Utah Republican Party

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Utah Republican Party
Senate leader Wayne Niederhauser
House leader Becky Lockhart
Founded 1854
Headquarters 117 E. South Temple
Salt Lake City, Utah 84111
Ideology Conservatism
Fiscal conservatism
Social conservatism
National affiliation Republican Party
Colors Red
Seats in the Upper House
24 / 29
Seats in the Lower House
61 / 75
Website
www.utgop.org
Politics of the United States
Political parties
Elections

The Utah Republican Party works to nominate and support the election of Republican candidates in partisan races for public office in the state of Utah. Promote the principles of the State Party Platform and abide by the elections laws, constitution, and bylaws of the Party.

History[edit]

The state of Utah politics was reorganized after the 1890 Manifesto led by Wilford Woodruff. The 1890 Manifesto officially ended the traditionally Mormon practice of Polygamy. Many prominent polygamist Mormons were imprisoned, punished and harassed since the 1890 Manifesto prohibited plural marriage. This action granted the Utah Territory statehood in 1896 on the condition that polygamy was banned in the state constitution. The Republican Frank J. Cannon was the first delegate elected to congress by the state of Utah in 1894. The state of Utah rapidly gained overwhelming support for the Republican Party. Although the Republican Party had played a major part in abolishing polygamy, the Republican U.S. Senator Reed Smoot rose to political power. Smoot led a political alliance of Mormons and non-Mormons that created a dominant Republican party in many parts of the state. The Republican Party continued to control the state politics for the majority of the twentieth century.[1]

Constitution[edit]

The Members of the Utah Republican Party are grateful to Almighty God for life and liberty. The members desire the perpetuation of the free government principles and the blessings of liberty. The Party is governed by the Utah State Constitution, Party By-lays, and Robert's Rules of Order Current Edition.[2]

Current elected officials[edit]

The Utah Republican Party controls all five statewide offices and holds a supermajority in the Utah House of Representatives and the Utah State Senate. Republicans also hold both of the state's U.S. Senate seats and two of the state's three U.S. House seats.

Members of Congress[edit]

U.S. Senate[edit]

  • Mike Lee - Michael Shumway "Mike" Lee (born June 4, 1971) is the junior United States Senator. He is supported by the Tea Party movement.
  • Orrin Grant Hatch - (born March 22, 1934) is the senior United States Senator. Hatch served as the chairman or ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee (depending on whether the Republicans controlled the Senate) from 1993 to 2005. He previously served as chairman of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee from 1981 to 1987. He currently serves as ranking member of the Senate Finance Committee. Hatch also serves on the Board of Directors for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

U.S. House of Representatives[edit]

  • Robert William "Rob" Bishop - (born July 13, 1951) is the U.S. Representative for Utah's 1st congressional district, serving since 2003 and a member of the Tea Party Caucus.
  • Jason Chaffetz - (born March 26, 1967) is the U.S. Representative for Utah's 3rd congressional district, serving since 2009. The district is based in Provo and includes large portions of central and west-central Utah.

Statewide offices[edit]

  • Governor: Gary Richard Herbert (born May 7, 1947) The 17th Governor after having served as the sixth Lieutenant Governor of Utah from 2005 to 2009, he assumed the governorship on August 11, 2009, following the resignation of Jon Huntsman, who was appointed United States Ambassador to the People's Republic of China by President Barack Obama. Governor Herbert was elected to his own term of office in a 2010 Special Election in Utah, defeating his opponent 65%-31%.
  • Lieutenant Governor/Secretary of State: Greg S. Bell - (born October 16, 1948) is an American politician, land-use attorney, and the seventh and current Lieutenant Governor. He was a member of the Utah State Senate, representing the state's 22nd senate district in Davis County.[1] On August 5, 2009, Bell was named as then-Lt. Gov. Gary Herbert's pick to succeed him as Utah's next Lieutenant Governor. Bell took office on September 1, after being confirmed by the Utah State Senate.
  • Attorney General: Mark Shurtleff - (born August 9, 1957). He has held the position since January 2001
  • State Treasurer: Richard Ellis
  • State Auditor: Auston Johnson

State Legislature[edit]

State party organization[edit]

Office Office-holder
Chair James Evans
Vice Chair Willie Billings
Secretary Michelle Mumford
Treasurer David Crittenden
Executive Director Jeff Peterson

In off election years the Utah Republican Party holds organizing conventions where state delegate elect a chair, vice-chair, secretary and treasurer. The state party officers are elected for a term of two (2) years.

Central Committee[edit]

The State Central Committee has representatives from every county in Utah. Along with the automatic members, each county chair and vice-chair, counties are allocated representative based on the number of voting republicans in that county. These representatives are voted in by each county’s central committee which in turn is made up of precinct chairs and vice chairs elected at neighborhood caucuses.

State Party Caucuses[edit]

Party Caucuses are held every two years in Utah. The next caucus will be held Thursday, March 15, 2012 at 7:00 pm.

County party organizations[edit]

Each of Utah's 29 counties has a party organization, which operates within that county and sends delegates to the State Central Committee.

County Party Website
Cache http://cachegop.com/
Davis http://www.davisgop.com/
Salt Lake http://www.slcogop.com
Sanpete http://www.sanpetecountyrepublicans.com
Summit http://www.summitcountygop.org
Utah http://ucrp.org
Weber http://www.wcrgop.org

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]