Vesuvio Playground

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Coordinates: 40°43′30″N 74°00′09″W / 40.725016°N 74.002635°W / 40.725016; -74.002635

Vesuvio Playground
Thompson Street Playground
(former name)
Location on the corner of Thompson Street and Spring Street off of Prince Street in SoHo, in Manhattan, New York City
Area 0.64-acre (2,600 m2)

Vesuvio Playground is an 0.64-acre (2,600 m2) neighborhood park located on the corner of Thompson Street and Spring Street off of Prince Street in SoHo, in Manhattan, New York City.[1][2]

It was named in the late 1990s after the nearby popular Vesuvio Bakery on Prince Street, which was in turn named for the stratovolcano Mount Vesuvius, which in 79 A.D. erupted destroying the Roman city of Pompeii.[2][3] The park was named to honor the owner of the bakery; it could not be named after him because Parks Department policy prohibited the naming of the park after a living person.[4]

The playground was formerly named Thompson Street Playground, after the adjacent Thompson Street. That street was in turn named after Revolutionary War Brigadier General William Thompson in the late 18th century.[1]

The playground's land was purchased by the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation in three purchases – in 1929, 1930, and 1957.[1]

The park has basketball courts, handball courts, bocce courts, a three-foot mini-pool, playgrounds, sandboxes, water fountains, spray showers, and public bathrooms.[1] [2][2] A $2.9 million renovation of the park was completed in 2007.[5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Vesuvio Playground Highlights - Thompson Playground: NYC Parks". Nycgovparks.org. Retrieved December 12, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Vesuvio Playground". Nycgo.com. Retrieved December 12, 2012. 
  3. ^ "A mountain of upgrades coming at Vesuvio Playground". Thevillager.com. Retrieved December 12, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Board 2 supports renaming local playground after Anthony Dapolito". Thevillager.com. August 12, 2003. Retrieved December 12, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Vesuvio flows — with water". Thevillager.com. Retrieved December 12, 2012. 
  6. ^ Alexis Lipsitz Flippin (2011). Frommer's New York City with Kids. Frommer's. Retrieved December 12, 2012.