Val de Cans International Airport

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Belém/Val-de-Cães –Júlio Cezar Ribeiro International Airport
Aeroporto Internacional de Belém/Val de Cans–Júlio Cezar Ribeiro
Valdecaes.JPG
IATA: BELICAO: SBBE
Summary
Airport type Public/Military
Operator Infraero
Serves Belém
Elevation AMSL 17 m / 56 ft
Coordinates 01°23′05″S 048°28′44″W / 1.38472°S 48.47889°W / -1.38472; -48.47889Coordinates: 01°23′05″S 048°28′44″W / 1.38472°S 48.47889°W / -1.38472; -48.47889
Website Infraero BEL
Map
BEL is located in Brazil
BEL
BEL
Location in Brazil
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
06/24 2,800 9,186 Asphalt
02/20 1,830 6,004 Asphalt
Statistics (2013)
Passengers 3,475,611
Aircraft Operations 54,008
Metric tonnes of cargo 33,009
Statistics: Infraero[1]
Sources: Airport Website,[2] ANAC[3]

Belém/Val de Cans–Júlio Cezar Ribeiro International Airport (IATA: BELICAO: SBBE) is the main airport serving Belém, Brazil. Val de Cans (sometimes spelled Val de Cães) is the name of the neighborhood where the airport is located. Since 13 April 2010 the airport is named also after Júlio Cezar Ribeiro de Souza (1837–1887) a researcher of balloons.[4]

It is operated by Infraero.

Some of its facilities are shared with Belém Air Force Base of the Brazilian Air Force.

History[edit]

In 1934 General Eurico Gaspar Dutra, then the Director of the Military Aviation, appointed Lieutenant Armando Sierra de Menezes to choose in Val de Cans a site where an airport was to be built. The Directorate of Civil Aeronautics, an agency of the Ministry of Traffic and Public Works, would be in charge of the work. Val de Cans began its history as land track running along the east/west axis with 1,200m. The facility comprised a courtyard, a hangar and a parking structure of concrete for military aircraft, which later became known as "Yellow Hangar."

With the outbreak of World War II air bases and airports located on the Brazilian coast became immensely important in the support of transportation of aircraft, personnel and equipment across the South Atlantic Ocean to Sierra Leone in West Africa. These facilities provided the necessary logistical support for the thousands of planes that, manufactured in Canada and the United States were moved to North Africa and Europe. After protracted negotiations between Brazil and the United States, airstrips were built at Belém for the Air Transport Command with two runways measuring 1,500 x 45 meters on a basis of concrete and asphalt and comprising modern airport facilities, able to meet efficiently civil aviation and military needs. Val de Cans and other air bases used by the Americans during World War II were returned to the Ministry of Aeronautics in 1945.

Panair do Brasil, Pan American, and NAB – Navegação Aérea Brasileira began their activities at Val de Cans building their stations and providing services to passengers. In 1958, the Ministry of Aeronautics began building the first passenger terminal for general airline use, which was opened on 24 January 1959. It was then administered by the Department of Civil Aviation. In 1974 its administration was transferred to Infraero.

The original passenger terminal complex underwent major renovation and expansion, which was completed in 2001: in 1999 a brand-new passenger terminal located at the side of the old terminal was built and after its opening, the old terminal was demolished to give place for an extension to the new terminal. This new extended terminal greatly increased the comfort and area available to passengers by adding 6 jetways.

Airlines and destinations[edit]

Airlines Destinations
Azul Brazilian Airlines Altamira, Belo Horizonte-Confins, Campinas, Carajás, Fortaleza, Itaituba, Macapá, Manaus, Marabá, Palmas, Porto de Trombetas, Recife, Rio de Janeiro-Santos Dumont, Salvador da Bahia, Santarém, São Luís, São Paulo-Guarulhos, Tucuruí
Gol Airlines Brasília, Cruzeiro do Sul, Fortaleza, Macapá, Manaus, Marabá, Porto Velho, Recife, Rio Branco, Rio de Janeiro-Galeão, Salvador da Bahia, Santarém, São Luís, São Paulo-Congonhas, São Paulo-Guarulhos
MAP Linhas Aéreas Altamira, Itaituba, Manaus, Parintins, Santarém
SETE Linhas Aéreas Altamira, Araguaína, Carajás, Conceição do Araguaia, Goiânia, Itaituba, Marabá, Monte Dourado, Ourilândia do Norte, Palmas, Redenção, Santarém
Surinam Airways Cayenne, Paramaribo-Johan Pengel
TAM Airlines Aracaju, Brasília, Curitiba, Fortaleza, Macapá, Manaus, Marabá, Miami, Porto Alegre, Porto Velho, Recife, Rio de Janeiro-Galeão, Salvador da Bahia, Santarém, São Luís, São Paulo-Guarulhos
TAP Portugal Lisbon

Accidents and incidents[edit]

Accidents[edit]

