Venues of the 1960 Summer Olympics

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1960 Summer Olympics

For the 1960 Summer Olympics, a total of thirty-four sports venues were used. The Basilica of Maxentius, the Baths of Caracalla, the Appian Way, and Via Cassia were among the ancient Roman venues used for the games. The football stadium in Florence hosted the 1934 FIFA World Cup and would later host the 1990 FIFA World Cup. Stadio Olimpico would later serve host to the 1987 IAAF World Championships in Athletics and the final venue for the 1990 FIFA World Cup. The marathon would be lit at night by Italian soldiers holding torches that included the Appian Way with a finish at the Arch of Constantine.

Venues[edit]

Venue Sports Capacity Ref.
Acqua Santa Golf Club Course Modern pentathlon (running) Not listed. [1]
Arch of Constantine Athletics (marathon - finish line) Not listed. [2][3]
Basilica of Maxentius Wrestling 5,402 [4]
Baths of Caracalla Gymnastics 5,402 [4][5]
Campo Tre Fontane Field hockey 5,000 [6][7]
Cesano Infantry School Range Shooting (300 m free rifle) Not listed. [8][9]
Stadio Artemio Franchi (Florence) Football 47,920 [10]
Stadio Olimpico Carlo Zecchini (Grosseto) Football 10.200 [10]
Gulf of Naples Sailing Not listed. [11][12]
Stadio Tommaso Fattori (L'Aquila) Football 9,285 [10]
Lake Albano Canoeing, Rowing 10,000 [13]
Lazio Pigeon Shooting Stand Shooting (shotgun trap) 2,000 [8][9]
Livorno Ardenza Stadium Football 19,238 [10]
Stadio San Paolo (Naples) Football 60,240 [10]
Olympic Velodrome Cycling (track), Field hockey 20,000 [14]
Palazzo dei Congressi Fencing, Modern pentathlon (fencing) Not listed. [15]
Palazzo dello Sport Basketball, Boxing 15,000 [16]
Palazzetto dello sport Basketball, Weightlifting Not listed. [17]
Passo Corese Modern pentathlon (riding) Not listed. [18][19]
Stadio Adriatico (Pescara) Football 24,400 [10]
Piazza di Siena Equestrian (dressage, eventing dressage/ jumping, jumping individual) 15,000 [18][20]
Piscina delle Rose Water polo 1,850 [21]
Pratoni del Vivaro Equestrian (eventing) Not listed. [18]
Raccordo Anulare Athletics (marathon) Not listed. [2]
Stadio dei Marmi Field hockey 15,000 [22][23]
Stadio Flaminio Football (final) 32,000 [24]
Stadio Olimpico Athletics 72,698 [25]
Stadio Olimpico del Nuoto Diving, Modern pentathlon (swimming), Swimming, Water polo 20,000 [26][27]
Umberto I Shooting Range Modern pentathlon (shooting), Shooting (pistol, rifle) Not listed. [8]
Via Appia Antica Athletics (marathon) Not listed. [28][29]
Via Cassia Cycling (individual road race) Not listed. [30][31]
Via Flaminia Cycling (individual road race) Not listed. [30][31]
Via Cristoforo Colombo Athletics (marathon), cycling (road team time trial) Not listed. [32][33]
Via di Grottarossa Cycling (individual road race) Not listed. [30][31]

Before the Olympics[edit]

Rome was scheduled to host the 1908 Summer Olympics, but had to withdraw due to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 1906.[34][35] The 1908 Games were given to London as a result following a meeting at the 1906 Intercalated Games in Athens.[34]

Rome hosted the ISSF World Shooting Championships (then UIT) five times from 1897 to the start of World War II, doing so in 1902, 1911, 1927, 1930, and 1935.[36]

The biggest event for Italy was hosting the 1934 FIFA World Cup in which the host nation won.[37] Florence's stadium hosted three matches during the World Cup while the finals would be played in Rome, at a stadium located on the current site of the Flaminio Stadium.[38][39][40][41] Stadio Flaminio would be constructed in 1957 following the demolition of Stadio Nazionale PNF in 1953.[42]

The Palazzo dei Congressi was constructed in 1942 for a Universal Exposition in that year that was not held to World War II.[43] Palazzetto Dello Sport was constructed in time for the 1960 Games in 1957.[17]

During the Olympics[edit]

Pope John XXIII watched some of the canoeing semifinals at the window of his summer residence overlooking Lake Albano.[44] The marathon event was run along Via Appia Antica (English: The Appian Way) and finished at the Arch of Constantine.[2] With the event being run at night, the course was illuminated by Italian soldiers holding torches.[45]

During the road team time trial event at Via Cristoforo Colombo in 93 °F (34 °C) heat, Danish cyclist Knud Enemark Jensen collapsed from sunstroke, suffered a fractured skull, and later died from it.[46] Autopsy results determined that Jensen had taken Roniacol, a blood circulation stimulant.[46] Before Jensen's collapse, Denmark had been in fourth place at the 66.6 km (41.4 mi) mark of the event.[47]

