List of Marvel Comics characters: V

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Vagabond (Scourge of the Underworld V)[edit]

Priscilla Lyons (Vagabond) is a superhero in the Marvel Universe. Created by Mark Gruenwald and Paul Neary, the character first appeared in Captain America #325 in January 1987. Within the context of the stories, Priscilla is an ally of Jack Monroe.

Vague[edit]

Vague is a mutant in the Marvel Universe. Created by Peter David and Larry Stroman, the character first appeared in X-Factor #80. Within the context of the stories, Vague could become transparent or invisible. She lost her abilities due to events of M-Day.

Vakume[edit]

Vakume is a magical supervillain in the Marvel Universe. Created by Len Wein and George Pérez, the character first appeared in Fantastic Four #186 in September 1977. Within the context of the stories, he is a member of Salem's Seven and is able to control air.

Valinor[edit]

Valinor is the Black Knight's steed in the Marvel Universe. Created by Steven Parkhouse and John Stokes, the character first appeared in Hulk Comic #1 in March 1979. Within the context of the stories, Valinor is a magically enhanced horse from the extra-dimensional realm of Avalon. He serves as a steed of the Black Knight after he had given his previous steed Aragorn to the Valkyrie,[1] and the Blood Wraith in battle against the Black Knight and the Avengers.[2]

Valkin[edit]

Valkin is an Eternal in the Marvel Universe. Created by Jack Kirby, the character first appeared in The Eternals #11 in May 1977. Valkin Valkin is the former leader of the Polar Eternals and the uncle and adoptive father of Ikaris. Around 3000BC he led the Eternal settlement in the Southern Andean mountains to teach and cultivate the ancestors of the Aztecs and Incas. In modern times, he went to Olympia to participate in the formation of a Uni-Mind.[3] With the other Eternals, he prepared for the coming of the Third Celestial Host of Celestials in South America; his brother Virako died battling the World-Worm, and Valkin adopted Virako's son Ikaris.[4] In modern times, he became the leader of a group of Eternals that left Earth in the form of the Uni-Mind.[5]

Valtorr[edit]

Valtorr is a demon in the Marvel Universe. The character first appeared in X-Men #12 in 1965.

Vamp[edit]

Vamp is a Corporation agent in the Marvel Universe. The character, created by Roy Thomas, Don Glut, and John Buscema, first appeared in Captain America #217 in January 1978. Within the context of the stories, Vamp has an evil alter-ego called Animus and infiltrates S.H.I.E.L.D.[6] She is killed by the Scourge of the Underworld,[7] but later appears in a prison break.[8]

Vampiro[edit]

Vampiro is the name of two characters in the Marvel Universe. The first character, created by Roy Thomas and Arvell Jones, first appeared in The Mighty Thor #290 in December 1979. Within the context of the stories, Vampiro is an Eternal who is a professional wrestler.

The second character, created by Erik Larsen, Coy Turnbull and Al Milgrom, first appeared in Nova vol. 3 #5 in September 1999. Within the context of the stories, Vampiro is a villain who fights Nova and Spider-Man.[9] He is later killed by The Hood.[10]

Rachel Van Helsing[edit]

Rachel van Helsing is a vampire hunter in the Marvel Universe. The character, created by Archie Goodwin and Gene Colan, first appeared in Tomb of Dracula #3 in July 1972. Within the context of the stories, she is the great-granddaughter of Abraham Van Helsing. She is killed by Dracula and turned into a vampire. She asks Wolverine to kill her, and he does.[11] Frank Drake avenged her death.[12]

Rachel van Helsing in other media[edit]

  • In the English dub of the Toei animated Tomb of Dracula TV movie (Dracula: Sovereign of the Damned), Rachel Van Helsing was voiced by actress Melanie McQueen.

