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Contents

The Signpost: 28 January 2015[edit]

The Signpost: 04 February 2015[edit]

The Signpost: 11 February 2015[edit]

The Signpost: 18 February 2015[edit]

Hi ... i have a question ...[edit]

can you tell me the difference between Zone of Disturbed Weather and Tropical Disturbance ... Thanks you Final-Fantasy-HH (talk) 17:46, 22 February 2015 (UTC).

The Signpost: 25 February 2015[edit]

The Signpost: 25 February 2015[edit]

The Center Line: Winter 2015[edit]

The Center Line header.svg
Volume 8, Issue 1 • Winter 2015 • About the Newsletter
Departments
Features
State and national updates
ArchivesNewsroomFull IssueShortcut: WP:USRD/NEWS
MediaWiki message delivery (talk) on behalf of Imzadi1979 (talk · contribs) 18:37, 28 February 2015 (UTC)

WikiCup 2015 March newsletter[edit]

One of several of Godot13's quality submissions during round 1

That's it, the first round is done, sign-ups are closed and we're into round 2. 64 competitors made it into this round, and are now broken into eight groups of eight. The top two of each group will go through to round 3, and then the top scoring 16 "wildcards" across all groups. Round 1 saw some interesting work on some very important articles, with the round leader Australia Freikorp (submissions) owing most of his 622 points scored to a Featured Article on the 2001 film Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within which qualified for a times-two multiplier. This is a higher score than in previous years, as Smithsonian Institution Godot13 (submissions) had 500 points in 2014 at the end of round 1, and our very own judge, Colorado Sturmvogel_66 (submissions) led round 1 with 601 points in 2013.

In addition to Freikorp's work, some other important articles and pictures were improved during round one, here's a snapshot of a few of them:

You may also wish to know that The Core Contest is running through the month of March. Head there for further details - they even have actual prizes!

If you are concerned that your nomination—whether it is at good article candidates, a featured process, or anywhere else—will not receive the necessary reviews, please list it on Wikipedia:WikiCup/Reviews. Questions are welcome on Wikipedia talk:WikiCup, and the judges are reachable on their talk pages or by email. Good luck! If you wish to start or stop receiving this newsletter, please feel free to add or remove yourself from Wikipedia:WikiCup/Newsletter/Send. Figureskatingfan (talk · contribs · email), Miyagawa (talk · contribs · email) and Sturmvogel 66 (talk · contribs · email)

Thanks for your assistance! Miyagawa (talk) on behalf of Wikipedia:WikiCup.

(Opt-out Instructions) This message was send by Jim Carter through MediaWiki message delivery (talk) 04:54, 1 March 2015 (UTC)

WikiCup 2015 March newsletter[edit]

One of several of Godot13's quality submissions during round 1

That's it, the first round is done, sign-ups are closed and we're into round 2. 64 competitors made it into this round, and are now broken into eight groups of eight. The top two of each group will go through to round 3, and then the top scoring 16 "wildcards" across all groups. Round 1 saw some interesting work on some very important articles, with the round leader Australia Freikorp (submissions) owing most of his 622 points scored to a Featured Article on the 2001 film Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within which qualified for a times-two multiplier. This is a higher score than in previous years, as Smithsonian Institution Godot13 (submissions) had 500 points in 2014 at the end of round 1, and our very own judge, Colorado Sturmvogel_66 (submissions) led round 1 with 601 points in 2013.

In addition to Freikorp's work, some other important articles and pictures were improved during round one, here's a snapshot of a few of them:

You may also wish to know that The Core Contest is running through the month of March. Head there for further details - they even have actual prizes!

