V-Battalion

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V-Battalion
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance Comedy Comics #9 (1942)
(Golden Age)
Thunderbolts vol. 1 #27 (1999)
(modern age)
In-story information
Type of organization Freedom fighters
Agent(s) Betty Barstow
Paulette Brazee
Fred Davis Jr.
Destroyer
Brian Falsworth
Jacqueline Falsworth-Crichton
Madelyn Joyce Frank
Robert Frank
Robert Frank, Jr.
Helmut Grueler
Thomas Halloway
Jim Hammond
Irene Martinez
Isadora Martinez
Darren Mitchell
Davy Mitchell
Rebel Ralston
Dallas Riordan
Gwenny Lou Sabuki
Hjiri "Sam" Sabuki
Ameiko Sabuki
John Watkins Sr.

The V-Battalion is the name of two incarnations of a fictional secret organization composed of Golden Age superheroes and their descendents in stories from Marvel Comics. The organization featured prominently in the original Thunderbolts series and The New Invaders.

Publication history[edit]

There have been two limited series prominently featuring the V-Battalion, Citizen V and the V-Battalion and Citizen V and the V-Battalion: The Everlasting

Fictional biography[edit]

Golden Age[edit]

The group was originally a British agency formed in World War II to fight Nazis.[1] The lead agent of the organization was John Watkins. However, in his superhero alter-ego, Citizen V, he was strangled to death by Heinrich Zemo. In time Heinrich hunted down and murdered most if not all of the original organization. Citizen V's pregnant lover Paulette Brazee was kept in hiding to protect her and her unborn child. She would later give birth to a son named John (JJ) Watkins, Jr. and marry a soldier she met in Europe. In time both Paulette and JJ took up the mantle as Citizen V as well as JJ's son John Watkins III.

Modern Age[edit]

With the original organization destroyed, a group of golden age heroes choose to reconstitute the group, including Roger Aubrey (the Destroyer), Betty Barstow (Silver Scorpion) and Helmut Grueler (Iron Cross). The organization operated out of the Symkaria and one of their primary missions was to hunt down Nazi war criminals.

The V Battalion remained a secret organization for many decades. When the Thunderbolts came onto the scene the V Battalion were interested in the fact that there was a new Citizen V claiming to be the previously unknown grandson of the original Citizen V. The V Battalion used a mole named Miles Warton (aka Miles Warbeck) that they had placed in the New York City mayor's office. The NYC mayor had appointed Dallas Riordan to be the Thunderbolts liaison (the mayor wanted to be closely affiliated with the new superheroes after the supposed deaths of the Avengers and Fantastic Four). Miles's job was to monitor Dallas.

Eventually it was revealed that the Thunderbolts were actually the Masters of Evil and that the new Citizen V was none other than Helmut Zemo, the son of Heinrich Zemo, the man who had murdered the original Citizen V and most of the original V Battalion. Shortly after this V Battalion leader Roger Aubrey offered Dallas the mantle of Citizen V. Dallas was offered the role because her paternal grandfather was one of the early members of the reconstituted V Battalion and he gave his life in service of the V Battalion. Dallas began hunting the Thunderbolts using the cover story that she was the granddaughter of the original Citizen V (she was not). After a few adventures (including being framed as the second Crimson Cowl and imprisoned)[2] Dallas left the V Battalion after she was ordered to assassinate Henry Peter Gyrich.[3] The V Battalion tried to prevent Dallas from spilling their secrets to the Thunderbolts. Before Dallas could do so, she was teleported away by the Crimson Cowl but not before a skirmish between the V Battalion and the Thunderbolts ensued.[4]

Dallas was left crippled and a captive in Latveria[5] after her fight with the Crimson Cowl. Soon afterwards the actual grandson of the original Citizen V awoke from a 5 year coma in England. John Watkins III then became Citizen V. John went on to lead the Redeemers.[6] Eventually it was discovered that Helmut Zemo, who was thought to be deceased after a battle with Scourge, had his mind downloaded into Watkins body as a result of a prank played by the Thunderbolt member Techno.

Helmut then began serving in the V Battalion, his enemies unaware of his true identity. Eventually, Helmut was removed from John's body and John chose to remain as Citizen V.[7] The Battalion would then go on to opposed Marduk, the Collective Man and Flag-Smasher,[8] after which they lost their ship/base the Vanguard[9]

Eventually, Roger Aubrey chose to leave the V Battalion after a battle with the evil god Marduk. He appointed Jim Hammond the original Human Torch as his successor.[10]

Membership[edit]

V-Battalion[edit]

Penance Council[edit]

  • Tom Halloway (Angel)
  • Fred Davis (Bucky)
  • Golden Sun
  • Golden Woman
  • Goldfire
  • David Mitchell (Human Top)
  • Iron Cross
  • Irene Martinez
  • Isadora Martinez
  • Roger Aubrey (Destroyer)
  • Miss America
  • Nuklo
  • Elizabeth Barstow (Silver Scorpion)
  • Topspin
  • Twister
  • Brian Falsworth (Union Jack)
  • Whizzer

Details[edit]

  • The V Battalion activities are governed by the Penance Council. The Penance council is composed of several golden age heroes and their descendants.
  • The V Battalion used a powerful stealth ship called the Vanguard. The Vanguard uses technology reverse engineered from several alien civilizations.
  • The V Battalion's primary base was Castle Masada in Sykaria.
  • The V Battalion comprises several hundred non-powered agents who are not former superheroes.

Appearances[edit]

  • Comedy Comics Vol. 1 #3
  • Thunderbolts #40-75
  • Captain America/Citizen V 1998 annual
  • Citizen V and the V-Battalion #1-3
  • Citizen V and the V-Battalion: The Everlasting #1-4

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Comedy Comics #9
  2. ^ Thunderbolts vol. 1 #27
  3. ^ Thunderbolts vol. 1 #35
  4. ^ Thunderbolts vol. 1 #38
  5. ^ Thunderbolts vol. 1 #40
  6. ^ Thunderbolts vol. 1 #45
  7. ^ Citizen V and the V-Battalion #3
  8. ^ Citizen V and the V-Battalion: The Everlasting #1
  9. ^ Thunderbolts vol. 1 #75
  10. ^ New Invaders #2
  11. ^ Thunderbolts #15
  12. ^ Thunderbolts #45
  13. ^ New Invaders #10
  14. ^ Giant-Sized Avengers #1
  15. ^ Vision and Scarlet Witch #3

References[edit]