Veep (TV series)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Veep
Veep intertitle.png
Genre Comedy
Political satire
Created by Armando Iannucci
Starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus
Anna Chlumsky
Tony Hale
Matt Walsh
Timothy Simons
Reid Scott
Sufe Bradshaw
Gary Cole
Kevin Dunn
Sam Richardson
Composer(s) Rupert Gregson-Williams
Christopher Willis
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 3
No. of episodes 28 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s) Armando Iannucci
Christopher Godsick
Frank Rich
Simon Blackwell
Camera setup Single camera
Running time 26–30 minutes
Broadcast
Original channel HBO
Picture format 1080i (HDTV)
Original run April 22, 2012 (2012-04-22)  – present
Chronology
Related shows The Thick of It
In the Loop
External links
Website

Veep is an HBO television comedy series, starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus, set in the office of Selina Meyer, a fictional Vice President, and subsequent President, of the United States. The series is a spin off set in the same universe as The Thick of It also created by Armando Iannucci. He also created the Academy Award-nominated film In the Loop (2009), which starred several Veep cast members alongside several Thick of It cast members.

Veep premiered on HBO on April 22, 2012,[1] with an eight-episode season. This was followed by a second season of ten episodes debuting on April 14, 2013.[2][3] On May 1, 2013, HBO renewed Veep for a ten-episode third season that began on April 6, 2014.[4][5] On April 21, 2014, HBO ordered a fourth season of Veep.[6]

Veep has received critical acclaim and won several major awards. It has been nominated three years in a row for the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series; its second season won the Writers Guild of America Award for Television: Comedy Series, and its third season won the TCA Award for Outstanding Achievement in Comedy. It joins The Office, 30 Rock, and Modern Family as the only comedy series since 2000 to win awards from both the Screen Actors Guild and Writers Guild of America in the same year. Louis-Dreyfus has won three consecutive Primetime Emmy Awards, one Screen Actors Guild Award, two Critics' Choice Television Awards and one Television Critics Association Award for her performance.

Cast and characters[edit]

Main[edit]

  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Vice President Selina Meyer: a former Maryland Senator and one-time presidential candidate. She often feels powerless, disregarded and discontented in her position as second in command. During her tenure as Vice President, her relation with the President was portrayed as a strained one. She is divorced with one daughter, however remains romantically entangled with her ex-husband.[7] Louis-Dreyfus has received widespread critical acclaim for her performance, winning three Primetime Emmy Awards, a Screen Actors Guild Award, and receiving two consecutive Golden Globe nominations.
  • Anna Chlumsky as Amy Brookheimer: the vice president's chief of staff. She credits herself as the Vice-President's "trouble-shooter, problem-solver, issue-mediator, doubt-remover, conscience-examiner, thought-thinker and all-round everything-doer". Amy is constantly sacrificing her own reputation to save Selina's political credibility. She is known to be uptight and overly dedicated to her career, unwilling to settle down and have children, much to the dismay of her family. She has had history with both Jonah and Dan, the latter she may still have feelings for.[8] Chlumsky had previously portrayed a similar character, Liza Weld, in Iannucci's 2009 film, In the Loop. She has received two consecutive Primetime Emmy Award nominations for her performance.
  • Tony Hale as Gary Walsh: the vice president's personal aide. A long-term associate and confidante of Selina's, Gary is portrayed as an incredibly loyal and giving aide to the Vice-President.[9] He received a Primetime Emmy Award for his performance on the series.
  • Matt Walsh as Mike McLintock: the vice president's director of communications. Also a long-time employee of Selina's, Mike has served as her communications director since her time as Senator for Maryland. His dedication to his career is often questionable, to the extent where he pretends to have a pet dog so he can escape from work commitments at times. He later marries a reporter named Wendy.[10]
  • Reid Scott as Dan Egan: deputy director of communications. The most recent addition to Selina's administration, Dan is a highly ambitious up-and-comer in DC who takes pride in his contacts and networking skills. He often dates the daughters of influential politicians to get ahead in his career. He often butts heads with Amy, whom he previously dated. It is suggested he may still have feelings for her.[11]
  • Sufe Bradshaw as Sue Wilson: the vice president's personal assistant. A direct and straightforward personality in the Veep's office, Sue boasts she is the third most important person in the world, as she is the one who arranges for people to see Selina, the second most important person in the world.[12]
  • Timothy Simons as Jonah Ryan, White House liaison to the vice president's office. Self-described as "the go-to guy for all things White House", Jonah takes immense pride that he works for the President and not for the Vice-President, much to the annoyance of the Veep's staff. In the third season, he is temporarily fired from the White House for running a blog covering inside information, leading him to create his own news website, Ryantology. He constantly clashes with most members of the Veep's office, particularly Amy, a former love interest.[13] It is shown that he is also disliked by the President's staff, and indeed, just about any politician he encounters (the Prime Minister of Finland compares him unfavorably to Krampus).
  • Kevin Dunn as Ben Cafferty: the President's White House Chief of Staff. Although he is depressed and hapless, he is often very insightful and is treated with respect and even fear throughout Washington. Ben shows little regard for his co-workers or his job, and appears to love his nine-cup coffee thermos more than anything else. Selina refers to him as a "burned-out loser", but he apparently considers her a close friend and resolves to help her become President. (season 3–present, recurring season 2)
  • Sam Richardson as Richard: an incompetent campaign aide who fills in for Gary during Selina's book tour. (season 4, recurring season 3)[14]

