User talk:Niels Olson

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Hyper IGM Syndromes?[edit]

Is there any chance you could work on them on subpages of your userpage until they have appreciable content? --Improv 20:05, 7 September 2006 (UTC)

Yes, but two questions: 1) how do I do that? 2) They're rare. Who's going to go looking for them? At least the very few interested parties who might go look for them, people who are also matching wits with Death, will now have a prayer of finding them. Bytes are cheap. Why not just leave them in the backwaters of the search index that they're currently in?Niels Olson 20:12, 7 September 2006 (UTC)

  • You do that by making links like this and filling out the target. As for them being rare, let people use google or something. We're not meant to be primarily a medical resource -- people with these illnesses should presumably talk to their doctor. The present articles are very difficult to tell from nonsense, consisting solely of an external link. If you can provide some better content, they might be kosher, but right now they're questionable. --Improv 12:50, 8 September 2006 (UTC)
    • Okay, I'm working on expanding them.Niels Olson 02:01, 9 September 2006 (UTC)

Whatup Niels - one o' yer classmates here. I think it's hilarious that I was reviewing the edit history of an article I had added some stuff to and saw your name... yeah, simply adding a link to an article that you create from someplace else does a lot toward making it accessible and unlikely to be deleted. When I create a new article I rarely give it more than a sentence or two, but over time they do grow so long as they're linked to. You can also make one word, say, "hormones" link to the article called "hormone" if you put the following inside double brackets: hormone|hormones. The second word will be the one that appears in blue on the page, but it'll link to the page that's specified by the first word. I don't know how to do redirects yet, but just as wikipedia continues to grow, so does our knowledge about how to tinker with it. -joey p (Cajolingwilhelm 03:49, 14 March 2007 (UTC))

Regarding empty articles[edit]

It is best to write the article or at least a sufficiently descriptive paragraph about the subject, before creating the page. Pages that consist only of links or have no context are likely to be summarily deleted. —Centrxtalk • 23:07, 10 September 2006 (UTC)

Possible idea: list pages[edit]

One idea that might work is an aggregate list page containing the diseases and a sentence on each, with its reference. Then the content is in a referenced article large enough not to be deleted.

I write new articles every now and then (a few a week maybe) and they're short, but hardly ever get nominated for deletion. My skeletal article: intro para (name of thing), para about it, an at least theoretically checkable reference citation for the content, maybe an external link, and a {{stub}} template if it's just a starter. The shortest I've done lately was two sentences and a reference. Did I mention the reference yet? ;-) - David Gerard 23:15, 10 September 2006 (UTC)

For another example, see this edit to Hyper IgM Syndrome Type 2. I didn't add any content, I just gave an intro (for context) and formatted the references. (And I must say that is an impressive looking reference.) And now it's something no-one would think of deleting out of hand. If you write the stubs to be the shape of a Wikipedia article, even if a very short one, your work will stay and the encyclopedia will be improved by its presence - David Gerard 23:24, 10 September 2006 (UTC)
Oh - and I changed the {{OMIM}} template to say what it is in the article text. I don't know what it is, but I hope that doesn't make a nonsense of it - David Gerard 23:26, 10 September 2006 (UTC)

Bacteroides fragilis move[edit]