If you are concerned that your nomination—whether it is at good article candidates, a featured process, or anywhere else—will not receive the necessary reviews, please list it on Wikipedia:WikiCup/Reviews. Questions are welcome on Wikipedia talk:WikiCup, and the judges are reachable on their talk pages or by email. Good luck! If you wish to start or stop receiving this newsletter, please feel free to add or remove yourself from Wikipedia:WikiCup/Newsletter/Send. Figureskatingfan (talk · contribs · email), Miyagawa (talk · contribs · email) and Sturmvogel 66 (talk · contribs · email)

Thanks for your assistance! Miyagawa (talk) on behalf of Wikipedia:WikiCup.

(Opt-out Instructions) This message was send by Jim Carter through MediaWiki message delivery (talk) 05:55, 1 March 2015 (UTC)

Wikipedia:Today's featured article/March 20, 2015[edit]

If there's stuff you like in the TFA paragraph, please consider copying it over. I notice the text says "South-west" but the page title says "South-West". The Main Page gets a lot of casual traffic; not all those readers will know that "90°E" is a longitude. And ... well just in general, consider my changes and whether you approve. I'll come back later on and have a look again at the lead section. Gratz on your TFA day. Hope the music is going well. - Dank (push to talk) 02:54, 2 March 2015 (UTC)

Alan[edit]

Can you please remove the (1998) from Cyclone Alan (1998) and get rid of the disambiguation page per WP:Two Dabs.Jason Rees (talk) 22:59, 3 March 2015 (UTC)

The Signpost: 04 March 2015[edit]

Sunday March 22: Wikipedia Day NYC Celebration and Mini-Conference[edit]

Sunday March 22: Wikipedia Day NYC 2015
Statue-of-liberty tysto.jpg
2014 Barnard College Barnard Hall entrance facade.jpg

You are invited to join us at Barnard College for Wikipedia Day NYC 2015, a Wikipedia celebration and mini-conference for the project's 14th birthday. In addition to the party, the event will be a participatory unconference, with plenary panels, lightning talks, and of course open space sessions.

We also hope for the participation of our friends from the Free Culture movement and from educational and cultural institutions interested in developing free knowledge projects.

10:00pm - 9:00 pm at Barnard College, 3009 Broadway, by W 118th St

We especially encourage folks to add your 5-minute lightning talks to our roster, and otherwise join in the "open space" experience! Newcomers are very welcome! Bring your friends and colleagues! --Pharos (talk) 21:58, 9 March 2015 (UTC)

(You can subscribe/unsubscribe from future notifications for NYC-area events by adding or removing your name from this list.)

The Signpost: 11 March 2015[edit]

Barnstar for You![edit]

GA barnstar.png The Good Article Barnstar
For your contributions to bring Cyclone Honorinina to Good Article status. Thanks, and keep up the good work!  — ₳aron 21:14, 12 March 2015 (UTC)

DYK for Cyclone Honorinina[edit]

Coffee // have a cup // beans // 12:02, 17 March 2015 (UTC)

The Signpost: 18 March 2015[edit]

.

Re: Sandbox8[edit]

Thanks very much for the compliment! I had not finished it because, as always, I see myself as an aspiring researcher (meaning someone who, by definition, knows how to write thoroughly yet concisely) with good historical practice, so I prefer to gain access to as many sources as possible, and to hone the art of writing, before completing an article. (That's why I haven't yet finished several sandboxes, including the article on the 1926 Miami hurricane. In truth, my goal is to eventually write a featured article on that and perhaps other significant U.S. tropical cyclones—those of true historic significance, whether culturally, monetarily, or otherwise. I would probably target not only the Miami hurricane, but also the 1900 Galveston hurricane, the 1928 Okeechobee hurricane—which needs major revisions, both to the source formats/links and to the body, considering all the raw, unused material out there—the 1935 Labor Day hurricane, and the 1938 New England hurricane. I may add some others to this list in the future. As an aside, my grandmother experienced the 1938 hurricane in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and has vivid memories of the storm to this day.)

