User talk:MicPowell

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Hi MicPowell, and Welcome to Wikipedia! Wikipedia-logo.png

Welcome to Wikipedia! I hope you enjoy the encyclopedia and want to stay. As a first step, you may wish to read the Introduction.

If you have any questions, feel free to ask me at my talk page — I'm happy to help. Or, you can ask your question at the New contributors' help page.


Here are some more resources to help you as you explore and contribute to the world's largest encyclopedia...

Finding your way around:

Need help?

How you can help:

Additional tips...

Good luck, and have fun. --TOL 00:31, 29 September 2007 (UTC)

Appreciated[edit]

While your knowledge is appreciated, this is not the place for this information. The talk page would be better. As for that particular article, you apparently have a lot of knowledge on the subject. Perhaps you could add some sources about it in accordance with WP:V, WP:RS, WP:NOR, and WP:SOAP. If you have any questions, please contact me on my talk page. — BQZip01 — talk 08:57, 3 October 2007 (UTC)

Your additions seem excellent, but just simply need to be sourced. No malice was intended by my comments. More pictures can ALWAYS be useful. In addition, please sign your comments. — BQZip01 — talk 22:26, 5 October 2007 (UTC)

Hello[edit]

Hello: I've asked for somebody to help you: Writting Masters. You are a lil' bit lost. I'm new too and I don't have experience, but I can point you some things:

  • When you edit an article, don't sign it. Only sign in the discussion page (use it to discuss the article).
  • Read before edit. Perhaps you're writing in a wrong place.
  • Read the help: I know it's boring, but it's necessary.
  • Give concrete sources (don't say "See Dover Press", cite author, date, pages, etc.). You can learn it in the wikipedia help

You can ask for help on the New contributors help page too. Good luck and happy editing! --Owdki talk 09:01, 3 October 2007 (UTC)

Oooops! Someone have already answered you while I was writing. --Owdki talk 09:03, 3 October 2007 (UTC)

Signature[edit]

Thank you for your contributions, but note that we do not place signatures in articles. These are reserved to be used in talk pages only. ≈ jossi ≈ (talk) 21:31, 5 October 2007 (UTC)

Spelling[edit]

Hi MicPowell, I left a note on your new contributor's article on "Writting" - perhaps you mean "writing"? cheersJulia Rossi 03:05, 7 October 2007 (UTC)


Thanks for you interest on Calligraphy[edit]

I moved back your comments into the talkpage, here, explaining why. Don't be worry, every body make tinies mistakes the first days ^__^ . I'm sure you will slowly understand the rules and make valuable and efficient contributions.

Thanks for your help ! Yug (talk) 22:57, 13 October 2007 (UTC) (former author of the section "east asian calligraphy", and "Western calligraphy" in the "calligraphy" article.)

I also encourage you to write more about you and your interest for writing in your own user page. Yug (talk) 23:02, 13 October 2007 (UTC)


Origins of the Round hand[edit]

Hello MicPowell. I formated your comment into a little more acceptable article style, 
and included it into the article. Please see the code of this section to understand 
my improvements. Regards, Yug (talk) 06:13, 12 February 2010 (UTC)

Your comment on the Round Hand talkpage

It is true that the Round Hand is English but merely by default of the English Language itself and the spelling of round. In the mid 1600s French officials were flooded with documents written in various hands and varied levels of skills, never mind artistry. As a result the officials complained that many such documents were were beyond their ability to cipher and this led to the Office of the Financier restricting all legal documents to three hands. Namely the Coulee, the Rhonde, and a Speed Hand sometimes simply called the Bastarde. While there were many great French Masters at the time the most influential in proposing these Hands was Louis Babedor, who published his Les Escitures Financieres Et Italienne Bastarde Dans Leur Naturel circa 1650.

In fact with the destruction of the Camera Apistolic during the sack of Rome in 1527 the capitol for Writing Masters moved to Southern France and by the turn of the century the Italic Chancery Circumflessa began to replace and was a technological refinement of the Italic Cursiva. It is this Italic Circumflessa that directly fathered the Rhonde and later English Roundhand.

In England, Ayres and Shelly popularized the Round Hand while Snell is noted for his reaction to them, and warnings of restraint and proportionality. Still Edward Crocker began publishing his copybooks 40 years before the aforementioned.

See Joyce Irene Whalley: The Art of Calligraphy, Western Europe & America circa 1980.

--MicPowell (talk) 10:12, 29 July 2009 (UTC)


Change into article style

The Round Hand is English but merely by default of the English Language itself and the spelling of round. In the mid 1600s French officials were flooded with documents written in various hands and varied levels of skills, never mind artistry. As a result the officials complained that many such documents were were beyond their ability to cipher and this led to the Office of the Financier restricting all legal documents to three hands. Namely the Coulee, the Rhonde, and a Speed Hand sometimes simply called the Bastarde.[1]

While there were many great French Masters at the time the most influential in proposing these Hands was Louis Babedor, who published his Les Escitures Financieres Et Italienne Bastarde Dans Leur Naturel circa 1650.[1]

In fact with the destruction of the Camera Apistolic during the sack of Rome in 1527, the capitol for Writing Masters moved to Southern France and by the turn of the century the Italic Chancery Circumflessa began to replace and was a technological refinement of the Italic Cursiva. It is this Italic Circumflessa that directly fathered the Rhonde and later English Roundhand.[1]

In England, Ayres and Shelly popularized the Round Hand while Snell is noted for his reaction to them, and warnings of restraint and proportionality. Still Edward Crocker began publishing his copybooks 40 years before the aforementioned.[1]

References
  1. ^ a b c d Joyce Irene Whalley (circa 1980). The Art of Calligraphy, Western Europe & America. 

Contibutions moved[edit]

Your previous contributions have been moved to Western calligraphy. Thanks a lot :D --Yug (talk) 07:08, 11 November 2010 (UTC)