Veruela, Agusan del Sur

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Veruela
Municipality
Map of Agusan del Sur with Veruela highlighted
Map of Agusan del Sur with Veruela highlighted
Veruela is located in Philippines
Veruela
Veruela
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 08°02′N 125°54′E / 8.033°N 125.900°E / 8.033; 125.900Coordinates: 08°02′N 125°54′E / 8.033°N 125.900°E / 8.033; 125.900
Country Philippines
Region Caraga (Region XIII)
Province Agusan del Sur
District 2nd district of Agusan del Sur
Barangays 20
Government[1]
 • Mayor Salimar T. Mondejar
Area[2]
 • Total 385.45 km2 (148.82 sq mi)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 40,457
 • Density 100/km2 (270/sq mi)
Time zone PST (UTC+8)
ZIP code 8509
Dialing code 85
Income class 2nd

Veruela is a second class municipality in the province of Agusan del Sur, Philippines. According to the 2010 census, it has a population of 40,457 people.[3]

History[edit]

Veruela was considered the oldest town of upper Agusan del Sur. As handed from generations, it was believed that Veruela got its name from the word “virus”. This happened in the later part of 18th century where the whole area was suffering from small pox and cholera when the Spanish missionaries chanced upon the tribe. From then on, thus, the name Veruela existed out of the Spanish word “La Verus”.

Later the Manobo tribes moved to Manning, better known as Linongsuran along the enormous Agusan River. However, in 1916 when the great earthquake destroyed the settlement, it erased the Linongsuran from the map of Agusan Province leaving no trace of the settlement. The survivors evacuated and reorganized themselves into another place, now the barangay poblacion of the municipality.

In the 18th century, the Muslim tribes in Davao invaded the Manobos in Agusan. But the Manobos fought against the Muslims. The first known leader of the inhabitants was Eladio Manguyod, a strong and influential datu of the Manobo tribe, who led his people to victories after a hard fought battle and drove the Muslim out of Agusan. It was also during those time when the tribe was converted into Christianity. It was their strong belief that they owed their victories to Datu Manguyod as well as their patron Saint John.

Veruela became a municipality by virtue of an Executive Order No. 147 proclaimed by President Diosdado Macapagal on March 31, 1965 during the term of Congressman Guillermo Sanchez, who once also served as mayor of the town. Since its formal creation as a municipality, Veruela had undergone a series of eight different administrations.

On April 18, 1986, right after EDSA Revolution, Vicente C. del Rosario was appointed as officer – in Charge of the municipality of Veruela by President Corazon Aquino. From then on, he ran and served several terms as mayor.

The municipality of Veruela has a silent dispute with the nearby province of Compostela Valley regarding the boundary between the two in Barangay Del Monte. The local governments are trying to solve the issue amicably.

Barangays[edit]

Veruela is politically subdivided into 20 barangays.[2]

  • Anitap
  • Bacay II
  • Binongan
  • Caigangan
  • Candiis
  • Del Monte
  • Don Mateo
  • Katipunan
  • La Fortuna
  • Limot
  • Magsaysay
  • Masayan
  • Poblacion
  • Sampaguita
  • San Gabriel
  • Santa Cruz
  • Santa Emelia
  • Sawagan
  • Sinobong
  • Sisimon

Demographics[edit]

Population census of Veruela
Year Pop. ±% p.a.
1990 20,129 —    
1995 28,185 +6.51%
2000 28,685 +0.38%
2007 30,074 +0.65%
2010 40,457 +11.40%
Source: National Statistics Office[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Official City/Municipal 2013 Election Results". Intramuros, Manila, Philippines: Commission on Elections (COMELEC). 1 July 2013. Retrieved 5 September 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Province: AGUSAN DEL SUR". PSGC Interactive. Makati City, Philippines: National Statistical Coordination Board. Retrieved 10 April 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c "Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay: as of May 1, 2010". 2010 Census of Population and Housing. National Statistics Office. Retrieved 10 April 2014. 

External links[edit]