I have a personal interest in the Miami and Okeechobee hurricanes because, as a former South Floridian now in the Tampa–St. Petersburg metropolitan area, I have read and heard so much about these storms from historical sources; I have a personal collection of interviews, old newspaper articles, photographs, and other materials, many from local historical societies, that shows how notorious, tragic, and significant those cyclones were in the region, especially in the often-forgotten Lake Okeechobee area and the Everglades—the scene of the greatest casualties in both 1926 and 1928. Even though most people only think about the 1928 storm, the 1926 hurricane caused equally catastrophic flooding, but in a different part of the area: on the southwest shore, whereas the 1928 storm affected the southeast and northern sides of the lake. Also, in the case of 1926, most people only think about Miami, but in fact more than a quarter of the storm's deaths (excluding those from Lake Okeechobee!) probably occurred outside the city: in Miami Beach, in Fort Lauderdale–Hollywood, on the southwest coast, and in the Florida Panhandle.

Few people realize just how large and intense the 1926 hurricane was. According to historical sources I've read, hurricane-force winds occurred from Key Largo to Stuart, a distance of more than 100 miles. An anemometer, probably elevated, recorded sustained winds of 132 mph at Hillsboro Lighthouse (in northern Broward County), which, accounting for elevation, probably converts to about 90 mph at 10 meters, the standard elevation of observation. That means near-Category 2 winds occurred well to the north of the eye wall. (The actual eye of the hurricane made landfall near Perrine, about 10–15 miles south of Miami.) Accounts tell of people shoveling a foot of sand from the second and third stories of buildings on Hollywood beach. The storm tide in Bahia Mar, on the coast near Fort Lauderdale, approached 13 feet. Numerous gauges on the New River reported a storm tide of about 7 feet. The tide carried boats into downtown Fort Lauderdale. Newspapers reported hundreds of buildings destroyed in Hollywood and Fort Lauderdale alone—two cities that were outside the eye wall. More than 50 people probably died in Broward County. The entire beach between Miami Beach and Delray Beach was washed out to sea; waves rose more than 30 feet to the top of the barrier island in Boca Raton; 25 feet of sand vanished from the foundation of the Hillsboro Lighthouse. Only a steep cliff remained where Florida State Road A1A once stood. Cities as far north as West Palm Beach reported roofs torn from buildings, warehouses destroyed, and trees snapped.

Now, bear in mind that the 1926 storm made landfall with winds of 145 mph—a very strong Category 4 hurricane, almost as strong as Andrew in 1992. Yet it was two to three times the size of Andrew. It also spent several days as a strong Category 4 hurricane over the Bahamas. Based on everything that I have read, the storm was likely undergoing the initial stages of an eyewall replacement cycle as it made landfall in South Florida. The angle of approach, the intensity over a long period of time, the radius of gale-force winds, and the landfall point also worked to enhance not only the wave heights, but also the storm tide—that is, the storm tide away from Biscayne Bay. All these factors explain the large storm tide in an area (Fort Lauderdale) normally protected from such an event. They also explain survivors' accounts that the wind in Fort Lauderdale briefly lulled a bit, but did not calm, as the hurricane made landfall near Miami. Such an occurrence would hint at an outer eyewall structure. In short, the 1926 hurricane was close to a worst-case scenario for South Florida. Rarely does a hurricane of such large size and extreme strength hit the United States. Most of the strongest impacts—1935, Andrew, Charley—have been small, rapidly intensifying cyclones, not large, steady-state ones. Most of the large cyclones to hit the United States in recent decades were much weaker than the 1926 storm and were often weakening before landfall. The 1926 hurricane was more like Carla in 1961 than other large cyclones, like Katrina in 2005, that weakened before landfall at the same time they expanded. Carla was a very large storm, yet it made landfall as a high-end Category 4 hurricane.