  • I've moved the info you added to the B. fragilis entry to the root Bacteroides entry - not because we don't need a good B. fragilis entry, but because the majority of specific info (versus general Bacteroides info) has, to date, been small. IMHO, once the root entry has matured, splitting makes sense - but better to have a solid root first. -- MarcoTolo 20:55, 25 September 2006 (UTC)
  • MarcoTolo, thanks for telling me. From a consequentalist standpoint, fragilis probably merits its own page because it's responsible for so many anearobic infections. If content is lacking, my sense is the emptiness should be there to prompt others to add what they know about it. Ontologically, taxonomically, does it make sense to put subordinate-specific information in the article of a superior grouping, in this case the genus? A multiplicity of subordinates, such as B. fragilis and B. feacium exist, so it's not like the page erroneously created excess categorization. I wonder if the redirect to the genus has caused any editors to have conflated some fragilis species-specific information into the genus's page because they don't know they can edit redirects? Finally, I made the page because, as a user, I saw a need for the page. 891,000 doctors in the US alone, are going to be looking, at one time or another, for information about B. fragilis, and getting a redirect to the genus is more that a smidge distracting. It runs the risk of being misleading and thus compromising patient care.
  • Again, I'm not against a full-scale B. fragilis entry, but many microbiology/ID pages here at Wikipedia tend to drift along for months-to-years with little active. In addition, while I'm apt to be a "splitter" myself sometimes, Bacteroides is a tricky case: most reference texts lump B. fragilis and a half-dozen other species together in a non-taxonomic group called something like "B. fragilis-like pathogens" (some of which have marginal pathogenicity). Much of the problem boils down to the fact that we are just beginning to understand the genetics of Bacteroides; IIRC there have been about 10-11 new species described since 2004..... [1].
B. fragilis will have its own entry - as, hopefully, will many of the other species; I'm just suggesting that we 'grow' it as a subsection first, then drop it into place when its matured enough to avoid looking anemic on its own (and/or just duplicating the text sections common to all species). -- MarcoTolo 01:40, 27 September 2006 (UTC)

epidermodysplasia verruciformis antimicrosomal antibody test

Sopitalism[edit]

A {{prod}} template has been added to the article Sopitalism, suggesting that it be deleted according to the proposed deletion process. All contributions are appreciated, but this article may not satisfy Wikipedia's criteria for inclusion, and the deletion notice explains why (see also "What Wikipedia is not" and Wikipedia's deletion policy). You may contest the proposed deletion by removing the {{dated prod}} notice, but please explain why you disagree with the proposed deletion in your edit summary or on its talk page. Also, please consider improving the article to address the issues raised. Even though removing the deletion notice will prevent deletion through the proposed deletion process, the article may still be deleted if it matches any of the speedy deletion criteria or it can be sent to Articles for Deletion, where it may be deleted if consensus to delete is reached. If you endorse deletion of the article, and you are the only person who has made substantial edits to the page, please tag it with {{db-author}}. Rambutan (talk) 17:04, 12 September 2007 (UTC)

sopitalism[edit]

Socialism for the rich, practiced in the world today. The theory, coined by Boris Chikvashvili, goes that governments and business of the world got so closely aligned that they are in a position to treat the workers as slaves. And the method of enslavement is the printing machine. More money sloshing the world more of it goes to rich and devastates poor and (near) retired. The same concept is better illustrated by Robert Reich as a double standard with regard to moral hazard between rich and poor. References: Boris Chikvashvili, Robert Reich

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Brief history of software with emphasis on US Healthcare[edit]

Day 1: Philosophical development[edit]

Day 2: Historical and current development[edit]

handouts --> present timeline a la Lessig --> demos

Handouts[edit]

  • Ubuntu Hardy Heron CDs
  • Printed timelines

Timeline[edit]

(project headshots, trademarks, key images, key blurbs, a la Lessig, where appropriate)

