Vi Hilbert

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Vi Hilbert (née Anderson, Lushootseed name: taqʷšəblu, July 24, 1918 – December 19, 2008) was a Native American tribal elder of the Upper Skagit, a tribe of the greater Puget Salish in Washington State, whose ancestors occupied the banks along the Skagit River, and was a conservationist of the Lushootseed language and culture. She was named a Washington State Living Treasure in 1989, and received a National Heritage Fellowship from the National Endowment of the Arts, presented by President Bill Clinton, in 1994. She co-wrote Lushootseed grammars and dictionaries, and published books of stories, teachings, and place names related to her native region, the Puget Sound (also known as Whulge in anglicized Lushootseed).

Childhood[edit]

Vi was born to Charlie and Louise Anderson on July 24, 1918 near Lyman, Washington, on the Upper Skagit River. Her father was a fisherman, a logger, and a canoe maker, whose canoe the Question Mark is housed in the Smithsonian Museum Archive.

Death[edit]

Vi Hilbert died at her home in La Conner on the morning of December 19, 2008. She was surrounded by her family at the time of her death.[1]

The taqʷšəblu Vi Hilbert Ethnobotanical Garden at Seattle University is named in her honor.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Upper Skagit Tribe elder dies". Skagit County's News and Information Source, goskagit.com (Dec. 19, 2008). Retrieved 2013-04-04. 
  2. ^ "Ethnobotanical Garden - Sustainability". Seattle University, College of Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 2013-04-20.