In addition to the rarity of the 1926 event, there are quite a few questions about its impact. In particular, there are some glaring gaps in the official records: the official death toll of 372, based on Red Cross records, is commonly accepted for the entirety of the storm, when in fact, based on my research, it only includes deaths on land in the United States; many deaths in the Bahamas and at sea apparently went unrecorded. Besides the official deaths, hundreds of missing transients, especially migrant workers, in South Florida may have died, though several of these probably survived and went elsewhere. Many workers lived in frail tenements during the land boom; when the storm destroyed these structures, many may have died due to injuries from flying debris. They lacked close relatives to look after them, and so their identities and whereabouts went unknown. Finally, while black migrant deaths comprised most of the casualties in 1928 (and were tragically ignored, then and now, in large part due to racial attitudes), probably few other disasters killed as many white, well-off farmers—making historical ignorance of the storm all more glaring. Most intriguingly, the 1926 storm devastated the Seminole and Miccosukee tribes in the Everglades; I have managed to uncover an account or two from a Miccosukee in the Everglades, but it is too brief for my taste, so I am looking for more information.

Back to Typhoon Cora: I found only one particularly good source regarding damages and construction practices on the islands affected, but I would like to dig into some archival material from the National Archives, ship logs, surface station data, the Navy (which flew the reconnaissance missions into West Pacific typhoons at the time), diaries/personal accounts, and, of course, the states affected, which would necessitate some fluency in Japanese and Chinese, particularly the Wade–Giles in use at the time. CapeVerdeWave (talk) 00:45, 25 March 2015 (UTC)

The Signpost – Volume 11, Issue 12 – 25 March 2015[edit]

Wikipedia:Today's featured article/April 18, 2015[edit]

A summary of a Featured Article you nominated at WP:FAC will appear on the Main Page soon. Was there anything I left out of the summary that you'd like to see put back in? I'd appreciate it if you could you check the article one more time before its day on the Main Page. Also, please check the link in the lead to "Caribbean territory"; it seems to point to a Pacific island. I just went with an unlinked "U.S. Caribbean territories", which seems clear enough, but feel free to link it if you like. - Dank (push to talk) 23:43, 29 March 2015 (UTC)

The Signpost, 1 April 2015[edit]

The Signpost: 01 April 2015[edit]

Cyclone Lam good article nomination[edit]

I don't know if you're aware, but I reviewed Cyclone Lam for good article status here. Thanks. Seattle (talk) 19:53, 3 April 2015 (UTC)

Directory of notable Wikipedians[edit]

Hello there, Hurricanehink! I'm AmericanLemming, and I've been putting together a list of notable Wikipedians by topic; that is, organizing them by the areas in which they tend to write articles. Under the "Meterology" subsection I've compiled a list of notable editors working on hurricane articles, of which you are one. I've put the list together using recent DYKs, recently promoted GAs, and recently promoted FAs and FLs, as well as the Wikipedia:List of Wikipedians by featured article nominations page. The list of editors is as follows:

Anyway, I was wondering if you could tell me if I'm missing any important editors who work or worked on hurricane articles. You've been around Wikipedia long enough and have made enough edits in this area that I figure you're pretty familiar with all the hurricane aficionados. As long as they have 5,000 edits and have made focused contributions to hurricane, tropical cyclone, or extreme weather articles, they can be included. And do note that I include all notable editors on a particular topic, including these who have retired and/or those who are banned/blocked. I'd greatly appreciate your input on this matter, seeing as you have a much better idea of who the important hurricane editors are than I do. AmericanLemming (talk) 22:33, 4 April 2015 (UTC)

The Signpost: 08 April 2015[edit]

The Signpost: 08 April 2015[edit]

The Signpost: 08 April 2015[edit]

Newspapers.com check-in[edit]

Hello Hurricanehink,

You are receiving this message because you have a one-year subscription to Newspapers.com through the Wikipedia Library. This is a brief update, to remind you about that access:

