Venues of the 1948 Winter Olympics

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For the 1948 Winter Olympics in St. Moritz, Switzerland, a total of eight sports venues were used. The five venues used for the 1928 Winter Olympics were reused for these games. Three new venues were added for alpine skiing which had been added to the Winter Olympics program twelve years earlier in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany (Allied-occupied Germany during the 1948 Games). As of 2010, the bob run continues to be used for bobsleigh and skeleton while alpine skiing is popular in St. Moritz.

Venues[edit]

Venue Sports Capacity Ref.
Around the hills of St. Moritz Cross-country skiing, Nordic combined (cross-country skiing) Not listed. [1]
Cresta Run Skeleton Not listed. [2]
Kulm Ice hockey Not listed. [3]
Olympiaschanze St. Moritz Nordic combined (ski jumping), Ski jumping Not listed. [1]
Olympic Stadium Figure skating, Ice hockey (final), Speed skating Not listed. [2]
Piz Nair Alpine skiing Not listed. [1]
St. Moritz-Celerina Olympic Bobrun Bobsleigh Not listed. [2]
Suvretta Ice hockey Not listed. [3]

Before the Olympics[edit]

St. Moritz hosted the Winter Olympics previously in 1928.[4] All five venues from those games were reused for the 1948 Winter Olympics.[5][6] St. Moritz hosted the FIBT World Championships in 1931 (four-man), 1937 (four-man), 1938 (two-man), 1939 (two-man), and 1947.[7][8] Switzerland itself hosted the Ice Hockey World Championships twice in between the 1928 and 1948 Games, doing so in 1935 and 1939 though neither took place in St. Moritz.[9] As an alpine skiing venue, St. Moritz hosted the FIS Alpine World Ski Championships in 1934.[10]

During the Olympics[edit]

Midway through the second run of the bobsleigh four-man event, a water pipe burst which halted competition.[11] They still completed all four runs of the event.[12]

After the Olympics[edit]

The ski jump was renovated in 1963 to get it to a K-point of 90 m (300 ft).[13] It closed in 2006.[13] The bob run has hosted the FIBT World Championships sixteen more times since the 1948 Games, most recently in 2007.[7][8][14] St. Moritz hosted its first recorded alpine skiing World Cup event in 1971.[15] The city hosted the Alpine skiing World Championships in 1974 and 2003.[16][17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c 1948 Winter Olympics official report. pp. 6, 21. Accessed 18 October 2010. (French) & (German)
  2. ^ a b c 1948 Winter Olympics official report. pp. 6, 23. Accessed 18 October 2010. (French) & (German)
  3. ^ a b 1948 Winter Olympics official report. pp. 6, 21, 23. Accessed 18 October 2010. (French) & (German)
  4. ^ Olympic.org profile of the 1928 Winter Olympics. Accessed 18 October 2010.
  5. ^ 1928 Winter Olympics official report. Part 1. p. 46. (French) Accessed 10 October 2010.
  6. ^ 1928 Winter Olympics official report. Part 2. pp. 1-11, 14-5, 46. (French) Accessed 10 October 2010
  7. ^ a b Sports123.com list of 2-Man bobsleigh World Champions. Accessed 18 October 2010.
  8. ^ a b Sports123.com list of 4-Man bobsleigh World Champions. Accessed 18 October 2010.
  9. ^ IIHF men's World Championship medalists: 1920-2010. Accessed 18 October 2010.
  10. ^ FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1934 St. Moritz 1 February results. Accessed 18 October 2010.
  11. ^ Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2009). "Bobsleigh: Four-Man". In The Complete Book of the Winter Olympics: 2010 Edition. London: Aurum Press Limited. p. 162.
  12. ^ 1948 Winter Olympics official report. p. 65. Accessed 18 October 2010. (French)
  13. ^ a b History of the St. Moritz jump. (German) Accessed 10 October 2010.
  14. ^ Sports123.com men's skeleton world championships results since 1989. Accessed 18 October 2010
  15. ^ FIS Alpine skiing World Cup St. Moritz 16-17 January 1971 results. Accessed 18 October 2010.
  16. ^ FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 1974 St. Moritz 3-10 February results. Accessed 18 October 2010.
  17. ^ FIS Alpine World Ski Championships 2003 St. Moritz 2-16 February results. Accessed 18 October 2010.