Vectorcardiography

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Vectorcardiography
Intervention
Vektorkardiogramm kgm-normal.jpg
Normal vectorcardiogram
ICD-9-CM 89.53
MeSH D014672

Vectorcardiography (sometimes abbreviated as VCG) is a method of recording the magnitude and direction of the electrical forces that are generated by the heart by means of a continuous series of vectors that form curving lines around a central point.[1]

Vectorcardiography was developed by E. Frank in the early 1930s.[citation needed] Since the human body is a three-dimensional structure, the basic idea is to construct three orthogonal leads containing all the electric information. The three leads are represented by right-left axis (X), head-to-feet axis (Y) and front-back (anteroposterior) axis (Z).

To calculate Frank’s leads X, Y and Z using the standard leads system, the following expressions[2] are used:

X = -(-0.172 V1 - 0.074 V2 + 0.122 V3 + 0.231 V4 + 0.239 V5 + 0.194 V6 + 0.156 DI - 0.010 DII) (1)

Y = (0.057 V1 - 0.019 V2 - 0.106 V3 - 0.022 V4 + 0.041 V5 + 0.048 V6 - 0.227 DI + 0.887 DII) (2)

Z = -(-0.229 V1 - 0.310 V2 - 0.246 V3 - 0.063 V4 + 0.055 V5 + 0.108 V6 + 0.022 DI + 0.102 DII) (3)

There are different criteria how at to evaluate a vectorcardiogram created by various researchers. Grygoriy Risman presents these different methods, which were developed over half a century and offers an advanced approach called Spatial Vectorcardiometry (SVCM).[3] The original Russian thesis is filed in the Odessa Medical Academy.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Merriam Webster Online. http://dev.m-w.com/medical/vectorcardiographic.
  2. ^ G Daniel, G Lissa, D Medina Redondo et al. (2007). "Real-time 3D vectorcardiography: An application for didactic use". Journal of Physics: Conference Series 90 90. 
  3. ^ Spatial Vectorcardiometry (Russian/English/German). http://www.vectorcardiometry.tk
  4. ^ Odessa Medical Academy. http://info.odmu.edu.ua/lib/catalog/47402

See also[edit]