Vanguard[edit]

Vanguard (Nikolai Krylenko) is a mutant in the Marvel Universe. The character, created by Bill Mantlo and Carmine Infantino, first appeared in Iron Man #109 in April 1978. Within the context of the stories, Vanguard is Russian and the son of Sergei Krylov. He is trained as a soldier and comes into conflict with Iron Man, Jack of Hearts, and other Avengers. After dying and being resurrected by his father, Vanguard becomes the new Red Guardian and leads the Winter Guard.[13]

Vargas[edit]

Vargas is a mutant supervillain in the Marvel Universe. The character, created by Chris Claremont and Salvador Larroca, first appeared in X-Treme X-Men #1 in 2001. Within the context of the stories, Vargas comes into conflict with the X-Men while searching for the diaries of Destiny.[14] He claims to be "homo superior superior", humanity's "natural response" to the emergence of mutants, and possesses super-strength and speed in addition to highly advanced combat skills. He is killed by Rogue.[15]

Varnae[edit]

Varnae is a vampire in the Marvel Universe. The character, created by Steve Perry and Steve Bissette, first appeared in Bizarre Adventures #33 in December 1982. Within the context of the stories, Varnae is the first vampire and is the one who created Dracula. At various times in his life, he is an enemy of King Kull, Frank Drake, and John Blaze. He eventually tired of his eternal life and committed suicide by walking into sunlight and disintegrating, but he was resurrected years later by the voodoo priestess, Marie LaVeau but was confronted by Doctor Strange. The Sorcerer Supreme and the Lord of the Vampires battled, Varnae changing shape and revealing he had formerly sought to be Sorcerer Supreme before he became a vampire. Strange cast an "incantation of oblivion" on Varnae, making the undead mage relive his oblivion of five centuries. Embracing his existence as a vampire again, Varnae fled, claiming with Strange he finally had a reason to live again: A worthy foe.

Vavavoom[edit]

Vavavoom (Dawn Middlebury) is a superhuman in the Marvel Universe. Created by Michael Carlin and Ron Wilson, the character first appeared in The Thing #33 in March 1986. Within the context of the stories, Vavavoom received her powers from the Power Broker. She is a member of the Unlimited Class Wrestling Federation.

Vector[edit]

The first Vector (Simon Utrecht) is a member of the U-Foes in the Marvel Universe. Created by Bill Mantlo and Sal Buscema, the character first appeared in Incredible Hulk #254 in December 1980. Within the context of the stories, Vector and the U-Foes gain superpowers by duplicating the origin of the Fantastic Four, and appear as enemies of the Hulk.

Vector II[edit]

The second Vector appears in the pages of Avengers World. He is a member of the Ascendants who work for S.P.E.A.R.[16]

Vegas[edit]

Vegas is a superhero in the Marvel Universe. The character, created by Karl Kesel and Carmine Di Giandomenico, first appeared in Amazing Fantasy vol. 2 #13 (2003). Within the context of the story, Vegas is an anomalito, a person with superhuman abilities, described in Amazing Fantasy as "super-types without super-tights." Vegas temporarily joins the evil Renegades to be with his romantic interest Rose Red, but later opposes them. Vegas later accepts a position as a bounty-hunter, under the patronage of Texas Ranger Sgt. Harlan Stone.

Veil[edit]

Veil is a codename used by three people in the Marvel Universe. The first character, created by Fabian Nicieza and Kirk Jarvinen, appeared as part of the Desert Sword team in New Mutants Annual #7 in 1991. The second, created by Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray, appeared in Heroes for Hire vol 2 in 2006 as an anti-regulaton protestor during the Superhuman Civil War. The third, Madeline Berry, was created by Christos Gage and Mike McKone. She appeared in Avengers Academy #1 in 2010. Her powers were killing her until she was able to find a cure that saved her life but rendered her powerless. At the series' conclusion, Veil was sent back home to high school to live as a normal student, avoiding the events of Avengers Arena.

Velocidad[edit]

Velocidad (Gabriel Cohuelo) is a mutant in the Marvel Universe. The first character, created by Matt Fraction and Kieron Gillen, first appeared in Uncanny X-Men #527 in 2010.

Within the context of the stories, Gabriel is a 16-year-old mutant from Mexico City. He is unable to control his mutant powers until assisted by Hope Summers.[17] Gabriel follows Hope on her mission to find other young mutants, and they ally with Oya and Primal. He and his friends relocate to Utopia,[18] where they are trained by more experienced X-Men.[19] Gabriel and Hope begin a romantic relationship,[20] but it ends when Hope discovers him kissing Pixie. Because Velocidad's powers work by accelerating him through time, the use of his powers causes rapid aging.[21] A four-hour mission can last several days from his perspective,[21] and he is capable of burning through several days of his life in a matter of minutes.[22]

Other versions of Velocidad[edit]

  • Gabriel appears briefly in the Age of X storyline. Like his main-universe counterpart, this version of Gabriel has a marked enthusiasm for the codename "Velocidad".[23]

Venus Dee Milo[edit]

Venus Dee Milo is a mutant in the Marvel Universe. Created by Peter Milligan and Mike Allred, the character first appeared in X-Statix #1 in 2002. Within the context of the stories, Venus Dee Milo is a member of the mutant group X-Statix.

