Chambers County, Alabama

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Valley, AL µSA)
Jump to: navigation, search
Chambers County, Alabama
Chambers County, AL Courthouse (NRHP).JPG
County Courthouse in Lafayette in 2012
Map of Alabama highlighting Chambers County
Location in the state of Alabama
Map of the United States highlighting Alabama
Alabama's location in the U.S.
Founded December 18, 1832
Named for Henry H. Chambers
Seat Lafayette
Largest city Valley
Area
 • Total 603 sq mi (1,562 km2)
 • Land 597 sq mi (1,546 km2)
 • Water 6.6 sq mi (17 km2), (1.1%)
Population
 • (2010) 34,215
 • Density 57/sq mi (22/km²)
Congressional district 3rd
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.chamberscounty.com

Chambers County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census the population was 34,215.[1] Its county seat is Lafayette. Its name is in honor of Henry H. Chambers,[2] who served as a United States Senator from Alabama.

Chambers County is included in the Valley, AL Micropolitan Statistical Area and the Columbus-Auburn-Opelika, GA-AL Combined Statistical Area. [3]

History[edit]

Chambers County was established on December 18, 1832.

Pat Garrett, the lawman famed for killing outlaw Billy the Kid, was born near the town of Cusseta in 1850.

Joe Louis "The Brown Bomber", renowned heavyweight boxing champion, was born near LaFayette, on Buckaloo Mountain, May 13, 1914.

Chambers County joined the four mill cities to make The Valley (which is now the largest city). Valley is rapidly increasing in size and located between Montgomery, Alabama and Atlanta, Georgia.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 603 square miles (1,560 km2), of which 597 square miles (1,550 km2) is land and 6.6 square miles (17 km2) (1.1%) is water.[4]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 17,333
1850 23,960 38.2%
1860 23,214 −3.1%
1870 17,562 −24.3%
1880 23,440 33.5%
1890 26,319 12.3%
1900 32,554 23.7%
1910 36,056 10.8%
1920 41,201 14.3%
1930 39,313 −4.6%
1940 42,146 7.2%
1950 39,528 −6.2%
1960 37,828 −4.3%
1970 36,356 −3.9%
1980 39,191 7.8%
1990 36,876 −5.9%
2000 36,583 −0.8%
2010 34,215 −6.5%
Est. 2013 34,162 −0.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790-1960[6] 1900-1990[7]
1990-2000[8] 2010-2013[1]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 36,583 people, 14,522 households, and 10,194 families residing in the county. The population density was 61 people per square mile (24/km2). There were 16,256 housing units at an average density of 27 per square mile (11/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 60.88% White, 38.11% Black or African American, 0.13% Native American, 0.19% Asian, 0.12% from other races, and 0.57% from two or more races. 0.77% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 14,522 households out of which 29.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.50% were married couples living together, 17.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.80% were non-families. 27.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the county the population was spread out with 24.60% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 27.00% from 25 to 44, 23.50% from 45 to 64, and 16.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 89.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,667, and the median income for a family was $36,598. Males had a median income of $28,771 versus $21,159 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,147. About 14.30% of families and 17.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.50% of those under age 18 and 18.20% of those age 65 or over.

Popular Culture[edit]

Chambers County has been the back drop of several movies including Mississippi Burning.

The Crossing William Trilogy, A Horror/Fiction novel, is centered in this county on the edge of the Chattahoochee River. The work is filled with local color from this area with many landmarks noted in the pages. http://www.crossingwilliam.com

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Towns[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Census-designated places (CDPs)[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 
  2. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 74. 
  3. ^ OMB BULLETIN NO. 13-01: Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas. Office of Management and Budget. February 28, 2013.
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 15, 2014. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 32°54′40″N 85°23′38″W / 32.91111°N 85.39389°W / 32.91111; -85.39389