Recurring[edit]

  • Dan Bakkedahl as Roger Furlong: an ambitious Ohio congressman and ranking member of a congressional oversight committee. Ill-mannered and foul-mouthed, he constantly hounds the vice president's office and threatens investigations, even after he loses his campaign to be Governor of Ohio. In season three, however, Furlong supports Selina's presidential campaign by helping her prepare for a primary debate and doing post-debate "spin" on her behalf. (season 1–present)
  • Randall Park as Minnesota Governor Danny Chung: a young veteran who is not shy about exploiting his military record for political gain. A member of the president's party, he covets the presidency himself and is seen as Selina's chief rival for the nomination after the president leaves office. He frequently sought out Dan as an employee. (season 1–present)
  • Phil Reeves as Andrew Doyle: a senator from the president's party and the chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee. (season 1–present)
  • Sarah Sutherland as Catherine Meyer: Selina's reserved, put-upon daughter. Catherine is often caught in the middle of Selina's issues, especially with her father. She tends to have highly liberal views concerning social rights. (season 1–present)
  • Brian Huskey as Leon West: a veteran political reporter who frequently antagonizes Mike at briefings. (season 1–present)
  • William L. Thomas as Martin Collins: a Secret Service agent once reassigned for laughing in Selina's presence. (season 1–present)
  • Andy Buckley as Ted Cullen: Selina's former lover. (season 1)
  • Kate Burton as Barbara Hallowes: a senator and Dan's former boss. (season 1)
  • Peter Grosz as Sidney Purcell: an oil lobbyist. (season 1–2)
  • Nelson Franklin as Will: Congressman Furlong's aide. He is often subjected to vulgar verbal abuse from Furlong. (season 1–2)
  • Gary Cole as Kent Davison: the senior strategist to the President. He is a number-cruncher, and is often referred to as being cold and robotic. His adherence to polling statistics is shown to negatively influence the president's decision-making during several episodes in the second season. He attempts to come between Selina and the President, and forced Selina to appear friendly with her hated ex-husband during the election. He has a romantic interest in Sue, which she does not return. [15] (season 2–present)
  • Isiah Whitlock, Jr. as General George Maddox: the former Secretary of Defense and one of Selina's rivals for the presidential nomination. He appears to bear an unusually high degree of personal animosity towards Selina. (season 2–present)
  • Jessica St. Clair as Dana: Gary's over-possessive girlfriend. (season 2–present)
  • David Pasquesi as Andrew Meyer: Selina's ex-husband and occasional lover. He is disliked by Selina's staff, primarily for being one of her weaknesses. (season 2–present)
  • Sally Phillips as Minna Häkkinen: The former Prime Minister of Finland. (season 2–present)
  • Zach Woods as Ed Webster: Amy's boyfriend who is often neglected in favor of her job. Woods also appeared in "In the Loop" as a State Department aide who was a rival to Chlumsky's character. (season 2–present)
  • David Rasche as Jim Marwood: Speaker of the House of Representatives. (season 2)
  • Walid Amini as Rahim: Catherine's Persian-American ex-boyfriend. (season 2)
  • Kathy Najimy as Wendy Keegan: a reporter and Mike's wife. (season 3)
  • Christopher Meloni as Ray Whelans: Selina's personal trainer. (season 3)
  • Glenn Wrage as Joe Thornhill: a former Major League Baseball coach and one of Selina's rivals for the presidential nomination. He constantly uses sports analogies to describe politics, something which greatly annoys Selina and her staff. (season 3)
  • Diedrich Bader as Bill Ericsson: a well-respected campaign manager currently working for the Thornhill campaign. (season 3)

Episodes[edit]

Main article: List of Veep episodes

Development[edit]

Louis-Dreyfus with Vice President Joe Biden at the White House.