After the Olympics[edit]

Stadio Olimpico del Norto hosted the FINA World Aquatics Championships in 1994.[48]

Palazzo dei Congressi continues as an exhibition center in Rome.[43]

In 1987, Stadio Olimpico hosted the second World Athletics Championships.[49] During the following three years, the stadium was reconstructed to serve as one of the twelve venues used for the FIFA World Cup.[50] The stadium itself hosted the finals for that tournament.[50] The Stadium at Florence which hosted some of the 1934 World Cup matches, hosted four 1990 World Cup matches, including the quarterfinal match between Argentina and Yugoslavia.[51][52][53][54]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2, Part 2. p. 664. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  2. ^ a b c 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. p. 80. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  3. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2, Part 1. p. 118. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  4. ^ a b 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 76, 79. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  5. ^ 1960 Summer Olympic official report. Volume 2. Part 1. p. 345. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  6. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. p. 76. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  7. ^ 1960 Summer Olympic official report. Volume 2. Part 1. pp. 437-60. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  8. ^ a b c 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 66-7. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  9. ^ a b 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 2. p. 932. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  10. ^ a b c d e f 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 85-6. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  11. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. p. 86. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  12. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 2. pp. 963-1023. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  13. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 82-3. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  14. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 72, 74-5. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  15. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2, Part 2. pp. 661, 761. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  16. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 68, 70, 72. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  17. ^ a b 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 60, 62. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  18. ^ a b c 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. p. 81. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  19. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2, Part 2. p. 661. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  20. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2, Part 2. p. 899. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  21. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 75-6. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  22. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 64-5. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  23. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2, Part 2. pp. 437-60. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  24. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 58, 60. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  25. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 56-7. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  26. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 62-4. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  27. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 2. p. 661. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  28. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 80-81. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  29. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 1. pp. 117-8. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  30. ^ a b c 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. p. 84. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  31. ^ a b c 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 2. p. 319. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  32. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 80, 84. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  33. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 2. pp. 118, 316. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  34. ^ a b 1908 Summer Olympics official report. p. 19. Accessed 29 October 2010.
  35. ^ Geology.com information on Mount Vesuvius's history. Accessed 29 October 2010.
  36. ^ Historical medal winners of the ISSF (formerly UIT) World Championships and Olympic shooting championships since 1896. Accessed 29 October 2010.
  37. ^ FIFA.com profile of the 1934 World Cup. Accessed 29 October 2010.
  38. ^ FIFA.com World Cup match GER-ESP Florence 27 May 1934 results. Accessed 29 October 2010.
  39. ^ FIFA.com World Cup match ITA-ESP Florence 31 May 1934 results. Accessed 29 October 2010.
  40. ^ FIFA.com World Cup match ITA-ESP Florence 1 June 1934 results. Accessed 29 October 2010.
  41. ^ FIFA.com World Cup Final ITA-TCH Rome 10 June 1934 results. Accessed 29 October 2010.
  42. ^ 1934 FIFA World Cup story from Il tempo. 28 October 2009 article accessed 30 October 2010. (Italian)
  43. ^ a b PalazzoCongressi website. Accessed 30 October 2010. (English) & (Italian)
  44. ^ Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2008). "A Short History of the Modern Olympics". In The Complete Book of the Olympics: 2008 Edition. London: Aurum Press Limited. p. 19.
  45. ^ Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2008). "Track & Field (Men): Marathon". In The Complete Book of the Olympics:2008 Edition. London:Aurum Press Limited. pp. 145-6.
  46. ^ a b Wallechinsky, David and Jaime Loucky (2008). "Cycling: Men's Discontinued Events". In The Complete Book of the Olympics: 2008 Edition. London: Aurum Press Limited. p. 527.
  47. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 1. pp. 314-5. Accessed 30 October 2010.
  48. ^ Swimrankings.net of the 1994 FINA World Aquatics Championships. Accessed 30 October 2010.
  49. ^ IAAF World Championships in Athletics Rome 28 August - 6 September 1987 results. Accessed 30 October 2010.
  50. ^ a b 1990 FIFA World Cup Italy 8 June - 8 July 1990 overview. Accessed 30 October 2010.
  51. ^ FIFA World Cup Florence 10 June 1990 USA-TCH match results. Accessed 30 October 2010.
  52. ^ FIFA World Cup Florence 15 June 1990 AUT-TCH match results. Accessed 30 October 2010.
  53. ^ FIFA World Cup Florence 19 June 1990 AUT-USA match results. Accessed 30 October 2010.
  54. ^ FIFA World Cup Florence 30 June 1990 ARG-YUG quarterfinal results. Accessed 30 October 2010.