Valentine Pelka

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Valentine Pelka
Born (1956-02-23) 23 February 1956 (age 58)
Dewsbury, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, UK
Occupation Actor
Years active 1983-present

Valentine Pelka (born 23 February 1956) is an English actor who has starred in film and on television.

Biography[edit]

Pelka was born in Dewsbury, West Riding of Yorkshire, to a Polish civil engineer father and an Irish actress mother,[1][2][3] and attended St Michael's College, Leeds (now part of Mount St Mary's Catholic High School, Leeds). His sister, Kazia, is an actress who starred on Brookside, among other television programmes.

He has made guest appearances on Highlander: The Series as Kronos, an enemy of Duncan MacLeod (Adrian Paul) and former acolyte of Methos (Peter Wingfield) in the episodes "Comes a Horseman", "Revelations 6:8", "Archangel", and "Not To Be". He starred in the 1986 TV series Crossbow (UK, William Tell) as Roland.

He also guest starred in the 1990 TV series Zorro in the episode "All that Glitters" which preceded his starring role as the military governor, Colonel Montoya, in the 2000 syndicated TV series Queen of Swords. Peter Wingfield also co-starred as Dr Robert Helm. The part of Montoya was written for Pelka by executive producer David Abramowitz who in October 1999 offered him the part subject to approval by the other show producers.[4]

In 1999, he starred in the British TV soap opera Family Affairs as Simon Thornton. His sister, Kazia, was also a leading player in Family Affairs; however, that was after Valentine had appeared in the soap opera. Of the feature films in which Valentine has performed, the best-known was Roman Polanski's 2002 film The Pianist. His supporting comedic role in Under the Tuscan Sun was performed mute. He returned to stage work in 2013 when he reprised his role as John Lennon in Sandy Marshall's biopic And In the End at the Jeremy Street Theatre in London.[5]

Family[edit]

His is married and has one child.

Filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Valentine Pelka on trying to inject some humanity into Governor Montoya". TV Zone Special #40 (Sword and Sorcery Special) 40: 89. 1 February 2001. 
  2. ^ "Valentine Pelka profile". Yorkshire Evening Post. 20 February 1998. 
  3. ^ "Valentine Pelka profile". Impact. April 2001. 
  4. ^ "Valentine Pelka on trying to inject some humanity into Governor Montoya". TV Zone Special # 40 (Sword and Sorcery Special) 40: 89. 1 February 2001. 
  5. ^ Shilling, Jane (13 May 2013). "And In the End, The Death and Life of John Lennon, Jermyn Street Theatre, review". The Telegraph. Retrieved 25 May 2013. 

External links[edit]