Veritas[edit]

Veritas is a being in the Marvel Universe. The character, created by Stan Lee and Marie Severin, first appeared in Strange Tales #154 in March 1967.

Within the context of the stories, Veritas is a mysterious being who embodies truth, and has precognitive powers. Veritas helped Doctor Strange defeat Umar,[24] and assisted Nova and the New Warriors against the Sphinx while using the name "Sayge".[25][26][27]

Count Otto Vermis[edit]

Count Otto Vermis was the leader of HYDRA's European branch. His only appearance (in main Marvel continuity) was in Marvel Spotlight #32 (February 1977), the book that featured the first appearance of Spider-Woman.

Vermis recruited Jessica Drew (whom by that time went by the name "Arachne") into HYDRA at a time when she was suffering from amnesia and had no clue about her own past. He then manipulated her into falling in love with fellow agent Jared and attempting to kill Nick Fury.

Vermis promised to find out the truth about Arachne's past and did a sincere effort in that direction, although the findings were incomplete and misleading. Ultimately, he kept what little he knew hidden from Arachne until soon before his death.[28]

An alternate timeline's Vermis was also seen in a What If...?,[29] where he was alive, but captured by S.H.I.E.L.D. agents and where Spider-Woman is a super-villain.[30]

Vesper[edit]

Vesper (Raani Jatwinder) is a fictional mutant in the Marvel Comics Universe. Her first appearance was in Genetix #1.

Vesper is an Indian woman, who joined Genetix at the age of 20. She is cool, calm, and reflective, and serves as the mediator and leader of the team.

A cell sample taken from Vesper by Death Metal was combined with the genetic material of Madison Jeffries, and artificially implanted into Krista Marwan. This was done in the hopes that she would conceive a child that could destroy him.[volume & issue needed]

Vesper possesses telepathic and technopathic abilities that allow her to communicate with and control machines and computers. Vesper can convert her mind into a form able to enter "Cyberspace," leaving her body at great risk to outside attack.

Vesta[edit]

Vesta or Hestia is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. She first appeared in Thor #301 (November 1980), and was adapted from mythology by Mark Gruenwald, Ralph Macchio, and Keith Pollard.

Vesta is the goddess of the hearth in the Olympian pantheon.

Zeus, Neptune, and Pluto are her brothers, and Hera and Demeter are her sisters.

Vesta was present when Thor came to Olympus to ask for help from Zeus in reviving Asgardians who were slain in battle with the Celestials.[volume & issue needed]

Vesta was present at the funeral of Hercules when Athena laid claim to the throne of Olympus, and did not oppose Athena even though she was the sister of Zeus, because she did not want to rule.[volume & issue needed]

Vesta appeared as part of the "Olympian Gods" entry in the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe Deluxe Edition #9.

Vibranium[edit]

Vibranium (Baru) is a superhero in the Marvel Universe. The character, created by Pat Graphy, Mike Gustovich and Tom Palmer, first appeared in Deathlok vol. 2 #23 in May 1993. Within the context of the stories, Baru is the former king of Canaan,[31] and is turned into living vibranium by Diablo.[32]

Vienna[edit]

Vienna is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics' Marvel Universe. She was created by Steven Grant & David Mazzucchelli, and first appeared in Master of Kung Fu #21 (February 1983).