  • Grand Union Flag of the East India Trading Company (see esp 1685, 1700, 1707, 1773)
  • Boston Tea Party response to the Tea Act, which was passed by efforts of Company lobby in Parliament to ease financial burden created by ongoing wars in the Company's vassal states of India. It's a tax-payer funded bailout of a monopoly that had become so powerful it influenced military affairs. Sound familiar?
  • 200 years pass . . .
  • 1958: John McCarthy discovers Lisp while at MIT. The syntactic structures bears great similarity to Noam Chomsky's syntactic structures of natural human language.
  • 1970: Dennis Ritchie developed UNIX at IBM in the early 1960s and IBM starts licensing it in 1970.
  • June 1971: Richard Stallman starts visiting the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in June 1971. Developing the still active EMACS text editor (it's main competitor for programmers is Vi).
  • January 1975: Microinstrumentation and Telemetry Systems produces the Altair 8800 microprocessor.
  • 1975: Bill Gates founds Microsoft, his product is Altair BASIC
  • February 1976: Bill Gates issues his famous Open Letter to Hobbyists in the newsletter of the Homebrew Computer Club in Palo Alto, California.
  • April 1976: While working in the calculator division of HP, Steve Wozniak and his partner Steve Jobs demo the Apple I at the Homebrew Computer Club.
  • 1976: Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman publish Diffie-Hellman key exchange, a cryptographic protocol that allows two parties that have no prior knowledge of each other to jointly establish a shared secret key over an insecure communications channel.
  • 1977: The MIT Laboratory for Computer Science institutes password protection. Richard Stallman encourages users to use a blank password. Approximately 25% of the lab goes along.
  • 1977: The Apple II is released. Five to six million would be produced before 1993, becoming the de facto standard in schools.
  • 1977: AT&T licenses Unix code to Berkeley. The Berkley Software Distribution is born.
  • Rivest, Shamir, and Adleman publish their RSA public key encryption algorithm.
  • 1979: Novell founded in UTAH to develop Control Program for Microcomputer (CP/M) applications.
  • Steve Ballmer joins Microsoft in September, 1980.
  • In 1980 MIT hacker Richard Greenblatt founds Lisp Machines. Russ Noftsker, Bill Gosper, and other MIT hackers found Symbolics. Source code becomes privatized and lab workers are asked to sign non-disclosure agreements. Stallman spends his remaining years at the lab reproducing everything Symbolics does by hand, himself, to prevent their gaining a monopoly over the lab's software.
  • IBM awards Microsoft the contract for its operating system for the upcoming "Personal Computer", which would have an Intel processor. Microsoft develops DOS based on Digital Research's Control Program for Microprocessors.
  • 1983: Richard Stallman starts the GNU project in 1983.
  • 1984: DARPA funds Honeywell to develop a branch working on secure computing. The company was spun off as Secure Computing Corporation. Its SmartFilter product is now the basis of internet censorship in the UAE, Iran, and the Great Firewall of China.
  • 1985: Richard Stallman starts the Free Software Foundation in 1985.
  • 1986: The Apple board of directors fires Steve Jobs, who founds NEXT, where he develops a new operating system based on BSD.
  • 1989: Tim Berners Lee develops the first WWW server on a NEXT box at CERN.
  • [Richard Stallman] publishes the GNU General Public License (the GNU GPL) in 1989.
  • 1990: Windows 3.0 released.
  • 1991: Guido van Rossum releases a very high level dialect of Lisp called Python. Rapidly gains favor among university students and developers for ease of learning and powerful libraries.
  • Linus Torvalds releases version 0.01 of the [Linux] kernel in 1991 and adopts the [GPL] in 1992.
  • Phil Zimmerman developed PGP (Pretty Good Privacy) in 1991 using RSA encryption to help nuclear arms protestors organize without government interference. PGP Now uses RSA and [Diffie-Hellman] algorithms. PGP has been implemented under the GPL as GPG and provides a mechanism of trust for Free & Open Source Softwae (FOSS) software packages.
  • 1993: Ian Murdock releases Debian, a complete GNU/Linux system that strictly adheres to POSIX, and all software packages are FOSS.
  • 1993: Philip Greenspun, a former Symbolics programmer who went back to MIT to earn his PhD, founds [photo.net], one of the earliest database-backed websites and online communities. His software became the core of the [ArsDigita Community system].
  • 1994: Marc Ewing releases Red Hat Linux. Bob Young and Marc Ewing collaborate to build a corporation to provide services to businesses using Linux. The current market capitalization: $400M. Related distributions include Fedora, a community-maintained desktop version of Red Hat Linux, and CentOS, a free, de-branded clone of server-side Red Hat. Many web startups use CentOS. Linus Torvalds uses a Fedora desktop.
  • 1996: Windows 95 released.
  • 1996: Eric S Raymond and Perens, a Debian project leader, write the Open Source Definition and found the Open Source Initiative.
  • 1996: Health Insurace Portability Accountability Act is enacted in the US.
  • Late 1996: Apple purchases NeXT, bringing back Steve Jobs and acquiring his new BSD-based operating system, relabeled OS X.
