UTVA-60

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Utva 60)
Jump to: navigation, search
UTVA-60
Role Light utility/training aircraft
National origin Yugoslavia
Manufacturer UTVA
First flight 22 April 1959 (UTVA-56)[1]
Introduction 1960
Variants UTVA 65
UTVA 66

The UTVA-60 is a Yugoslavian light aircraft of the 1960s. First flying in 1959, it was built by UTVA for both the Yugoslavian armed forces and for civilian use.

Development and design[edit]

In 1959 the Yugoslav aircraft company UTVA designed and built a single-engined, high-winged light utility aircraft, the UTVA 56, a prototype first flying on 22 April 1959.[2] Testing was successful,[3] but the aircraft was redesigned for production, with a more powerful Lycoming O-480 engine, and designated the UTVA-60.[2]

The UTVA-60 is an all-metal, four-place, strut-braced high-wing monoplane. It is fitted with a fixed conventional undercarriage which uses cantilevered steel tube struts. Trailing-edge wing flaps are linked to the ailerons, drooping the ailerons when the flaps are lowered to reduce landing speed,[4] while the agricultural version's wing was fitted with slots.[2]

The UTVA-60 was used as the basis for the UTVA-65, a specialised agricultural aircraft, which used the wings, undercarriage and tail of the UTVA-60, but with a low-mounted wing. The UTVA-60 was replaced in production by the UTVA-66, a further improved version.[5]

Operational history[edit]

As well as civil use, the UTVA-60 was used by the Yugoslav Air Force, who received about 35, using them until 1982,[6] while Cambodia received four aircraft.[7][8]

Variants[edit]

UTVA-56
Prototype, powered by 194 kW (260 hp) Lycoming GO-435 engine.[2][4]
UTVA-60-AT1
Basic four seat utility version.[2]
UTVA-60-AT2
Dual control version.[2]
UTVA-60-AG
Agricultural version.[2]
UTVA-60-AM
Ambulance version.[2]
UTVA-60H
Floatplane, powered by 221 kW (296 kW) Lycoming GO-480-G1H6 engine.[2]

Operators[edit]

 Cambodia
 Croatia
 Khmer Republic
 Republika Srpska
 Yugoslavia

Specifications (UTVA-60-AT1)[edit]

Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1965-66; Mondey

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 3 passengers/2 stretchers and attendant
  • Length: 8.22 m (27 ft 0 in)
  • Wingspan: 11.40 m (37 ft 5 in)
  • Height: 2.72 m (8 ft 11 in)
  • Wing area: 18.08 m2 (194.6 sq ft)
  • Aspect ratio: 7.19
  • Airfoil: NACA 4412 (modified)
  • Empty weight: 952 kg (2,099 lb)
  • Max takeoff weight: 1,620 kg (3,571 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming O-480-G1H6 air-cooled flat-six, 201 kW (270 hp)
  • Propellers: 2-bladed Hartzell HC-A2X20-1B/10133-3 constant speed metal propeller

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 252 km/h (157 mph; 136 kn) at sea level
  • Cruising speed: 230 km/h (143 mph; 124 kn)
  • Stall speed: 73 km/h (45 mph; 39 kn)
  • Never exceed speed: 300 km/h (186 mph; 162 kn)
  • Range: 780 km (485 mi; 421 nmi)
  • Service ceiling: 5,200 m (17,060 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 6.40 m/s (1,260 ft/min)
  • Wing loading: 89.60 kg/m2 (18.35 lb/sq ft)

See also[edit]

Related development

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Mondey
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Taylor 1965, p.344.
  3. ^ "UTVA 56 / 60 Aircraft history performance and specifications". Pilotfriend. Retrieved 21 December 2009.
  4. ^ a b Flight 25 September 1959, p.305.
  5. ^ Donald 1997, p.887.
  6. ^ Hayles, John. "Yugoslavia Air Force: Aircraft Types". Aeroflight. 1 July 2004. Retrieved 21 December 2009.
  7. ^ Forsgren, Jan. "Aviation Royale Khmere/Khmer Air Force Aircraft". Aeroflight. 22 April 2007. Retrieved 21 December 2009.
  8. ^ Grandolini 1988, p. 43.

References[edit]

  • Donald, David (ed.) The Encyclopedia of World Aircraft. Leicester, UK: Blitz Editions, 1997. ISBN 1-85605-375-X.
  • Grandolini, Albert. "L'Aviation Royale Khmere: The first 15 years of Cambodian military aviation". Air Enthusiast, Thirty-seven, September-December 1988. Bromley, UK:Fine Scroll. issn 0143-5450. pp. 39–47 .
  • Sport and Business Flight, 25 September 1959, p. 305.
  • Taylor, John W. R. Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1965-66. London: Samson Low, Marston, 1965.
  • Mondey, David, Encyclopedia of The World's Commercial and Private Aircraft, Crescent Books, New York NY (1981), p. 241


External links[edit]