Vienna first appeared as a stewardess on a plane where Shang-Chi was being threatened by a man named Kiley and Vienna helped him to defend himself. She became attracted to him and wanted to become a partner-in-crimefighting, but Shang-Chi refused to put her life in danger.[volume & issue needed]

Some time afterward, she posed as a nun to help both Power Man and Iron Man to take down a villain named Stoneface. Her last known appearance was as Angela Tortelli, where she acted as the wife of the mobster Joey Tortelli. It was here that she met Colleen Wing and Misty Knight and manipulated them into bringing down a rival mobster. They later worked together against a villain named Impasse, for which she was paid $20,000.[volume & issue needed]

Vienna appears in Heroes for Hire vol. 2 #1 helping the Heroes for Hire to capture Grindhouse and other unregistered villains by offering fake identification. The plot also tests the trustworthiness of the new Heroes for Hire Humbug and Tarantula (Maria Vasquez).[volume & issue needed]

Vindaloo[edit]

Vindaloo is a mutant in the Marvel Universe. The character, created by Alan Davis and Fabian Nicieza, first appeared in Uncanny X-Men #366. Within the context of the stories, Vindaloo is a member of the Acolytes.

Visimajoris[edit]

Visimajoris is a demon in the Marvel Universe. The character, created by Jim Starlin and Al Milgrom, first appeared in Doctor Strange #24 in August 1977. Within the context of the stories, Visimajoris serves the Creators and is an enemy of Doctor Strange.

Volla[edit]

Volla is a fictional character appearing in Marvel Comics. She is based on Fulla from Norse mythology. Volla first appeared in Thor #127 (April 1966), and was adapted from mythology by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby.

The character subsequently appeared in Thor #1-3 (July–September 1998), #29 (November 2000), #32 (January 2001), #35 (May 2001), and #43 (January 2002). According to Thor #295, Erda is Volla's sister.[33]

Volla dies after making known her prophecies of Ragnarok. Those with the courage and bravery to journey into the Realm of the Dead may still obtain her predictions. There she exists as a simple wraith. In Thor #276 Loki reveals Hela summoned up her spirit so she and Loki could hear how to cause Ragnarok.[34]

Volla has precognitive powers, which allow her to see alternate futures.

Volla appeared as part of the "Asgardians" entry in the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe Deluxe Edition #1.

Volla in other media[edit]

  • Volla appears as a non-playable character in Marvel: Ultimate Alliance, voiced by Nika Futterman. One of the optional missions in Niffleheim involves finding a trunk that contains her ring. This has been stolen by Kurse and Ulik. If the player recovers Volla's ring, she will warn Odin about an attempt on his life which will lead to the capture of Surtur in the years to come. If not, the death of Odin will plunge Asgard into years of chaos during which Thor will rule Asgard after Sif dies in battle. She has special dialogue with Ms. Marvel when the player first meets her, and with Blade after the player finds her ring. After the player beats Baron Mordo and Ultron, there are four replicas placed alongside Odin's spear. When the player has found Volla's ring, the real spear that would lead them to where Doctor Doom has taken Loki glows.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Avengers #226
  2. ^ Avengers Annual #22
  3. ^ Eternals #11
  4. ^ as told in Thor Annual #7
  5. ^ Avengers #248
  6. ^ Captain America #222-223
  7. ^ Mark Gruenwald (w), Paul Neary (p), Dennis Janke (i). "Overkill" Captain America 319 (July 1986), Marvel Comics
  8. ^ Deadpool #0
  9. ^ Nova vol 3 #5 (September 1999)
  10. ^ Avengers: The Initiative #31 (April 2010)
  11. ^ Uncanny X-Men Annual #6
  12. ^ Doctor Strange vol. 2 #61-62
  13. ^ Darkstar and the Winter Guard #2-3
  14. ^ X-Treme X-Men #1
  15. ^ X-Treme X-Men #17
  16. ^ Avengers World #7
  17. ^ Uncanny X-Men #527 (2010)
  18. ^ Generation Hope #4 (2011)
  19. ^ Generation Hope #5 (2011)
  20. ^ Generation Hope #10
  21. ^ a b Generation Hope #15
  22. ^ Generation Hope #16
  23. ^ Age of X: Universe #2 (2011)
  24. ^ Strange Tales #154 (March 1967)
  25. ^ Nova #10
  26. ^ New Warriors #13
  27. ^ New Warriors #50
  28. ^ Marvel Spotlight #32, February 1977
  29. ^ What If? vol. 1 #17 (October 1979)
  30. ^ Article on Earth-79101 at the Appendix to the Handbook of the Marvel Universe
  31. ^ Deathlok vol. 2 #23 (May 1993)
  32. ^ Avengers Collector's Edition #1 (1993)
  33. ^ Thor #295
  34. ^ Thor #276