V.A.M.P. (G.I. Joe)

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The V.A.M.P. is a fictional vehicle from the G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero toyline, comic books and cartoon series.

Toys[edit]

V.A.M.P. Mark II

The V.A.M.P. (Vehicle: Attack: Multi Purpose) was first released in 1982.[1] Packaged with the action figure Clutch, the design was essentially a Jeep, with dual-mounted 7.62mm machine guns that swiveled and elevated.[2] The V.A.M.P. Mark II was released in 1984 with a tan-painted Clutch,[3] and instead of the original's green color and twin machine guns, it too was painted tan and equipped with a quad-mount missile launcher (carrying the fictional Stinger XK-1 missile).[4] A Sears exclusive included the V.A.M.P. four-wheeled drive vehicle with the HAL artillery laser.[3] The design of the V.A.M.P. was influenced by the Lamborghini Cheetah prototype.[citation needed]

In 1988, the V.A.M.P. Mark II was repainted and renamed the "Tiger Sting" for the Tiger Force sub-team.[5]

The 2007 version, which lacked the rear guns, was a G.I. Joe convention exclusive.[6] It had a release in 2008, with the figure 'Doubleclutch' (a version of the original), its filecard describes the vehicle being used in attacking Cobra Island.[7]

Comics[edit]

The vehicle debuts in the first issue of Marvel Comics G.I. Joe series. It is utilized in an invasion of an island fortress, where Cobra is holding a nuclear physicist. All the Joe's vehicles, including Steeler's M.O.B.A.T., are abandoned due to trickery on the part of Cobra Commander. The soldiers are forced to leave in an enemy aircraft; the Commander's bomb destroys the fortress, the vehicles and much of the surrounding island.[8]

A V.A.M.P. is featured in issue 7, where it is revealed it has a remote control device for its weaponry. When Cobra forces capture the Joes and their temporary allies, the Oktober Guard, all the soldiers are lined up in front of a makeshift firing squad. Clutch uses the remote to kill the squad; everyone else escapes.[9] He later uses the V.A.M.P.'s radio to knock out a Cobra trooper who tried to sneak up on him.[volume & issue needed]

The V.A.M.P. is utilized again in defense of Cape Canaveral and the space shuttle.[10]

Clutch drives the V.A.M.P. as missile-bait in issue 19. The vehicle, driver and passengers are unscathed, the purpose of the baiting was to destroy a makeshift fortress and convince Cobra they had eliminated the real Joe Headquarters.[11] A V.A.M.P. is used in defense of McGuire Air Force Base, after the Dreadnoks spotted a Dragonfly landing there.[12]

Cartoon[edit]

The V.A.M.P. first appears in the "Real American Hero" mini-series.[13]

Both V.A.M.P.s and V.A.M.P. Mark IIs appear in the "Revenge of Cobra" mini-series. During the Joes' defense of Washington DC, a V.A.M.P. is picked up by the high winds and smashes into a bank of energy mirrors. Gung-Ho later drives a V.A.M.P. Mk.2 during the assault on Cobra Temple.

V.A.M.P.s are featured in the Sunbow G.I. Joe cartoon episode, 'The Battle For The Train of Gold'.[14]

A more futuristic version of the V.A.M.P. driven by Long Range appears in the G.I. Joe Sigma 6 cartoon.

Video game[edit]

The V.A.M.P. Mark II is featured in the 1985 G.I. Joe computer game.[15]

References[edit]

  • Hidalgo, Pablo (2009). G.I. Joe vs. Cobra: The Essential Guide 1982-2008. Random House. ISBN 978-0-345-51642-8. 
  • Bellomo, Mark (2009). The Ultimate Guide to G.I. Joe 1982-1994. Krause Publications. ISBN 978-0-89689-922-3. 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Bellomo, Mark (2005). The Ultimate Guide to G.I. Joe 1982-1994. Krause Publications. p. 18. ISBN 978-0-89689-922-3. 
  2. ^ Santelmo, Vincent (1994). The Official 30th Anniversary Salute To G.I. Joe 1964-1994. Krause Publications. p. 95. ISBN 0-87341-301-6. 
  3. ^ a b Santelmo, Vincent (1994). The Official 30th Anniversary Salute To G.I. Joe 1964-1994. Krause Publications. p. 100. ISBN 0-87341-301-6. 
  4. ^ Bellomo, Mark (2005). The Ultimate Guide to G.I. Joe 1982-1994. Krause Publications. p. 45. ISBN 978-0-89689-922-3. 
  5. ^ Bellomo, Mark (2005). The Ultimate Guide to G.I. Joe 1982-1994. Krause Publications. p. 155. ISBN 978-0-89689-922-3. 
  6. ^ "2007 information". Yojoe.com. Retrieved 2012-09-17. 
  7. ^ "2008 release information". Yojoe.com. Retrieved 2012-09-17. 
  8. ^ G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #1 (June 1982)
  9. ^ G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #7 (Jan. 1983)
  10. ^ G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #8 (February 1983)
  11. ^ G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #19 (January 1984)
  12. ^ G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero #30 (December 1984)
  13. ^ Erickson, Hal (2005). Television cartoon shows: an illustrated encyclopedia, 1949 through 2003, Volume 1. McFarland & Co. p. 376. ISBN 978-0-7864-2099-5. 
  14. ^ "The Battle For The Train of Gold". G.I. Joe: A Real American Hero. Season 1. Episode 23. 16 October 1985.
  15. ^ Roberts, Matt. "G.I. Joe for Personal Computers". YoJoe.com. Retrieved 2010-03-20.