Vermont Route 9

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Vermont Route 9 marker

Vermont Route 9
Route information
Maintained by VTrans
Length: 46.957 mi[1] (75.570 km)
Major junctions
West end: NY 7 in Bennington
 
East end: NH 9 in Brattleboro
Location
Counties: Bennington, Windham
Highway system

State highways in Vermont

VT 8A VT 10

Vermont Route 9 (VT 9) is a state highway in the U.S. state of Vermont. The highway runs 46.957 miles (75.570 km) from the New York state line in Bennington, where it continues west as New York Route 7 (NY 7), to the New Hampshire state line at the Connecticut River in Brattleboro, where the highway continues as New Hampshire Route 9 (NH 9). VT 9 is the primary east–west highway of Bennington and Windham counties in southern Vermont. The highway connects Southern Vermont's primary towns of Bennington and Brattleboro via its crossing of the Green Mountains. VT 9 also connects those towns with Troy, New York, and Keene, New Hampshire, via the connecting highways in those states. The highway also intersects three major north–south routes: U.S. Route 7 (US 7) in Bennington and Interstate 91 (I-91) and US 5 in Brattleboro.

Route description[edit]

VT 9 begins at the New York state line in the town of Bennington in western Bennington County. The highway continues west as NY 7 (Mapletown Road) toward Hoosick and Troy. A short distance west of the state line, NY 7 has a junction with the west end of the Bennington Bypass (VT 279 in Vermont), a two-lane freeway that allows VT 9 traffic to bypass the center of town. VT 9 heads east as West Road and passes south of William H. Morse State Airport and has a pair of sharp curves as it passes through Old Bennington, which is south of the Bennington Battle Monument and north of Southern Vermont College. The highway continues as Main Street to downtown Bennington, where it intersects US 7, which follows North Street and South Street in the respective directions. East of downtown, VT 9 meets the eastern end of VT 279 at a half–single-point urban interchange. The highway leaves Bennington along Woodford Road and crosses and begins to parallel the Walloomsac River as the river and highway enter the Green Mountains.

VT 9 continues along the river into the town of Woodford. The highway has a curvaceous ascent along the City Stream branch of the river to the town center of Woodford; during the ascent, the highway intersects the Appalachian Trail and Long Trail. VT 9 reaches the source of City Stream at Big Pond and summits the Green Mountains. The highway meets the northern end of VT 8 in Searsburg, where the highway descends from the main range of the Green Mountains and begins to parallel the Deerfield River. VT 9 enters Windham County and the town of Wilmington just west of the Harriman Reservoir. The highway continues along the North Branch of the river into the town center of Wilmington, where the highway intersects VT 100 (North Main Street). VT 9 and VT 100 run concurrently follow Beaver Brook to their split east of the town center. The highway ascends Hogback Mountain along Beaver Brook to the stream's source. The route passes Molly Stark State Park and enters the town of Marlboro west of the summit. VT 9 passes to the north of the center of Marlboro and enters the valley of Whetstone Brook, which the highway follows into the town of Brattleboro.

VT 9's name becomes Western Avenue as it passes through the community of West Brattleboro. The highway has an elongated partial cloverleaf interchange with I-91 west of downtown Brattleboro. The route enters the downtown area along High Street, then turns north and joins US 5 on Main Street. VT 9 and US 5 meet the southern end of VT 30 at a circle around part of the Brattleboro Retreat property formed by Linden Street, Putney Road, and Park Place. VT 9 and US 5 leave the circle along Putney Road and cross the West River. The state highway and the U.S. Highway pass through a commercial area and diverge at a four-legged roundabout. The west leg of the roundabout is a connector to a trumpet interchange with I-91. VT 9 heads east along Chesterfield Road, which passes under the New England Central Railroad on its way to the New Hampshire state line at the Connecticut River, where the highway continues as NH 9 (Franklin Pierce Highway) toward Keene. The highway crosses the river by the United States Navy Seabees Bridge, a through arch bridge that parallels another through arch bridge for pedestrians and cyclists, the Justice Harlan Fiske Stone Bridge.

VT 9 is known as Molly Stark Trail throughout its course. The highway is a part of the National Highway System from the New York state line to I-91, and again from I-91 and US 5 to the Connecticut River. I-91 bridges the National Highway System gap in VT 9 and forms a bypass of Brattleboro for the state highway.[2]

History[edit]

New England 9.svg

VT 9 follows the course of the 1920s era New England Interstate Route 9, a part of the New England road marking system that ran from Bennington, through Concord, New Hampshire, to Wells, Maine.

Major intersections[edit]

County Location Mile
[1]
km Destinations Notes
Bennington Bennington 0.000 0.000 NY 7 Western terminus; New York state line
4.397 7.076 US 7 (North Street/South Street)
5.801 9.336 VT 279 west
Searsburg 18.266 29.396 VT 8 south
Windham Wilmington 25.070 40.346 VT 100 north (North Main Street) West end of concurrency with VT 100
26.140 42.068 VT 100 south East end of concurrency with VT 100
Brattleboro 43.350 69.765 I‑91 I-91 Exit 2
44.416 71.481 US 5 south (Main Street) South end of concurrency with US 5
44.575 71.737 VT 30 north (Linden Street)
46.763 75.258 US 5 north (Putney Road) / I‑91 North end of concurrency with US 5; intersection with connector to I-91 Exit 3
Connecticut River 46.957 75.570 NH 9 east Eastern terminus; New Hampshire state line
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2010 (Route Log) AADTs - State Highways". Vermont Agency of Transportation. May 2011. Retrieved May 10, 2013. 
  2. ^ Federal Highway Administration (October 1, 2012) (PDF). National Highway System: Vermont (Map). http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/national_highway_system/nhs_maps/vermont/vt_Vermont.pdf. Retrieved 2014-01-04.