Vampeta

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Vampeta
Vampeta.jpg
Personal information
Full name Marcos André Batista dos Santos
Date of birth (1974-03-13) 13 March 1974 (age 40)
Place of birth Nazaré, Bahia, Brazil
Height 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Club information
Current team
Grêmio Osasco (Manager)
Youth career
1990–1993 Vitória
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1993–1994 Vitória 8 (0)
1994 PSV Eindhoven 3 (0)
1995 VVV-Venlo (loan) 7 (3)
1995–1996 Fluminense (loan) 23 (2)
1996–1998 PSV Eindhoven 31 (2)
1998–2000 Corinthians 53 (4)
2000 Internazionale 1 (0)
2001 PSG 7 (0)
2001 Flamengo 16 (1)
2002–2003 Corinthians 29 (0)
2004 Vitória 6 (0)
2004 Kuwait SC
2005 Brasiliense 37 (0)
2006 Goiás 1 (0)
2007 Corinthians
2008 CA Juventus
National team
1998–2002 Brazil 39 (2)
Teams managed
2010 Nacional (SP)
2011 Grêmio Osasco
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

"Vampeta", born Marcos André Batista dos Santos, (born 13 March 1974, in Nazaré) is a former Brazilian professional football player and current coach of Grêmio Osasco. He has played in midfield. He represented Brazil from 1998 until 2002, winning the 1999 Copa América and the 2002 FIFA World Cup.

Vampeta, his nickname, is a fusion of the words "vampiro" (Portuguese for vampire) and "capeta" (Portuguese slang for devil).[1]

Football career[edit]

Vampeta started his career in Salvador, with team Vitória, and later went to Europe with Dutch team PSV Eindhoven, who signed him alongside Ronaldo in the summer of 1994. After a difficult first season, PSV released him on loan to Fluminense, before he returned to the Netherlands as regular of the team that won the first Dutch title in 5 years in 1997.

His good performance in Eindhoven led him back to Brazil were at Corinthians he grew out to become a member of the Brazilian national team. Vampeta then joined Internazionale in summer 2000, being reunited with Ronaldo. After failing to hold down a first-team place however, he stated that he wanted to leave and went to Rio de Janeiro in December for a vacation. In January 2001, Vampeta went to PSG for €12.196 million[2] as part exchange for Stéphane Dalmat, which Inter retained 50% registration rights on Vampeta .[3]

He was involved in the Adriano (€13.189 million to Inter[2]) and Reinaldo (to PSG) transfer in August 2001, who both played in Flamengo, in exchange for Vampeta who was joint-owned by Inter and PSG.[4] Another half of Vampeta was sold for €9.757 million,[2]

In 2007, he returned to Corinthians, signed a contract until the end of season.

After being released by Corinthians, he signed a contract until mid-2008 with CA Juventus for 2008 Campeonato Paulista.

International career[edit]

He made his Brazil debut in a friendly match against FR Yugoslavia on 23 September 1998. He then became a regular player for Brazil, being called up for the Copa América 1999, 1999 FIFA Confederations Cup and 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup. He was also on Brazil's World Cup winning team in 2002, although he only made one substitute appearance during the competition.

Coaching career[edit]

In February 2010, the former Brazil national football team player was named as the new head coach of Nacional Atlético Clube (SP).[5]

Honors and awards[edit]

PSV Eindhoven
Corinthians
Goiás
Brazil

International goals[edit]

Scores and results list Brazil's goal tally first.
# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1 2000-07-26 São Paulo, Brazil  Argentina 2–0 3–1 2002 FIFA World Cup Qual.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mosqueteiro peladão" (in Portuguese). Época. 28 December 1998. Retrieved 21 February 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c FC Internazionale Milano SpA Report and Accounts on 30 June 2002 (Italian), CCIAA
  3. ^ "THE EXCHANGE VAMPETA-DALMAT HAS BEEN MADE OFFICIAL". Internazionale. 26 January 2001. Retrieved 29 July 2009. 
  4. ^ "ADRIANO TO INTER: COMPLEX DEALING BUT REACHABLE". Internazionale. 3 August 2001. Retrieved 29 July 2009. 
  5. ^ Indicado pelo Corinthians, Vampeta vira técnico no Nacional

External links[edit]