Vander Ende-Onderdonk House

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Vander Ende--Onderdonk House Site
Vander Ende Onderdonk back jeh.jpg
Vander Ende-Onderdonk House is located in New York City
Vander Ende-Onderdonk House
Location 1820 Flushing Avenue Ridgewood, Queens NY
Coordinates 40°42′40″N 73°55′12″W / 40.71111°N 73.92000°W / 40.71111; -73.92000Coordinates: 40°42′40″N 73°55′12″W / 40.71111°N 73.92000°W / 40.71111; -73.92000
Area 2 acres (0.81 ha)
Built 1661
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 77000975[1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHP January 31, 1977
Designated NYCL March 21, 1995

Vander Ende--Onderdonk House (Van Anda House; Van Enden House) is a historic house at 1820 Flushing Avenue in Ridgewood, Queens.[2] It is the oldest Dutch Colonial stone house in New York City.

The original house on the site was built in 1661 by Hendrick Barents Smidt, from land that was granted to him by Peter Stuyvesant.[2] Another part of the structure, expanding from the original house, was built in 1709 by Paulus Vander Ende.[3] The house was mentioned in a 1769 survey that established the boundary between Kings and Queens counties and may have been largely constructed around this time. The Onderdonk family acquired the property in 1821. In 1975 the house suffered a serious fire that destroyed many of its wooden elements. It was rebuilt in the early 1980s.[4]

The house was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.[2] It was designated a landmark by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1995.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ a b c "The Vander Ende-Onderdonk House". Greater Ridgewood Historical Society. Retrieved 15 October 2010. 
  3. ^ Sarah T. Bridges (August 1976). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: Vander Ende-Onderdonk House". New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2011-01-16. 
  4. ^ a b "Adrian and Ann Wyckoff Onderdonk House Designation Report" (PDF). New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 

External links[edit]