  • 14 July 1948: an Aerovias Brasil Douglas C-47A-70-DL registration PP-AVO doing a cargo flight, crashed and caught fire after taking-off from Belém-Val de Cans. All 5 passengers and crew died.[5]
  • 1 December 1955: a Cruzeiro do Sul Douglas C-47B-28-DK registration PP-CCC after take off from Belém-Val de Cans lost power on engine no.1. Consequent technical problems led the aircraft to lose altitude and the left wing struck a tree and broke off. The aircraft stalled, hit the ground and caught fire. All 6 passengers and crew died.[6]
  • 16 January 1958: a Cruzeiro do Sul cargo Fairchild C-82A-FA Packet registration PP-CEF crashed near Belém-Val de Cans when no.1 engine caught fire after take-off. The crew of 3 died.[7]
  • 11 August 1958: a Lóide Aéreo Nacional Douglas DC-4 registration PP-LEQ crashed for unknown causes over Carapí Island, Pará while on a night time visual approach to Belém-Val de Cans. Of the 11 passengers and crew aboard, 1 passenger survived.[8][9]
  • 6 May 1959: a Paraense Curtiss C-46/Super C-46 Commando registration PP-BTA crashed shortly after take-off from Belém-Val de Cans. Three crew members died.[10][11]
  • 22 September 1960: a Paraense Curtiss C-46/Super C-46 Commando registration PP-BTF crashed shortly after take-off from Belém-Val de Cans. Seven occupants died.[12][13]
  • 14 December 1962: a Panair do Brasil Lockheed L-049 Constellation registration PP-PDE en route from Belém-Val de Cans to Manaus-Ponta Pelada crashed in the jungle, during a night approach, due to unknown causes, approximately 45 km from Manaus at the location of Paraná da Eva. All 50 passengers and crew died.[14][15]
  • 14 March 1970: a Paraense Fairchild Hiller FH-227B registration PP-BUF operating flight 903 from São Luiz to Belém-Val de Cans, while on final approach to land, crashed into Guajará Bay. Of the 40 passengers and crew, 3 survived.[16][17]
  • 24 February 1981: a VOTEC Embraer EMB110P Bandeirante registration PT-GLB flying from Tucuruí to Belém-Val de Cans collided with a ship in dry dock while approaching Belém in rain and high winds. The aircraft subsequently struck two barges and broke in two. The front part crashed onto a tug, and the tail section sank. Only 3 passengers of a total of 14 passengers and crew survived.[18]
  • 3 September 1989: a Varig Boeing 737–241 registration PP-VMK operating flight 254 flying from São Paulo-Guarulhos to Belém-Val de Cans with intermediate stops, crashed near São José do Xingu while on the last leg of the flight between Marabá and Belém due to a pilot navigational error, which led to fuel exhaustion and a subsequent belly landing into the jungle, 450 miles (724 km) southwest of Marabá. Out of 54 occupants, there were 13 fatalities, all of them passengers. The survivors were discovered two days later.[19][20]

Incident[edit]

Access[edit]

The airport is located 12 km (7 mi) from downtown Belém.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Movimento operacional da rede Infraero de janeiro a dezembro de 2013" (in Portuguese). Infraero. 4 February 2014. Retrieved 15 July 2014. 
  2. ^ "Aeroporto Internacional de Belém/Val-de-Cans/Júlio Cezar Ribeiro" (in Portuguese). Infraero. 
  3. ^ "Lista de aeródromos públicos" (in Portuguese). ANAC. 
  4. ^ "Lei n˚12.228, de 13 de abril de 2010" (in Portuguese). Lei Direto. 14 April 2010. Retrieved 9 June 2011. 
  5. ^ "Accident description PP-AVO". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 23 June 2011. 
  6. ^ "Accident description PP-CCC". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 23 June 2011. 
  7. ^ "Accident description PP-CEF". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 24 June 2011. 
  8. ^ "Accident description PP-LEQ". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 22 June 2011. 
  9. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "O senhor do céu". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. p. 164. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  10. ^ "Accident description PP-BTA". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 24 June 2011. 
  11. ^ Pereira, Aldo (1987). Breve História da Aviação Comercial Brasileira (in Portuguese). Rio de Janeiro: Europa. p. 319. 
  12. ^ "Accident description PP-BTF". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 25 June 2011. 
  13. ^ Pereira, Aldo (1987). Breve História da Aviação Comercial Brasileira (in Portuguese). Rio de Janeiro: Europa. p. 319. 
  14. ^ "Accident description PP-PDE". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 25 June 2011. 
  15. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Um rastro na selva". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 223–228. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  16. ^ "Accident description PP-BUF". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 20 May 2011. 
  17. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "O fim da Paraense". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 267–268. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  18. ^ "Accident description PT-GLB". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 7 June 2011. 
  19. ^ "Accident description PP-VMK". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 25 June 2011. 
  20. ^ Germano da Silva, Carlos Ari César (2008). "Rumo errado". O rastro da bruxa: história da aviação comercial brasileira no século XX através dos seus acidentes 1928–1996 (in Portuguese) (2 ed.). Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS. pp. 352–360. ISBN 978-85-7430-760-2. 
  21. ^ "Incident description 8 October 1969". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 14 August 2011. 
  22. ^ "Incident description 12 November 1969". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 15 August 2011. 
  23. ^ "Incident description 4 July 1970". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 30 July 2011. 
  24. ^ "Incident description 3 February 1984". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 4 August 2011. 

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

External links[edit]

Media related to Val de Cans International Airport at Wikimedia Commons