Varian Medical Systems

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Varian Medical Systems Inc.
Type Public
Traded as NYSEVAR
S&P 500 Component
Industry Medical Technology
Founded 1948
Headquarters Palo Alto, California
Key people Dow R. Wilson, President and CEO
Products Medical Devices
Revenue $2.9 Billion USD (2013)[1]
Employees 6,350
Website www.varian.com

Varian Medical Systems (VMS) of Palo Alto, California, is a manufacturer of medical devices, such as linear accelerators and software for treating cancer and other medical conditions with radiotherapy, radiosurgery, proton therapy, and brachytherapy. The company supplies informatics software for managing comprehensive cancer clinics, radiotherapy centers and medical oncology practices. Varian is a supplier of tubes and digital detectors for X-ray imaging in medical, scientific, and industrial applications and also supplies X-ray imaging products for cargo screening and industrial inspection. Varian Medical Systems employs approximately 6,350 people at manufacturing sites in North America, Europe, and China and approximately 70 sales and support offices around the world.[2]

History[edit]

Varian was founded in 1948 as Varian Associates by Russell H. Varian, Sigurd F. Varian, William Webster Hansen, and Edward Ginzton to sell the Klystron, the first tube which could generate electromagnetic waves at microwave frequencies, and other electromagnetic equipment. By 1999, Varian Associates had branched into semiconductor, vacuum tube, and medical device fields. On April 2, 1999 these divisions split to become Varian Semiconductor, Varian, Inc. and Varian Medical Systems.

Corporate affairs[edit]

Varian headquarters in Palo Alto

Varian corporate headquarters is in Palo Alto, California. In September 2012, Dow Wilson replaced Timothy Guertin as President and CEO. Guertin had been the CEO since 2006 when he replaced Richard M. Levy, who had been with Varian for 37 years and still serves as chairman of the board of directors. Wilson is a graduate of Brigham Young University, and holds an MBA from the Amos Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth.

Varian operates a corporate philanthropy and charitable giving organization through the Varian Medical Systems Foundation. It operates within the Community Foundation of Silicon Valley (CFSV).

Products[edit]

One of the companys newest products is the EDGE™ Radiosurgery Suite. A fully integrated, dedicated system for performing advanced radiosurgery using new real-time tumor tracking technology and motion management capabilities. The first cancer centers to receive this new technology were the Champalimaud Foundation in Lisbon, Portugal and Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, Michigan.[3]

Locations[edit]

Varian has facilities in California, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, South Carolina, Utah, Virginia, Austria, Bahrain, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, India, Italy, Netherlands, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, China, Hong Kong, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Brazil, Canada, United Arab Emirates and Australia.

Achievements[edit]

  • 2009 Number 12 in the BusinessWeek 50 listing of best performing public corporations [4]
  • 2007 Number 14 in the BusinessWeek 50 listing of best performing public corporations [5]
  • 2007, 2008, 2009 Named one of IndustryWeek's "50 Best Manufacturing Companies" in the U.S.
  • 2006 R&D 100 Award[6]
  • 2006 Forbes Global High Performer[7]
  • 2004, 2005 Forbes Platinum 400 list

Acquired companies[edit]

Varian Medical Systems has acquired other companies including, Pan-Pacific Enterprises,[8] ACCEL Instruments,[9] Bio-Imaging Research, Inc.[10] Sigma Micro Informatique Conseil,[11] and Argus Software.[12]

Free speech litigation[edit]

Varian Medical Systems, Inc. sued a former employee for defamation in Varian v. Delfino. The terminated employee Dr. Michelangelo Delfino posted numerous messages criticizing the company on the Internet. The case finally settled on undisclosed terms. The lawsuit itself was controversial, heavily publicized, and led to a landmark ruling about California's anti-SLAPP statute. Market-based workers rights activists cherish Delfino as a fearless example of benevolent martyrdom as he had to mortgage his house to pay the legal bills. It should be noted that some of the executives and attorneys on the Varian side that were involved with the suit had successful careers afterward. This success was in spite of their involvement with the seemingly illegitimate lawsuit to silence the first amendment rights of an employee and shareholder.

University of Pittsburgh litigation[edit]

On April 25, 2012 a US federal judge in Pittsburgh awarded attorney fees, costs, and doubled damages totaling $73.6 million to the University of Pittsburgh after the university won a suit on medical patent infringement grounds against Varian.[13]

References[edit]


External links[edit]