User talk:Omc

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Etymology[edit]

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I want to add an etymology to an article. Is there a standard style for this? Should it be added in the intro? (Example: "Melisma (from the Greek word ....) or something like that.) If so, is there a standard format? Or in a separate Etymology or Word Origin section?

And more generally, is there a way to find out the answer to questions on Wikipedia editing without a "help me" request like this? I'm an occasional Wikipedia editor, and don't know all the ins and outs of editing. I usually find an example of what I want to do, and use that as a model. But I'm sure a lot of this has been documented in a style guide somewhere and I just don't know where to find it.

Thanks.

Omc (talk) 02:12, 15 December 2013 (UTC)

Hi, Omc – you'll find loads of info on this subject at wp:ETYMOLOGY, the linguistics page that deals with that subject. Also, since you're like many of us who find examples from which to edit, I found a search page that may interest you. It lists several articles with links to their etymology sections. This should get you started. In the future just do like I did: I typed "wp:etymology" in the Wikipedia search field to find the project, and I typed "mos:etymology" to find the search list. The search engine is your friend. Hope you thoroughly enjoy editing this encyclopedia! Joys! – Paine Ellsworth CLIMAX! 02:29, 15 December 2013 (UTC)
Face-smile.svg Thank you, Paine! Omc (talk) 09:10, 15 December 2013 (UTC)
Face-smile.svg You're welcome!, Omc! – Paine Ellsworth CLIMAX! 06:41, 16 December 2013 (UTC)

Talk pages[edit]

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I sometimes follow discussions on talk pages. Is there any way to find specifically the comments that have been added since I last looked at the page?

Thanks. Omc (talk) 17:21, 15 December 2013 (UTC)

You can use your WP:Watchlist. Martijn Hoekstra (talk) 17:37, 15 December 2013 (UTC)

A belated welcome![edit]

Sorry for the belated welcome, but the cookies are still warm! Face-smile.svg

Here's wishing you a belated welcome to Wikipedia, Omc. I see that you've already been around a while and wanted to thank you for your contributions. Though you seem to have been successful in finding your way around, you may benefit from following some of the links below, which help editors get the most out of Wikipedia:

Also, when you post on talk pages you should sign your name using four tildes (~~~~); that should automatically produce your username and the date after your post.

I hope you enjoy editing here and being a Wikipedian! If you have any questions, feel free to leave me a message on my talk page, consult Wikipedia:Questions, or place {{helpme}} on your talk page and ask your question there.

Again, welcome! George Ho (talk) 04:04, 17 January 2014 (UTC)


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How to find out who wrote specific sections of articles?[edit]

Is there any way to look at a particular passage or section in the article and see who wrote it or touched it? I know that an article's revision history can be viewed, so that eventually it would be possible to figure out who wrote specific passages - but that could take a lot of work, and it's easy to overlook what I'm looking for.

Also, on the revision history pages, what specifically does the Filter field do? What fields are considered in the filtering?

Thanks. Omc (talk) 16:41, 26 January 2014 (UTC)

Personally, I just select a part of a sentence and use the "find" in the browser to find the part - I do that on versions 100 apart (the default change on the history "next page"), then hone in once I've found the history page with the change - then try the middle then divide the next in two - just a "binary chop" on the page - until I find the revision. Obviously for pages with big histories one can do 500 apart. I've a vague felling there is another way, so I'll leave the help up. (Never found a use for the filter!) Ronhjones  (Talk) 16:51, 26 January 2014 (UTC)
Use WikiBlame. --Gryllida (talk) 17:01, 26 January 2014 (UTC)
You could also use Replay Edits but it seems only useful if you know a relatively narrow time frame to replay. --Gryllida (talk) 17:04, 26 January 2014 (UTC)

Help - Reliable sources - video clips[edit]

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I'm watching/participating a talk page discussion which has disagreement abut what's a reliable source. The article is a biography of a living person, so that the Wikipedia BLP rules apply, and the issue is whether this person's clear statement that he's gay in an online video clip from an entertainment show is a legitimate source for the "personal life" section of the Wikipedia article on that person.

Some of the commenters on the talk page invoke the "reliable sources" rules and say that the rules against using tabloid-type sources should apply. I can understand the skepticism about using written statements from a entertainment news site or blog or tabloid-type source. But even if the web page might fail the "reliable source" test, it seems to me that a statement made by the subject of the article in a video on such a page does constitute a reliable source. (The video is an excerpt from a TV game show.)

But I'm relatively new to Wikipedia and can't find a clear statement on this point. I've looked at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Verifiability#Reliable_sources. I've also looked at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Biographies_of_living_persons#Avoid_self-published_sources and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Biographies_of_living_persons#Avoid_self-published_sources. But they focus on written statements and claims, and says nothing about videos.

Can anyone help me sort this out? The question seems to be: is a video statement out of the person's mouth disqualified because it appears on questionable source?

Thanks for any help. Omc (talk) 08:49, 21 April 2014 (UTC)

The reliable sources noticeboard would be a good place for such a question. Personally I'd be rather skeptical - when we could (and do) cite the BBC and ITV News instead, there's not really a reason to cite a game show. There are also issues of undue weight; this does seem more like celebrity gossip than anything else. Huon (talk) 15:03, 21 April 2014 (UTC)