Verizon Communications v. Law Offices of Curtis V. Trinko, LLP

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Verizon Communications v. Law Offices of Curtis V. Trinko, LLP
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued October 14, 2003
Decided January 13, 2004
Full case name Verizon Communications, Petitioner v. Law Offices of Curtis V. Trinko, LLP
Citations 540 U.S. 398 (more)
Holding
Respondent's complaint alleging breach of an incumbent LEC's 1996 Act duty to share its network with competitors does not state a claim under §2 of the Sherman Act.
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority Scalia, joined by Rehnquist, O'Connor, Kennedy, Ginsburg, Breyer
Concurrence Stevens, joined by Souter, Thomas

Verizon Communications v. Law Offices of Curtis V. Trinko, LLP, often shortened to Verizon v. Trinko, 540 U.S. 398 (2004), is a case decided by the Supreme Court of the United States in the field of Antitrust law. It held that the Telecommunications Act of 1996 had not modified the framework of the Sherman Act, preserving claims that satisfy established antitrust standards without creating new claims that go beyond those standards. More importantly, it refused to extend the essential facilities doctrine beyond the facts of the controversial Aspen Skiing Co. v. Aspen Highlands Skiing Corp. case.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]