Uwe Bein

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Uwe Bein
Uwe Bein.jpg
Personal information
Full name Uwe Bein
Date of birth (1960-09-26) 26 September 1960 (age 53)
Place of birth Heringen, West Germany
Height 1.81 m (5 ft 11 12 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
1968–1975 TSV Lengers
1975–1978 VfB Heringen[1]
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1978–1984 Kickers Offenbach 153 (72)
1984–1987 1. FC Köln 64 (17)
1987–1989 Hamburger SV 52 (22)
1989–1994 Eintracht Frankfurt 150 (38)
1994–1997 Urawa Red Diamonds 68 (25)
1997–1998 VfB Gießen 22 (12)
Total 509 (186)
National team
1983 West Germany Olympic 2 (0)
1989–1993 Germany 17 (3)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Uwe Bein (born 26 September 1960 in Heringen) is a former German footballer.[2]

Although, due to his reserved nature, he was never able to gain large public fame, his fans and experts call him one of the most technically gifted German midfielders of his time. In his heyday Bein was regarded as the best German player to play the deadly pass.

Bein's professional career began in 1978 with Kickers Offenbach, before he moved to 1. FC Köln, Hamburger SV and Eintracht Frankfurt. He played over 300 Bundesliga games and scored 91 goals in total. He also helped Köln to the 1986 UEFA Cup Final where his goal could not prevent them losing to Real Madrid. In 1994 he moved to Japan and started playing for Urawa Red Diamonds in 1996. In 1997 he made appearances for VfB Gießen.

The biggest success in Bein's career occurred during the 1990 FIFA World Cup, where he played four of seven games before suffering from an injury. He scored one goal in the 5–1 win over the United Arab Emirates. He started all three group matches plus the quarter final against Czechoslovakia but didn't play in the final.

He didn't take part in the Euro 92. Lacking support from the German head coach Berti Vogts, Bein finally retired from the national team in 1993, and thus didn't take part in the World Cup 1994.

In total, he played 17 international matches, with three goals to his credit.

After his playing career ended he managed for half a year Kickers Offenbach in 2005.[3]

Statistics[edit]

[4]

Club performance League Cup League Cup Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Germany League DFB-Pokal DFB Ligapokal Total
1979–80 Kickers Offenbach 2. Bundesliga 9 1 9 1
1980–81 38 25 38 25
1981–82 35 12 35 12
1982–83 37 20 37 20
1983–84 Bundesliga 34 14 34 14
1984–85 Köln 27 8 27 8
1985–86 20 5 20 5
1986–87 17 4 17 4
1987–88 Hamburger SV 24 7 24 7
1988–89 28 15 28 15
1989–90 Eintracht Frankfurt 33 9 33 9
1990–91 31 8 31 8
1991–92 34 8 34 8
1992–93 25 7 25 7
1993–94 27 6 27 6
Japan League Emperor's Cup J. League Cup Total
1994 Urawa Red Diamonds J. League 1 10 2 0 0 2 0 12 2
1995 38 18 3 2 - 41 20
1996 20 5 4 2 7 1 31 8
Country Germany 419 149 419 149
Japan 68 25 7 4 9 1 84 30
Total 487 174 7 4 9 1 503 179
Germany national team
Year Apps Goals
1989 2 0
1990 10 3
1991 1 0
1992 1 0
1993 3 0
Total 17 3

International goals[edit]

Scores and results table. Germany's goal tally first:
Goal Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 26 May 1990 Rheinstadion, Düsseldorf, Germany  Czechoslovakia 1–0 1–0 Friendly
2. 15 June 1990 Stadio Giuseppe Meazza, Milan, Italy  United Arab Emirates 4–1 5–1 1990 FIFA World Cup Group D
3. 31 October 1990 Josy Barthel Stadium, Luxembourg  Luxembourg 3–0 3–2 UEFA Euro 1992 qualifying

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bein, Uwe" (in German). kicker.de. Retrieved 22 May 2010. 
  2. ^ "Uwe Bein". worldfootball.net. Retrieved 22 May 2010. 
  3. ^ "Was macht eigentlich ... Uwe Bein?" (in German). DFL. Retrieved 22 May 2010. 
  4. ^ Uwe Bein at National-Football-Teams.com

External links[edit]