Uterine hyperstimulation

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Uterine hyperstimulation or hypertonic uterine dysfunction is a potential complication of labor induction. It is defined as either a series of single contractions lasting 2 minutes or more or a contraction frequency of five or more in 10 minutes.[1] Uterine hyperstimulation may result in fetal heart rate abnormalities, uterine rupture, or placental abruption. It is usually treated by administering terbutaline.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Briggs GG, Wan SR (June 2006). "Drug therapy during labor and delivery, part 2". Am J Health Syst Pharm 63 (12): 1131–9. doi:10.2146/ajhp050265.p2. PMID 16754739. Retrieved 2009-08-03. , which cites:
    American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (December 1999). "Induction of labor". ACOG practice bulletin 10 (Washington, DC). 
  2. ^ Briggs GG, Wan SR (June 2006). "Drug therapy during labor and delivery, part 2". Am J Health Syst Pharm 63 (12): 1131–9. doi:10.2146/ajhp050265.p2. PMID 16754739. Retrieved 2009-08-03.