Veronika Tushnova

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Veronika Tushnova
Veronika Tushnova.jpg
Born (1911-03-27)March 27, 1911
Kazan, Russia
Died July 7, 1965(1965-07-07) (aged 54)
Moscow, Soviet Union

Veronika Mikhailovna Tushnova (Russian: Верони́ка Миха́йловна Тушно́ва; March 27, 1911 – July 7, 1965) was a Soviet poet and member of the USSR Union of Writers.

Biography[edit]

Tushnova graduated from high school where she had pursued advanced studies of foreign languages. After graduating, at the insistence of her father, who wanted her to be a doctor, she entered the Leningrad Medical Institute where she studied for four years prior to 1935.

In 1936, after the death of her father and mother, she moved back to Leningrad, where she received her medical degree, but she found little satisfaction in being a doctor. At this time she married a psychiatrist named George Rozinsky.

She served in World War 2. Her first works were printed in 1944. She published several collections of poems: First Book (1945), Pathway (1954). Her keen lyrical talent was revealed in the collections Memory of the Heart (1958), One Hundred Hours of Happiness (1965) and others, in which she writes about higher love and calls for truly human relations among people.

She also worked as a literary translator. She died from cancer in Moscow on July 7, 1965.

Family[edit]

She was married twice, but both marriages ended in divorce. She had a daughter from her first marriage named Natalia (Natalia Rozinskaya).

In her last years Tushnova was involved in an affair with the poet Alexander Yashin, but he couldn't leave his family (Yashin had four children). Yashin died exactly three years after Tushnova, also from cancer.

Poetry collections[edit]

  • Первая книга- First Book (1945)
  • Пути-дороги- Pathway (1954)
  • Дорога на Клухор- The Road to Klukhor (1956)
  • Память сердца- Memory of the Heart (1958)
  • Второе дыхание- Second Wind (1961)
  • Лирика- Lyrics (1963, 1969)
  • Сто часов счастья- One Hundred Hours of Happiness (1965)
  • Стихи- Poems (1969)

Source[edit]

This article incorporates information from the equivalent article on the Russian Wikipedia.