  • 1997: Lawrence Lessig, a former clerk for Judges Richard Posner and Antonin Scalia, and at the time teaching the law of cyberspace at Harvard Law, is appointed Special Master over the United States vs Microsoft trial.
  • 1997: The VA's VistA EMR is released. The code is open source.
  • February 1998: Netscape publishes the source code of its browser under the [Mozilla project], the board being stimulated by ideas presented in a paper by [Eric S Raymond] on his software development model the Cathedral and the Bazaar.
  • 1998: Windows 98 released
  • 18 May 1998: Novell launches ZENworks, allowing administrators to completely control entire networks of computers, including loading entirely new disk images remotely.
  • 7 September 1998: Google, a new search engine running on Linux, launches.
  • 28 October 1998: Digital Millennium Copyright Act enacted. Copyrights everything at the moment of creation and prohibits circumvention of access control measures.
  • 22 December 2000: NSA releases Security Enhanced Linux, a Mandatory Access Control suite for Linux.
  • 2001: Philip Greenspun builds a website for Edward Tufte using his ArsDigita Community system.
  • 2001: AT&T collaborates with NSA to provide all internet traffic (email, web, etc) that goes through AT&T's San Francisco Network Operations Center to NSA via special hardware. Operation continues to the present day. ref
  • October 2001: Windows XP released.
  • SANA Security produces a visual comparison of FOSS Apache and Microsoft IIS web servers.
  • 1 May 2002: Sun Microsystems releases OpenOffice, a cross-platform, MS Office-compatible suite, under the GPL.
  • 23 September 2002: the Mozilla Foundation releases Firefox, a lean yet highly secure and extensible browser that runs on all major platforms. The Mozilla Foundation license is GPL-compatible.
  • 16 December 2002: The Creative Commons Foundation, founded by Lawrence Lessig, releases the first versions of the Creative Commons licenses, intended, like the GPL, to return certain rights to the commons. Now widely used by photographers and musicians. This has provided, especially photographers, some recourse with a number of less-than-forthright advertizers who have used images from Flickr without fulfilling the requirements of the CC licenses assigned by the photographers.
  • 15 January 2003: The Supreme Court ruled against Lessig in Eldred v Ashcroft, affirming the constitutionality of laws granting retroactive extension of copyright. Copyright in the US is now granted presumptively (everything is copyrighted, from creation), and all copyrighted works are copyrighted for the life of the creator plus 70 years.
  • 14 April 2004: The HIPAA Privacy Rule comes into force. The [HIPAA security rule] specifically includes PGP as acceptable encryption on an open network but allows for unencrypted electronic transmission on closed networks. (note: network administrators tend to assume all networks are open until proven otherwise).
  • October 2004: Mark Shuttleworth starts the Ubuntu fork of Debian.
  • Nicholas Negroponte of MIT's Media Lab announces the One Laptop Per Child project, an education project intended to provide a constructivist learning environment for children in developing nations.
  • Fall 2005: Some doctors use ihealthrecord.org and related sites to create on-the-fly health records for Hurricane Katrina refugees. Later used in Hurricane Rita.
  • 2006: Google announces Google Health, to be launched in the future.
  • 9 January 2007: NSA "certifies" Windows Vista.
  • 30 January 2007: Windows Vista released after years of delays to tepid reviews. The French police force almost simultaneously announced its new computers will run Ubuntu.
  • 8 April 2007: Debian 4.0, Etch, released to wide acclaim.
  • 1 May 2007: Dell announced it will sell PCs with Ubuntu preinstalled.
  • 27 April 2007: First volley of a prolonged DDOS attack against the entire country of Estonia.
  • June 2007: Microsoft quietly distributes the COFEE thumbdrive to 350 law enforcement organizations, giving law enforcement backdoor access to Windows users' information. [ref]
  • 5 June 2007: DONCIO calls for more investment in FOSS software.
  • 18 October 2007: Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon, based on Debian Etch, released to wide acclaim. This is the version currently sold on Dells.
  • 26 October 2007: OS X Leopard released, considerable acclaim.
  • November 2007: The first OLPC XO-1 laptops are produced. A raft of low-cost laptops begin to fill the market from other companies, including the Intel Classmate and the Asus Eee PC.
  • April 2008: WorldVistA developers meet OLPC developers at the Seattle healthjam to begin work on porting VistA to OLPC, potentially providing rapidly deployable, distributable, low-cost EMR with integrated diagnostics kits for developing nations and disaster response.
  • 24 April 2008: Ubuntu Hardy Heron released, stabilizing many of the bleeding edge innovations of Gutsy Gibbon in a "Long Term Support" release. Support garunteed for 3 years.
  • 15 May 2008: Queries submitted on the open-source status of the AHLTA client and CHCS on health.mil.
  • 19 May 2008: Based on last quarter sales, Apple has 66% of the $1000+ computer market.
  • 20 May 2008: Nicholas Negroponte announces the XO2 (a hint that the OLPC project may be fairing better than some pundits think)
  • 20 May 2008: Google Health comes online.