  • Please make sure that you can still log in to your Newspapers.com account. If you are having trouble let me know.
  • Remember, if you find this source useful for your Wikipedia work, to include citations with links on Wikipedia. Links to partner resources are one of the few ways we can demonstrate usage and demand for accounts to our partners. The greater the linkage, the greater the likelihood a useful partnership will be renewed. Also, keep in mind that part of Newspapers.com is open access via the clipping function. Clippings allow you to identify particular articles, extract them from the original full sheet newspaper, and share them through unique URLs. Wikipedia users who click on a clipping link in your citation list will be able to access that particular article, and the full page of the paper if they come from the clipping, without needing to subscribe to Newspapers.com. For more information about how to use clippings, see http://www.newspapers.com/basics/#h-clips .
  • Do you write unusual articles using this partner's sources? Did access to this source create new opportunities for you in the Wikipedia community? If you have a unique story to share about your contributions, let me know and we can set up an opportunity for you to write a blog post about your work with one of our partner's resources.

Finally, we would greatly appreciate it if you filled out this short survey. Your input will help us to facilitate this particular partnership, and to discover what other partnerships and services the Wikipedia Library can offer.

Thank you,

Wikipedia Library Newspapers.com account coordinator HazelAB (talk) 14:00, 13 April 2015 (UTC)

April 29: WikiWednesday Salon and Skill-Share NYC[edit]

Wednesday April 29, 7pm: WikiWednesday Salon and Skill-Share NYC
Wikimedia New York City logo.svg
Statue-of-liberty tysto.jpg

You are invited to join the Wikimedia NYC community for our inaugural evening "WikiWednesday" salon and knowledge-sharing workshop by 14th Street / Union Square in Manhattan.

We also hope for the participation of our friends from the Free Culture movement and from educational and cultural institutions interested in developing free knowledge projects. We will also follow up on plans for recent and upcoming editathons, and other outreach activities.

After the main meeting, pizza and refreshments and video games in the gallery!

7:00pm - 9:00 pm at Babycastles, 137 West 14th Street

Featuring a keynote talk this month on Lady Librarians & Feminist Epistemologies! We especially encourage folks to add your 5-minute lightning talks to our roster, and otherwise join in the "open space" experience! Newcomers are very welcome! Bring your friends and colleagues! --Pharos (talk) 18:28, 14 April 2015 (UTC)

(You can subscribe/unsubscribe from future notifications for NYC-area events by adding or removing your name from this list.)

Newspapers.com access[edit]

Hi Hurricanehink,

You should be able to sign in and get full access to Newspapers.com now. HazelAB (talk) 14:45, 17 April 2015 (UTC)

The Signpost: 15 April 2015[edit]

Wikipedia:Today's featured article/May 6, 2015[edit]

You know the drill. A summary of a Featured Article you nominated at WP:FAC will appear on the Main Page soon. I had to squeeze the summary down to around 1200 characters; was there anything I left out you'd like to see put back in? I'd appreciate it if you could check the article one more time before its day on the Main Page. Are there any free images to go with the text? - Dank (push to talk) 21:46, 17 April 2015 (UTC)

I like today's already, Hurricane Erika (1997), precious again, --Gerda Arendt (talk) 05:21, 18 April 2015 (UTC)

Would you like to join the topic?[edit]

Hi Hink. It's been a long time. But I was just asking if you would like to join the topic: Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Tropical cyclones#PAGASA only-named storms with JTWC designations? It would be great if you would like to help. Thanks and have a great day! Typhoon2013 (talk) 23:25, 18 April 2015 (UTC)

@Typhoon2013: I know you weren't actually talking to me, but I think Hink already knows (he replied as Hurricanehink mobile a few says ago). Dustin (talk) 23:33, 18 April 2015 (UTC)
@Dustin V. S.: Whoops! Didn't see that and I thought it was someone else. Typhoon2013 (talk) 23:59, 18 April 2015 (UTC)

The Signpost: 22 April 2015[edit]

The Signpost: 29 April 2015[edit]

Disambiguation link notification for May 4[edit]

Hi. Thank you for your recent edits. Wikipedia appreciates your help. We noticed though that when you edited 1928 Okeechobee hurricane, you added links pointing to the disambiguation pages Nassau and Grand Turk (check to confirm | fix with Dab solver). Such links are almost always unintended, since a disambiguation page is merely a list of "Did you mean..." article titles. Read the FAQ • Join us at the DPL WikiProject.