The Thick of It[edit]

BBC series[edit]

Veep uses the same cinéma-vérité filming style as Iannucci's BBC television sitcom The Thick of It, which is set in a fictional department of the British government. The Thick of It was first broadcast in 2005, gaining a number of awards and in 2009 inspired a spin-off film, In the Loop, which was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.

ABC pilot[edit]

A pilot for an American version of The Thick of It was produced as a candidate for the 2007–2008 season on ABC. The ABC pilot, also titled The Thick of It, was developed for American audiences by producers Mitch Hurwitz and Richard Day of Arrested Development fame and would have been about the day-to-day lives of a low-level member of the United States Congress and his staff. Original series creator Armando Iannucci had a production credit on the show, but he was not otherwise involved. The pilot was produced by Sony Pictures TV and BBC Worldwide. Grammy and Emmy Award-winner Christopher Guest directed the pilot.[16]

In the pilot, John Michael Higgins played Albert Alger, a newly elected Congressman and Oliver Platt played committee chairman Malcolm Tucker.[17] Actress Rhea Seehorn was Ollie Tadzio, a young and ambitious speech writer, and Michael McKean played Glen Glahm, "a former campaign operative who's now the chief of staff" for the congressman.[18]

ABC did not pick up the show for its fall 2007 schedule.[19] Iannucci distanced himself from the pilot stating, "It was terrible...they took the idea and chucked out all the style. It was all conventionally shot and there was no improvisation or swearing. It didn't get picked up, thank God."[20]

HBO development of Veep[edit]

After The Thick of It was dropped by ABC, several networks including HBO, Showtime and NBC again expressed interest in adapting the show.[21] Iannucci re-entered talks with HBO (his initial preference) about adapting the series, with the result that a new pilot episode for a series based in the office of the Vice President of the United States called Veep (a nickname derived from the position's initials "VP") was commissioned in late 2009.[20][22]

Iannucci has been given much more creative control over the show and co-wrote the pilot with English comedy writer Simon Blackwell, who also contributes to the British The Thick of It.[23][24] HBO announced that it had picked up the show for a full season in April 2011.[24]

Louis-Dreyfus has described Veep's intent not to have the President on-screen, or to reveal the political party of the characters.[25][26]

Production[edit]

In October 2011, AFRO reported more details of the show: "Directors for season one include Iannucci, Tristram Shapeero and Chris Morris. Veep is executive produced by Iannucci, Christopher Godsick and Frank Rich. Joining as co-executive producers are Simon Blackwell, Tony Roche, with Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Stephanie Laing producing. In addition to Iannucci, Blackwell and Roche, writers include Sean Gray, Will Smith, Roger Drew, Ian Martin and Jesse Armstrong."[27] Each of these writers has previously worked with Iannucci on the scripts of The Thick of It.

The series is recorded in Baltimore and began production in late 2011[23][28] after several months of rehearsal designed to get the actors comfortable improvising with one another.[29] Shooting for the pilot episode was completed in March 2011.

The series premiered on April 22, 2012 on HBO[1] and in the UK on Sky Atlantic on June 25, 2012.

Tax credits[edit]

Because most of Veep is filmed in Maryland, the show is eligible for a Maryland state tax credit.[30]

  • For season 1, the company received a tax credit of $3.4 million because the company hired nearly 1,000 Marylanders and had estimated economic impact of $30.6 million.[30]
  • For season 2, the company could receive a $5.5 million tax credit because the company hired of more than 1,000 people and had an estimated $44 million economic impact.[30]
  • For season 3, the company could receive up to a $6.5 million tax credit because the company hired more than 2,000 people and had an estimated $52 million economic impact.[30]
  • For season 4, the company filed an application and letter of intent to film in Maryland.[30] The company was "promised $7.4 million in tax credits, slightly less than what state economic development officials hoped to give".[30]

Reception[edit]

Season 1[edit]

