Vauquelin-class destroyer

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Kersaint
Kersaint
Class overview
Name: Vauquelin class destroyer
Preceded by: Aigle class
Succeeded by: Fantasque class
Completed: 6
General characteristics
Type: Destroyer
Displacement: 2,441 long tons (2,480 t)
Length: 129 m (423 ft 3 in)
Beam: 11.84 m (38 ft 10 in)
Draught: 4.97 m (16 ft 4 in) max
Propulsion: Geared turbines, 4 boilers, 64,000 shp (47,725 kW)
Speed: 36 knots (67 km/h; 41 mph)
Range: 3,650 nmi (6,760 km; 4,200 mi) at 18 kn (33 km/h; 21 mph)
Complement: 220 officers and men
Armament:
  • 5 × 138 mm (5.4 in) Model 1927 guns
  • 4 × 27 mm (1.1 in) AA guns
  • 4 × 13 mm (0.51 in) AA guns
  • 7 × 550 mm (22 in) torpedo tubes (1x3, 2x2)

The Vauquelin-class large destroyers (contre-torpilleurs) of the French navy were laid down in 1930 and commissioned in 1931. They were very similar to the previous Aigle class, the only difference being a single extra torpedo tube. The class saw action in World War II.

Ships[edit]

(Pennant numbers: 2, 3, 93 and X92)
Named after the 18th century naval captain Jacques Cassard
Built by Ateliers et Chantiers de Bretagne, Nantes
Completed 10 September 1933
Scuttled 27 November 1942
Broken up in situ 1956
  • Chevalier Paul
(Pennant numbers: 3, 2, 53, X52)
Named after 17th century admiral Chevalier Paul
Built by Forges et Chantiers de la Méditerranée, Le Havre
Completed 20 July 1934
Torpedoed and sunk off Syrian coast 16 June 1941
  • Kersaint
(Pennant numbers: 9, 92, X93)
Named after Admiral Armand de Kersaint
Built by Ateliers et Chantiers de la Loire, St Nazaire
Completed 31 December 1933
Scuttled 27 November 1942
Broken up in situ 1950
(Pennant numbers: 7, 91, X91)
Named after French admiral Jean Armand de Maillé-Brézé,
Built by Ateliers et Chantiers de St Nazaire-Penhoet, St Nazaire
Completed 6 April 1933
Lost by accidental explosion 30 April 1940, Greenock, Scotland
Refloated and scrapped
  • Tartu
(Pennant numbers: 1, 51, X51)
Named in honour of Jean-François Tartu
Built by Ateliers et Chantiers de la Loire, St Nazaire
Completed 31 December 1932
Scuttled 27 November 1942
Broken up in situ 1956
  • Vauquelin
(Pennant numbers: 8, 52, X53)
Named after Moise Vauquelin
Built by Ateliers et Chantiers de France, Dunkirk
Completed 3 November 1933
Scuttled 27 November 1942
Broken up in situ 1951

Maillé Brézé was lost on 30 April 1940 after a torpedo accident at Greenock, Scotland, killing 25 of her crew (sabotage was suspected at the time). Chevalier Paul was sunk off the coast of Syria on 16 June 1941, by British torpedo bombers. Vauquelin, Cassard, Kersaint and Tartu were all scuttled in Toulon Harbour on 27 November 1942 to prevent their capture by Germany, these ships were too badly damaged to be salvaged.

References[edit]