]

Nuvola apps edu languages.svg
Hello, Howard Alexander. You have new messages at Rannpháirtí anaithnid's talk page.
You can remove this notice at any time by removing the {{Talkback}} or {{Tb}} template.

Thorn and Eth[edit]

Regarding your question about Thorn (þ) and Eth (ð) See my talk page. Herbolzheim (talk) 22:29, 30 August 2012 (UTC)

Odd edits[edit]

I see we both got involved here and similar. I absolutely do not get what the user was trying to do. I'm afraid that the baby could perhaps have gone out with the bathwater, as in some cases I couldn't even determine whether an edit was serious in intent or not. But given the context and the number of edits that were clearly dubious, if not outright vandalism, I think that reverting everything was probably the cautious and sensible thing to do. Cheers DBaK (talk) 14:16, 3 January 2013 (UTC)

Disambiguation link notification for March 14[edit]

Hi. Thank you for your recent edits. Wikipedia appreciates your help. We noticed though that when you edited Suffrage, you added a link pointing to the disambiguation page Maori (check to confirm | fix with Dab solver). Such links are almost always unintended, since a disambiguation page is merely a list of "Did you mean..." article titles. Read the FAQ • Join us at the DPL WikiProject.

It's OK to remove this message. Also, to stop receiving these messages, follow these opt-out instructions. Thanks, DPL bot (talk) 14:01, 14 March 2013 (UTC)

Disambiguation link notification for March 18[edit]

Hi. Thank you for your recent edits. Wikipedia appreciates your help. We noticed though that when you edited Galwegian Gaelic, you added a link pointing to the disambiguation page Irish (check to confirm | fix with Dab solver). Such links are almost always unintended, since a disambiguation page is merely a list of "Did you mean..." article titles. Read the FAQ • Join us at the DPL WikiProject.

It's OK to remove this message. Also, to stop receiving these messages, follow these opt-out instructions. Thanks, DPL bot (talk) 08:52, 18 March 2014 (UTC)