Valbo

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Valbo
Official logo of Valbo
Coat of arms
Valbo is located in Sweden
Valbo
Valbo
Coordinates: 60°39′N 17°02′E / 60.650°N 17.033°E / 60.650; 17.033Coordinates: 60°39′N 17°02′E / 60.650°N 17.033°E / 60.650; 17.033
Country Sweden
Province Gästrikland
County Gävleborg County
Municipality Gävle Municipality
Area[1]
 • Total 8.24 km2 (3.18 sq mi)
Population (31 December 2010)[1]
 • Total 7,065
 • Density 858/km2 (2,220/sq mi)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)

Valbo is a locality situated in Gävle Municipality, Gävleborg County, Sweden with 7,065 inhabitants in 2010.[1] It is situated south-west of Gävle itself and could be considered a suburb of the city.

Valbo is known for the large shopping mall Valbo köpcentrum and for being the birthplace for the Nobel Prize laureate The (Theodor) Svedberg.

Valbo parish[edit]

Coat of arms.

Valbo is also a parish within the Church of Sweden, which has 11,600 members in the town and surrounding area in the eastern part of Gävle Municipality.

Education[edit]

  • Sofiedalskolan (Sofiedal School) Is an upper (senior) level of compulsory school and it's located in the central parts of Valbo and it has around 550 students, The school also have an intermediate level and also the first three years of compulsory school for students.
  • Ludvigsbergsskolan (Ludvigsberg School) is located in the central parts of Valbo and it has the first three years of compulsory school for students and also an intermediate level. The school has around 400 students.
  • Alborga skola (Alborga School) is located in the north of Valbo and it has the first three years of compulsory school for students with about 100 students

Häcklingeskolan (Häcklinge School) was closed in 2005 and the students were transferred to the Sofiedal school

Sports[edit]

The following sports clubs are located in Valbo:

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Tätorternas landareal, folkmängd och invånare per km2 2005 och 2010" (in Swedish). Statistics Sweden. 14 December 2011. Archived from the original on 10 January 2012. Retrieved 10 January 2012.