The first season received generally positive reviews from television critics. Review aggregator site Metacritic gave the season a score of 72 out of 100 based on reviews from 30 critics.[31] The review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes reported a 71% approval rating with an average rating of 6.1/10 based on 22 reviews.[32] Hank Stuever of The Washington Post praised the series, writing: "Thanks to Louis-Dreyfus, and the show's remarkable knack for dialogue and timing, Veep is instantly engaging and outrageously fun."[33] Bob Brunner of Entertainment Weekly gave the season a positive review calling it "Charmingly goofy as ever, Louis-Dreyfus isn't quite believable as a vice president – even a sitcom VP whose lack of gravitas is the show's central joke. But she's still a joy to watch, especially when she shows off that famous gift for physical comedy."[34] Maureen Ryan of The Huffington Post gave the show a lukewarm review, writing: "Despite the clear talents of the assembled cast, Veep merely reinforces what most people already think and revisits territory many other politically-oriented movies and TV shows have thoroughly covered."[35] Brian Lowry of Variety gave the show a negative review and called it a "show about an always-second office becomes second-tier TV."[36]

Season 2[edit]

The second season received generally positive reviews. It averaged a Metacritic score of 75 out of 100 based on reviews from 10 critics.[37] David Hiltbrand of Philadelphia Inquirer praised the series saying "HBO's Veep is the sharpest Beltway satire the medium has ever seen, mostly because it focuses not on the power wielded by politicians, but on their desperate venality".[38] Bruce Miller of Sioux City Journal also praised the show, writing: "The show is smart—smarter than most on network television—and it has life."[39]

Season 3[edit]

The third season received critical acclaim from critics. It received a Metacritic score of 87 out of 100 based on 10 reviews.[40] It scored a rare 100% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes, with an average rating of 8.6/10. The site's consensus reads, "Veep continues its winning streak with a mix of smart comedy, bright performances and a refreshing approach to D.C. politics."[41] Matt Roush of TV Guide praised the show, and in a joint review of Veep and Silicon Valley wrote: "[Silicon Valley is] paired with the third season of the savagely hilarious Veep; this combo promises to be HBO's most robust and certainly most entertaining comedy hour in years."[42] Brandon Nowalk of The A.V Club said the show "has become the clearest heir to 30 Rock and Arrested Development, and specific bits throughout the season recall both series."[43] Tim Molloy of The Wrap praised the cast saying, "The show works because all of its actors seem so human, so likable, despite the words coming from their mouths."[44]

Home media[edit]

Season Release dates Bonus features
Region 1 Region 2 Region 4 Region A Region B
1 March 26, 2013 June 3, 2013 April 3, 2013 March 26, 2013 June 3, 2013 The Making of Veep, Veep: Misspoke, Veep: Obesity, Deleted Scenes and Outtakes, 12 Audio Commentaries with cast and crew. The Region A Blu-ray edition includes the DVD and UltraViolet/iTunes digital copy.[45]
2 March 25, 2014 June 2, 2014 May 28, 2014 March 25, 2014 June 2, 2014

Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Award Category Recipient(s) Result
2012 Critics' Choice Television Award Best Actress in a Comedy Series Julia Louis-Dreyfus Nominated
Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Comedy Series Armando Iannucci, Christopher Godsick, Frank Rich, Simon Blackwell, Tony Roche, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Stephanie Laing Nominated
Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series Julia Louis-Dreyfus Won
Outstanding Casting for a Comedy Series Jennifer Euston & Allison Jones & Pat Moran Nominated
Satellite Awards Best Actress in a Series, Comedy or Musical Julia Louis-Dreyfus Nominated
Television Critics Association Awards Individual Achievement in Comedy Julia Louis-Dreyfus Nominated
Women's Image Network Awards Best Actress in a Comedy Series Julia Louis-Dreyfus Nominated
Best Comedy Series Won
2013 AFI Awards Top 10 TV Show of 2013 Won
Critics' Choice Television Award Best Actress in a Comedy Series Julia Louis-Dreyfus Won
Best Comedy Series Nominated
Golden Globe Awards Best Actress – Television Series (Musical or Comedy) Julia Louis-Dreyfus Nominated
Television Critics Association Awards Outstanding Achievement in Comedy Nominated
Individual Achievement in Comedy Julia Louis-Dreyfus Nominated
Writers Guild of America Awards Best New Series Jesse Armstrong, Simon Blackwell, Roger Drew, Sean Gray, Armando Iannucci, Ian Martin, Tony Roche, Will Smith Nominated
Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Comedy Series Armando Iannucci, Christopher Godsick, Frank Rich, Simon Blackwell, Tony Roche, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Stephanie Laing Nominated
Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series Julia Louis-Dreyfus Won
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Tony Hale Won
Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series Anna Chlumsky Nominated
Outstanding Casting for a Comedy Series Allison Jones, Pat Moran and Jennifer Euston Nominated
2014 American Comedy Awards Best Comedy Series Nominated
Best Actress in a Comedy Series Julia Louis-Dreyfus Nominated
Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Tony Hale Nominated
Art Directors Guild Awards Best Half Hour Single-Camera Television Series Jim Gloster Won
Golden Globe Awards Best Actress – Television Series (Musical or Comedy) Julia Louis-Dreyfus Nominated
Gracie Allen Awards Outstanding Comedy Won
Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Comedy Series Armando Iannucci, Christopher Godsick, Frank Rich, Simon Blackwell, Tony Roche, Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Stephanie Laing Nominated
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series Gary Cole Nominated
Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series Julia Louis-Dreyfus Won
Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (Half-Hour) Bill MacPherson and Richard Davey Nominated
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Tony Hale Nominated
Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series Anna Chlumsky Nominated
Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series Simon Blackwell, Tony Roche and Armando Iannucci Nominated
Outstanding Art Direction for a Contemporary Program (Half-Hour or less) Jim Gloster, Sharon Davis and Jennifer Engel Nominated
Outstanding Casting for a Comedy Series Allison Jones, Pat Moran and Meredith Tucker Nominated
Producers Guild of America Awards Outstanding Producer of Episodic Television Comedy Armando Iannucci, Christopher Godsick, Frank Rich, Simon Blackwell, Tony Roche, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Stephanie Laing Nominated
Satellite Awards Best Actress in a Series, Comedy or Musical Julia Louis-Dreyfus Nominated
Screen Actors Guild Awards Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series Sufe Bradshaw, Anna Chlumsky, Gary Cole, Kevin Dunn, Tony Hale, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Reid Scott, Timothy Simons, Matt Walsh Nominated
Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series Julia Louis-Dreyfus Won
Television Critics Association Awards Outstanding Achievement in Comedy Won
Individual Achievement in Comedy Julia Louis-Dreyfus Won
Writers Guild of America Awards Best Comedy Series Simon Blackwell, Roger Drew, Sean Gray, Armando Iannucci, Ian Martin, Georgia Pritchett, David Quantick, Tony Roche, Will Smith Won