Demos[edit]

Hardy Heron: OpenOffice, Firefox, Synaptic, make, sign, and use a PGP key, SFTP, Install, Grub, play around, answer questions OLPC XO: play around, answer questions

Proposed deletion of HIPAA compliant email postscript[edit]

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Speedy deletion of Lactation suppression[edit]

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Image copyright problem with File:Heart normal fixed gradient.svg[edit]

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Heart Graphic[edit]

Thank you, for notifying me, it seems something is wrong with the original file, I will upload a new one, because I couldn't update it Maen. K. A. (talk) 21:56, 4 April 2009 (UTC)

I Changed it, and updated the templates Maen. K. A. (talk) 22:19, 4 April 2009 (UTC)
Rock on, man, thanks. BTW, how do you put your messages on your talk page and my talk page? Is there an exteral program you use for that? Niels Olson (talk) 01:03, 5 April 2009 (UTC)
Your welcome, and about the messages, i just copy and past them before saving Maen. K. A. (talk) 08:05, 5 April 2009 (UTC)
What Revert??Maen. K. A. (talk) 17:13, 5 April 2009 (UTC)
Believe me something wrong with that file, no mater what version you chose it the gradient will remain messed, thats why i uploaded the new one Image:Heartgraphic.svg Maen. K. A. (talk) 18:40, 5 April 2009 (UTC)

Proposed deletion of Positive leadership[edit]

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Subchorionic hematoma[edit]

I noticed that a page you created, Subchorionic hematoma, hadn't been patrolled, but could use significant expansion. If you are currently working on the page, you may wish to add the (underconstruction) template. Shanata (talk) 07:55, 4 October 2009 (UTC)

I'm not sure what's more bizarre: that this article didn't exist for years, or that you created it three days before I came along! But thanks for getting it started, it's expanded a bit now, and with a bit of push it's definite WP:DYK material. Jpatokal (talk) 15:33, 6 October 2009 (UTC)

Disambiguation link notification for March 18[edit]

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Disambiguation link notification for August 29[edit]

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Your proposed merge[edit]

Niels, you suggested a template merge at Wikipedia:Proposed mergers. For templates, merges are handled at Wikipedia:Templates for discussion. The merge you proposed is now being discussed at Wikipedia:Templates for discussion/Log/2012 October 16. Ego White Tray (talk) 12:05, 16 October 2012 (UTC)

Bioluminescence[edit]

Niels, I see you added the name of a species to Bioluminescence in a reffed paragraph. However that species is not listed on the linked URL. Could you possibly either find a ref for the species, or remove it? - Thanks. Chiswick Chap (talk) 08:18, 13 December 2012 (UTC)

Ouch, sorry for the ambiguation. I moved the Lingulodium link after the citation. I think that ultimately makes more sense because Lingulodinium is a valid example, and that ref cannot be the sole ref for all examples, else your note would not exist :-) Look good to you?

