Val Perovic

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Val Perovic
Personal information
Full name Vladimir Perovic
Date of birth (1953-09-25) 25 September 1953 (age 61)
Place of birth Croatia, Yugoslavia
Original team North Ballarat (BFL)
Height/Weight 1.92m / 88 kg
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1973-1979
1980-1985
Total
St Kilda
Carlton
077 (12)
097 0(1)
174 (13)
1 Playing statistics correct to end of 1985 season.

Vladimir "Val" Perovic (Croatian: Perović) (born 25 September 1953) is a former Australian rules footballer who played with St Kilda and Carlton in the VFL.

Born in Croatia (at the time part of Yugoslavia), Perovic emigrated to Ballarat in Australia with his family in 1958, at the age of four.[1] Despite starting his career as a wingman, Perovic played mostly as a defender and was a centre half-back when he first represented Victoria in 1978. After 77 games with St Kilda during the 1970s he moved to Carlton in a trade involving Alex Jesaulenko. He was a member of Carlton premiership teams in 1981 and 1982, playing in the back pocket.[2]

Perovic was noted for his long left-foot kicks. During his time at Carlton, fans would shout "woof!" every time he kicked the ball. Perovic was the first Carlton player whose kicks were acknowledged in this way. This chant, originally based on the crowd mimicking a grunt that Perovic would make when kicking the ball, has since become a traditional chant bestowed upon later long-kicking left-footed Carlton players, specifically: Ang Christou in the 1990s, Chris Bryan in the 2000s, and Matthew Watson in the 2010s.[3]

Perovic often polled well in the Brownlow Medal, finishing as St Kilda's top vote getter in the 1978 award[4] and twice for Carlton which included an eight placing in 1983.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Val Perovic – Blueseum. Retrieved 12 May 2012.
  2. ^ Holmesby, Russell; Main, Jim: The Encyclopedia of AFL Footballers: every AFL/VFL player since 1897.
  3. ^ "Bringing back the "WOOF!"". Carlton Football Club. 18 Jul 2011. Retrieved 18 Jul 2011. 
  4. ^ 1978 Brownlow Medal
  5. ^ 1983 Brownlow Medal

External links[edit]