Vehicle registration plates of Oregon

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The U.S. state of Oregon first required its residents to register their motor vehicles and display license plates in 1911.

Passenger baseplates 1956 to present[edit]

In 1956, the U.S. states and Canadian provinces came to an agreement with the Automobile Manufacturers Association that standardized the size for license plates for vehicles, except those for motorcycles, at six inches in height by twelve inches in width, with standardized mounting holes. The 1955 (dated 1956) issue was the first Oregon license plate that complied with these standards.

All plates from 1956 until present are still valid, provided they are displayed on the vehicle to which they originally were issued.

Image First issued Design Slogan Serial format Serials issued Notes
Oregon 1962 8D-1403.jpg 1956 Embossed gold numbers on blue plate with border line; OREGON embossed in block letters centered above numbers; month of expiration embossed in top left corner none Coded by month of expiration:

1A-2345

Letters A through M indicate January through December expirations.
1960 Embossed gold numbers on blue plate with border line; OREGON embossed in block letters centered above numbers; month of expiration embossed in top left corner Pacific Wonderland embossed in block letters below numbers Coded by month of expiration:

1A-2345

Letters N through Z indicate January through December expirations.
1964 Embossed gold numbers on blue plate; border line around plate and around registration year sticker spot in bottom right corner; OREGON embossed in block letters centered below numbers; month of expiration embossed in bottom left corner none Coded by month of expiration:

ABC 123

1973 Embossed blue numbers on gold plate; border line around plate and around registration year sticker spot in bottom right corner; OREGON embossed in block letters centered below numbers; month of expiration embossed in bottom left corner none Coded by month of expiration:

ABC 123

1987 Embossed blue numbers on gold plate with border line; OREGON embossed in block letters centered below numbers none ABC 123 NAA 001 to PDM 999
July 1988 Embossed dark blue numbers on mountain skyline with pale lavender mountains, light khaki sky and pale green Douglas Fir in the center; Oregon in pale blue serifed letters centered above numbers none ABC 123 PDN 001 to QNL 999 Awarded "Plate of the Year" for best new license plate of 1988 by the Automobile License Plate Collectors Association, the first time Oregon was so honored.
Nov. 1989 Embossed dark blue numbers on mountain skyline with lavender mountains, light blue sky and dark green Douglas Fir in the center; Oregon in dark blue serifed letters centered above numbers none ABC 123 QNM 001 to ZZZ 999 Same design as previous, but with the colors changed in response to public criticism of the original colors.[1]
2004 123 ABC 001 BAA to 999 HBE (as of September 3, 2014) No change to design or colors. 001 AAA to 999 AZZ skipped to avoid confusion with optional Oregon Trail plates.

Optional types[edit]

Image Type First issued Last issued Design Serial format Serials issued Notes
Oregon Trail 1993 2000 Black on blue, yellow and green background. Embossed serials. 123 ABC 123 AAA to 999 AZZ Featured a Covered Wagon print. Printing of plates to this design ceased in 1998,[2] but the design continued to be issued to vehicle owners requesting it until the supply of pre-printed plates ran out, circa early 2000.[3]
Salmon Plates (5161919818).jpg Salmon 1998 Dark blue on multicolored background. Embossed serials. S/L 12345 S/L 00001 to present $30 surcharge supports the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and is charged at each renewal time (every two years). First available in February 1998, the Salmon design has been less popular than had been expected, and by 2002 had only raised about one-third as much revenue as originally predicted.[4]
Crater Lake Centennial 2002 White on multicolored background. Surface-printed serials. C/L 12345
C/K 12345
C/A 12345
C/L 00001 to C/L 99999
C/K 00001 to 99999
C/A 00001 to present
Awarded "Plate of the Year" for best new license plate of 2002 by the Automobile License Plate Collectors Association, the second time Oregon was so honored. Surcharge supports Crater Lake National Park.
Cultural Trust 2006 Black on multicolored background. Embossed serials. C/U 12345 C/U 00001 to present Surcharge supports the Oregon Cultural Trust.
Oregonpacificwonderlandplate.JPG Pacific Wonderland 2009 Gold on blue. Embossed serials. 9A-1234 9P-0001 to 9P-9999
9Q-0001 to 9Q-9999
9R-0001 to present
Special re-issue of plate style previously used from 1960–1964, to celebrate Oregon's 150th anniversary. Surcharge supports the Oregon State Capitol Foundation and the Oregon Historical Society. Limited to 40,000 plates.
Higher Education 2005 Same as standard design, except with school logo replacing two left-most serials. Embossed serials. A BCD A AAA to present Surcharge supports the school of choice. Available for EOU, OSU, U of O, U of P, and Willamette.
Share the Road 2008 White and yellow text on blue background. Surface-printed serials. ABCD AAAA to present Surcharge supports the Bicycle Transportation Alliance and Cycle Oregon.
[1] Wine Country May 14, 2012[5] White text on multi-colored background. Surface-printed serials. W/C 12345 W/C 00001 to present Surcharge supports "agricultural and culinary tourism".[5]

There are also special plates available for special interest vehicles, antique vehicles, veterans, and various service clubs.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Goetze, Janet (October 11, 1989). "Oregon plates are getting brighter: '89 Legislature agreed to alter color scheme". The Oregonian, p. B6.
  2. ^ Boone, Jerry (January 5, 1998). "New traffic rules for '98 multiply". The Oregonian, p. B4.
  3. ^ Oliver, Gordon (November 19, 1999). "Oregon Trail license plates going fast". The Oregonian, p. C6.
  4. ^ Martins, Cheryl (January 18, 2002). "License plate goal looks like fish tale". The Oregonian, p. D1.
  5. ^ a b "Wine Country plate available starting May 14". Oregon Department of Transportation. May 3, 2012. Retrieved September 28, 2012. 

External links[edit]