It's OK to remove this message. Also, to stop receiving these messages, follow these opt-out instructions. Thanks, DPL bot (talk) 10:16, 4 May 2015 (UTC)

WikiCup 2015 May newsletter[edit]

C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) is a long-period comet discovered on 17 August 2014 by Terry Lovejoy; and is one of several Featured Pictures worked up by India The Herald (submissions) during the second round.

The second round one has all wrapped up, and round three has now begun! Congratulations to the 34 contestants who have made it through, but well done and thank you to all contestants who took part in our second round. Leading the way overall was Belarus Cas Liber (submissions) in Group B with a total of 777 points for a variety of contributions including Good Articles on Corona Borealis and Microscopium - both of which received the maximum bonus.

Special credit must be given to a number of high importance articles improved during the second round.

The points varied across groups, with the lowest score required to gain automatic qualification was 68 in Group A - meanwhile the second place score in Group H was 404, which would have been high enough to win all but one of the other Groups! As well as the top two of each group automatically going through to the third round, a minimum score of 55 was required for a wildcard competitor to go through. We had a three-way tie at 55 points and all three have qualified for the next round, in the spirit of fairness. The third round ends on June 28, with the top two in each group progressing automatically while the remaining 16 highest scorers across all four groups go through as wildcards. Good luck to all competitors for the third round! Figureskatingfan (talk · contribs · email), Miyagawa (talk · contribs · email) and Sturmvogel 66 (talk · contribs · email) 16:34, 4 May 2015 (UTC)

The Signpost: 06 May 2015[edit]

Wikipedia:Today's featured article/May 24, 2015[edit]

I'll get to work on this one soon. You know the drill. - Dank (push to talk) 18:38, 8 May 2015 (UTC)

June 10: WikiWednesday Salon / Wikimedia NYC Annual Meeting[edit]

Wednesday June 10, 7pm: WikiWednesday Salon / Wikimedia NYC Annual Meeting
Wikimedia New York City logo.svg
Statue-of-liberty tysto.jpg

You are invited to join the Wikimedia NYC community for our next evening "WikiWednesday" salon and knowledge-sharing workshop by 14th Street / Union Square in Manhattan.

This month will also feature on our agenda: recent and upcoming editathons, the organization's Annual Meeting, and Chapter board elections.

We also hope for the participation of our friends from the Free Culture movement and from educational and cultural institutions interested in developing free knowledge projects. We will also follow up on plans for recent and upcoming editathons, and other outreach activities.

After the main meeting, pizza and refreshments and video games in the gallery!

7:00pm - 9:00 pm at Babycastles, 137 West 14th Street

Featuring a keynote talk this month to be determined! We especially encourage folks to add your 5-minute lightning talks to our roster, and otherwise join in the "open space" experience! Newcomers are very welcome! Bring your friends and colleagues! --Pharos (talk) 16:22, 12 May 2015 (UTC)

(You can subscribe/unsubscribe from future notifications for NYC-area events by adding or removing your name from this list.)

Reanalysis[edit]

I changed all the infoboxes on the season pages (in many cases, the minimum pressure is uncertain since it was peripheral or not at peak intensity, which will remain an issue at least until the 1970s when Dvorak estimates become available to continuously assess pressures), as well as a few storm pages. A couple storm pages I did detailed updates (such as Hazel 1954). However, most individual storm pages have not been updated, and new storms have no write-ups at this time. CrazyC83 (talk) 18:59, 14 May 2015 (UTC)

The Signpost: 13 May 2015[edit]

The Signpost: 20 May 2015[edit]