Proposed deletion of Pentel PS513[edit]

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DigitalOcean[edit]

Information icon Hello, I'm Deb. I wanted to let you know that I undid one or more of your recent contributions because it appeared to be promotional. Advertising and using Wikipedia as a "soapbox" are against Wikipedia policy and not permitted. Take a look at the welcome page to learn more about Wikipedia. Thank you.

Perhaps you are not aware of the Wikipedia:Neutral point of view policy. I'm not prepared to restore the article as it stands, but you can go to Wikipedia:Deletion review if you don't feel I've acted correctly. Deb (talk) 17:41, 18 April 2014 (UTC)
Oh, BTW, you probably ought to read Wikipedia:No legal threats. I realise your off-wikipedia comments were meant to be humorous, but do take care. Deb (talk) 20:39, 20 April 2014 (UTC)

Talkback[edit]

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385446 Manwë[edit]

Glad you liked it. Not a lot is known about the composition of either object, since there are only rough estimates of the mass and radius and thus density -- but they're probably both porous ice balls. I updated the main page with what is known. Sedna17 (talk) 18:27, 23 April 2014 (UTC)

Nomination of DigitalOcean for deletion[edit]

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I'll Close My Eyes (song)[edit]

Hi and thanks for reviewing my new article I'll Close My Eyes (song). I've (since your review) linked the new article to ten existing Wikipedia articles which reference the song (i.e. made those articles refer to the new article) so it is no longer an orphan. I think there could be many other links but now I've created the article I will stand back and let other editors have at it! I also think more references could be provided but I'm a bit tired now! Thanks again for your review and suggestion. Chelseaboy (talk) 20:03, 26 April 2014 (UTC)

Semihemidemibarnstar[edit]

Original Barnstar.png Here is a semihemidemibarnstar for Adding the development of preflight checklists to the 2d Operations Group article


I did a little tweaking to your work, but it's a nice addition.

The Pulse (WP:MED newsletter) June 2014[edit]

The first edition of The Pulse has been released. The Pulse will be a regular newsletter documenting the goings-on at WPMED, including ongoing collaborations, discussions, articles, and each edition will have a special focus. That newsletter is here.

The newsletter has been sent to the talk pages of WP:MED members bearing the {{User WPMed}} template. To opt-out, please leave a message here or simply remove your name from the mailing list. Because this is the first issue, we are still finding out feet. Things like the layout and content may change in subsequent editions. Please let us know what you think, and if you have any ideas for the future, by leaving a message here.

Posted by MediaWiki message delivery (talk) 03:23, 5 June 2014 (UTC) on behalf of WikiProject Medicine.

BMJ offering 25 free accounts to Wikipedia medical editors[edit]

Neat news: BMJ is offering 25 free, full-access accounts to their prestigious medical journal through The Wikipedia Library and Wiki Project Med Foundation (like we did with Cochrane). Please sign up this week: Wikipedia:BMJ --Cheers, Ocaasi via MediaWiki message delivery (talk) 01:14, 10 June 2014 (UTC)

BMJ[edit]

Please fill out this very short form to receive your free access to BMJ's library: link to form. Cheers, Nikkimaria (talk) 03:39, 16 July 2014 (UTC)

Medical Translation Newsletter[edit]


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Wikiproject Medicine; Translation Taskforce

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Medical Translation Newsletter
Issue 1, June/July 2014
by CFCF, Doc James

sign up for monthly delivery


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This is the first of a series of newsletters for Wikiproject Medicine's Translation Task Force. Our goal is to make all the medical knowledge on Wikipedia available to the world, in the language of your choice.

note: you will not receive future editions of this newsletter unless you *sign up*; you received this version because you identify as a member of WikiProject Medicine

Spotlight - Simplified article translation


Wikiproject Medicine started translating simplified articles in February 2014. We now have 45 simplified articles ready for translation, of which the first on African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness has been translated into 46 out of ~100 languages. This list does not include the 33 additional articles that are available in both full and simple versions.