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Andreeva, Nellie. "UPDATE: Premiere Dates For HBO's 'Girls,' 'Game Of Thrones', 'Veep' & 'Game Change'". Deadline.com. Retrieved April 24, 2012. 
  2. ^ Carter, Bill (April 30, 2012). "HBO Quickly Renews 'Girls' and 'Veep'". NYTimes.com. Retrieved April 30, 2012. 
  3. ^ Kondology, Amanda (February 11, 2013). "'Veep' Season 2 Premieres April 14". TV by the Numbers. Retrieved February 11, 2013. 
  4. ^ Seat42f. "HBO Renews Veep". Retrieved May 1, 2013. 
  5. ^ TV.com. "Game of Thrones Season 4 Has a Premiere Date! As Do Veep Season 3, New Comedy Silicon Valley, and More". Retrieved January 11, 2014. 
  6. ^ Sepinwall (April 21, 2014). "HBO Renews 'Silicon Valley' & 'Veep'". HitFix. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  7. ^ "The Official Website for the HBO Series Veep". Hbo.com. Retrieved March 22, 2013. 
  8. ^ "The Official Website for the HBO Series Veep". Hbo.com. Retrieved March 22, 2013. 
  9. ^ "The Official Website for the HBO Series Veep". Hbo.com. Retrieved March 22, 2013. 
  10. ^ "The Official Website for the HBO Series Veep". Hbo.com. Retrieved March 22, 2013. 
  11. ^ "The Official Website for the HBO Series Veep". Hbo.com. Retrieved March 22, 2013. 
  12. ^ "The Official Website for the HBO Series Veep". Hbo.com. Retrieved March 22, 2013. 
  13. ^ "The Official Website for the HBO Series Veep". Hbo.com. Retrieved March 22, 2013. 
  14. ^ Andreeva, Nellie. "Sam Richardson Upped To Regular On ‘Veep’". deadline.com. Retrieved September 23, 2014. 
  15. ^ "The Official Website for the HBO Series Veep". Hbo.com. Retrieved June 15, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Christopher Guest Jumps Into 'The Thick of It'". Zap2it.com. Retrieved March 16, 2007. 
  17. ^ "Platt, 'Piz' Pluck Pilot Parts". Zap2it.com. Retrieved March 16, 2007. 
  18. ^ "'Gilmore' Regular Joins ABC Pilot". Zap2it.com. Retrieved March 16, 2007. 
  19. ^ Goodman, Tim (May 21, 2007). "Sometimes buzz about TV pilots is just a lot of hot air". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved May 27, 2007. 
  20. ^ a b Rosser, Michael (April 24, 2009). "Iannacci in talks with HBO over US Thick of It". Broadcast. Retrieved April 24, 2009. 
  21. ^ "Rejected by ABC, political satire sparks interest". Reuters. Archived from the original on June 7, 2007. Retrieved June 4, 2007. 
  22. ^ Deamer, Eric. "HBO Gets into the Political Satire Game with Veep". Entertainmenttell. www.technologytell.com. Retrieved April 24, 2012. 
  23. ^ a b Press Release, We Got This Covered April 17, 2011
  24. ^ a b The Hollywood Reporter: HBO Picks Up Julia Louis-Dreyfus Pilot 'Veep' to Series, Hollywood Reporter April 17, 2011
  25. ^ Julia Louis-Dreyfus – The Daily Show with Jon Stewart – 04/17/12 – Video Clip | Comedy Central – for viewers in the U.S.
  26. ^ The Daily Show with Jon Stewart – April 17, 2012 – Video Clip | The Comedy Network – for viewers in Canada
  27. ^ "AFRO, 5 October 2011". Afro.com. October 5, 2011. Retrieved March 22, 2013. 
  28. ^ "HBO's series 'VEEP' starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus begins production in Maryland", Baltimore Sun, October 3, 2011
  29. ^ Conversations with Ross: Featuring Sufe Bradshaw, http://www.rosscarey.com/2012/07/10/episode-68-featuring-sufe-bradshaw/
  30. ^ a b c d e f Johnson, Jenna (February 21, 2014). "How did ‘House of Cards’ get millions in Maryland tax credits?". Washington Post. Retrieved February 21, 2014. 
  31. ^ "Veep – Season 1 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved August 8, 2013. 
  32. ^ "Veep Season 1". rottentomatoes. Flixter. Retrieved June 6, 2014. 
  33. ^ Stuever, Hank. "‘Veep’: A playful pander in Washington’s zoo". washingtonpost.com. The Washington Post. Retrieved June 6, 2014. 
  34. ^ Brunner, Bob. "Veep". entertainmentweekly.com. Retrieved June 6, 2014. 
  35. ^ Ryan, Maureen. "'Veep' HBO Review: Political Comedy Misses The Mark". huffingtonpost.com. Retrieved June 6, 2014. 
  36. ^ Lowry, Brian. "Review: ‘Veep’". variety.com. Retrieved June 6, 2014. 
  37. ^ "Veep Season 2 Metacritic". Retrieved June 6, 2014. 
  38. ^ Hiltbrand, David (December 20, 2013). "Lots of Funny Business on TV". Retrieved June 6, 2014. 
  39. ^ Miller, Bruce (April 21, 2013). "'Veep' returns with more laughs, familiar situations". Retrieved June 6, 2014. 
  40. ^ "Veep Season 3 Reviews". metacritic.com. CBS Interactive Inc. Retrieved June 6, 2014. 
  41. ^ "Veep: Season 3". rottentomatoes. Flixter. Retrieved June 30, 2014. 
  42. ^ Roush, Matt. "Weekend TV: Silicon Valley, Thrones and Veep on HBO; AMCs' Turn". Retrieved June 6, 2014. 
  43. ^ Nowalk, Brandon (April 2, 2014). "The campaign trail brings out the best in Veep". Retrieved June 6, 2014. 
  44. ^ Molloy, Tim (April 4, 2014). "‘Veep’ Review: High Stakes Bring Out Selina Meyer's Worst". Retrieved June 6, 2014. 
  45. ^ "Veep — Blu-ray, DVD Announced for Julia Louis-Dreyfus in 'The Complete 1st Season'". TVShowsOnDVD.com. December 6, 2012. Retrieved April 13, 2013. 

External links[edit]