Van Riper-Hopper House

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Van Riper-Hopper House
VanRiper-Hopper House.jpg
Van Riper Hopper House, seen from the front in mid-December, 2011.
Van Riper-Hopper House is located in Passaic County, New Jersey
Van Riper-Hopper House
Nearest city 533 Berdan Avenue, Wayne, New Jersey
Coordinates 40°58′39.59″N 74°14′34.45″W / 40.9776639°N 74.2429028°W / 40.9776639; -74.2429028Coordinates: 40°58′39.59″N 74°14′34.45″W / 40.9776639°N 74.2429028°W / 40.9776639; -74.2429028
Area 2.7 acres (1.1 ha)
Architect Van Riper, Uriah R. & Berdan
Architectural style Dutch Colonial
Governing body Local
NRHP Reference # 72000806[1]
NJRHP # 2418[2]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP August 21, 1972
Designated NJRHP May 1, 1972

Van Riper-Hopper House, is located in Wayne, Passaic County, New Jersey, United States. The house was built in 1786 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places on August 21, 1972. The house is home to the Wayne Township Museum.[3] It is one of the oldest buildings in New Jersey.

History[edit]

The house was built in 1786 by Uriah Van Riper. The house remained in the Van Riper family and was bequeathed to Uriah Van Riper's great granddaughter, Mary Ann Van Riper, who married Andrew Hopper in 1872. On July 6, 1964, the house was officially dedicated as the Wayne Township Museum.[4] Prior to Uriah's building the house, the property was purchased by Richard (Dirck) Van Riper in 1762, and consisted of 145 acres.[5] The town of Wayne was known Saddle River at the time,[5] which is referenced in Richard Van Riper's will. The "barn house" in the back was removed from its original place near the Wayne Hills Mall, and transported to the Property of the Van Riper House Museum.[6] The name Van Riper-Hopper came from the surname given to Mary Ann and Andrew's children, Uriah and Mary (Mame) Van Riper-Hopper.[7]

Geography[edit]

When the Van Riper-Hopper house land was first purchased, Northern New Jersey was divided into East and West Jersey. Today's Wayne Township was known as Saddle River, and belonged to Bergen County.[8] Its location is now known as Passaic County.

Architecture[edit]

The house was built in the traditional Dutch Colonial style. The second hallway of the second floor was altered by a previous owner in the 1950s. Built in closets and dressers were added, which were not typical of the Dutch Colonial style. The building of the house was based on the wilderness of in the property and the materials available.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ "New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places - Passaic County". New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection - Historic Preservation Office. January 10, 2010. p. 19. Retrieved April 29, 2010. 
  3. ^ http://www.waynetownship.com/his-mus.htm Accessed April 30, 2010.
  4. ^ http://www.passaiccountynj.org/parkshistorical/historical_attractions/vanripperhopper.htm Accessed April 30, 2010.
  5. ^ a b Jackson, Charles, S. (1973). The Van Riper-Hopper House: Museum of Wayne, New Jersey. Wayne Township Historical Commission. p. 14. 
  6. ^ Carol D'Alessandro, (Museums Liaison),. "Interview, February 20, 2011.". 
  7. ^ Jackson, Charles, S. (1973). The Van Riper-Hopper House: Museum of Wayne, New Jersey. Wayne Township Historical Commission. p. 18. 
  8. ^ Jackson, Charles, S. (1973). The Van Riper-Hopper House: Museum of Wayne, New Jersey. Wayne Township Historical Commission. p. 13. 

External links[edit]