Our goal is to eventually translate 1,000 simplified articles. This includes:

We are looking for subject area leads to both create articles and recruit further editors. We need people with basic medical knowledge who are willing to help out. This includes to write, translate and especially integrate medical articles.

What's happening?


IEG grant
CFCF - "IEG beneficiary" and editor of this newsletter.

I've (CFCF) taken on the role of community organizer for this project, and will be working with this until December. The goals and timeline can be found here, and are focused on getting the project on a firm footing and to enable me to work near full-time over the summer, and part-time during the rest of the year. This means I will be available for questions and ideas, and you can best reach me by mail or on my talk page.

Wikimania 2014

For those going to London in a month's time (or those already nearby) there will be at least one event for all medical editors, on Thursday August 7th. See the event page, which also summarizes medicine-related presentations in the main conference. Please pass the word on to your local medical editors.

Integration progress

There has previously been some resistance against translation into certain languages with strong Wikipedia presence, such as Dutch, Polish, and Swedish.
What was found is that thre is hardly any negative opinion about the the project itself; and any such critique has focused on the ways that articles have being integrated. For an article to be usefully translated into a target-Wiki it needs to be properly Wiki-linked, carry proper citations and use the formatting of the chosen target language as well as being properly proof-read. Certain large Wikis such as the Polish and Dutch Wikis have strong traditions of medical content, with their own editorial system, own templates and different ideas about what constitutes a good medical article. For example, there are not MEDRS (Polish,German,Romanian,Persian) guidelines present on other Wikis, and some Wikis have a stronger background of country-specific content.

  • Swedish
    Translation into Swedish has been difficult in part because of the amount of free, high quality sources out there already: patient info, for professionals. The same can be said for English, but has really given us all the more reason to try and create an unbiased and free encyclopedia of medical content. We want Wikipedia to act as an alternative to commercial sources, and preferably a really good one at that.
    Through extensive collaborative work and by respecting links and Sweden specific content the last unintegrated Swedish translation went live in May.
  • Dutch
    Dutch translation carries with it special difficulties, in part due to the premises in which the Dutch Wikipedia is built upon. There is great respect for what previous editors have created, and deleting or replacing old content can be frowned upon. In spite of this there are success stories: Anafylaxie.
  • Polish
    Translation and integration into Polish also comes with its own unique set of challenges. The Polish Wikipedia has long been independent and works very hard to create high quality contentfor Polish audience. Previous translation trouble has lead to use of unique templates with unique formatting, not least among citations. Add to this that the Polish Wikipedia does not allow template redirects and a large body of work is required for each article.
    (This is somewhat alleviated by a commissioned Template bot - to be released). - List of articles for integration
  • Arabic
    The Arabic Wikipedia community has been informed of the efforts to integrate content through both the general talk-page as well as through one of the major Arabic Wikipedia facebook-groups: مجتمع ويكيبيديا العربي, something that has been heralded with great enthusiasm.
Integration guides

Integration is the next step after any translation. Despite this it is by no means trivial, and it comes with its own hardships and challenges. Previously each new integrator has needed to dive into the fray with little help from previous integrations. Therefore we are creating guides for specific Wikis that make integration simple and straightforward, with guides for specific languages, and for integrating on small Wikis.

Instructions on how to integrate an article may be found here [4]

News in short


To come
  • Medical editor census - Medical editors on different Wikis have been without proper means of communication. A preliminary list of projects is available here.
  • Proofreading drives

Further reading



Thanks for reading! To receive a monthly talk page update about new issues of the Medical Translation Newsletter, please add your name to the subscriber's list. To suggest items for the next issue, please contact the editor, CFCF (talk · contribs) at Wikipedia:Wikiproject Medicine/Translation Taskforce/Newsletter/Suggestions.
Want to help out manage the newsletter? Get in touch with me CFCF (talk · contribs)
For the newsletter from Wikiproject Medicine, see The Pulse

If you are receiving this newsletter without having signed up, it is because you have signed up as a member of the Translation Taskforce, or Wiki Project Med on meta. 22:32, 16 July 2014 (UTC)