ViaSat

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This article is about the American military and commercial communications company. For Viasat, a DBS distributor and TV broadcaster, see Viasat.
ViaSat, Inc.
Type Public
Traded as NASDAQVSAT
Industry Communications
Founded Carlsbad, California, United States 1986 (1986)
Key people
Products
Revenue US$863,600,000 (2011)
Net income US$7,500,000 (2011)
Employees 2,550 (2011)
Subsidiaries
Website viasat.com

ViaSat is a communication company based in Carlsbad, California. It provides equipment and services for military and commercial communications, primarily in satellite related technologies.[1] ViaSat was ranked 135 on the 200 Best Small Companies list by Forbes in October 2010[2] and was ranked 31st by Space News on its list of the Top 50 Space Companies with $414 million in revenues from space business in 2008.[3]

Subdivisions[edit]

ViaSat Communications[edit]

This entity, formerly known as WildBlue Communications, is ViaSat's two-way satellite Internet service provider subdivision.[4] Serving over 600,000 subscribers[5] within the 48 contiguous United States, the company offers services to home and business customers directly[6] and via resellers including DirecTV, DISH Network,[7] AT&T[8] and the National Rural Telecommunications Cooperative (NRTC).

In January 2012, ViaSat launched a new, much faster satellite Internet service called Exede by ViaSat.[9] The service increases the speed and capacity of satellite Internet by a factor of 10 through the use of the ViaSat high-capacity satellite system, which includes the 140 Gbit/s ViaSat-1 satellite.

WildBlue launched as an independent company in October 2004 after gaining access rights to the Telesat Anik F2 satellite. It conducted formal technical testing until January 2005, followed by nationwide beta testing, before the first residential retail customers had services installed in June 2005.[10] A dealer network was established to provide installation and customer service to clients throughout the 48 contiguous United States. The company was acquired by ViaSat on October 1, 2009 for $568 million (in cash and stock). The division currently holds 44% of the U.S. satellite ISP market.[11]

On October 6, 2011, a software error knocked out Anik F2, one of the satellites serving WildBlue customers, for approximately one day.[12][13][14]

Comsat Labs[edit]

Comsat Laboratories is Viasat's technology and Product Development group for satellite communication systems focusing on developing new technologies for extremely bandwidth efficient, high data rate satellite transmission, such as:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Freeman, Mike (December 28, 2009). "ViaSat CEO Aiming for the Sky". San Diego Union-Tribune. Retrieved December 28, 2009. 
  2. ^ "200 Best Small Companies". Forbes. October 2010. Retrieved August 27, 2009. 
  3. ^ "2009 Top 50 Space Industry Companies". Imaginova Corp. 2009. Retrieved August 27, 2010. 
  4. ^ Barris, Mike (October 1, 2006). "ViaSat To Buy Internet Provider WildBlue For $568 Million". Dow Jones Newswires. Retrieved October 22, 2006. 
  5. ^ de Selding, Peter B. (Feb 12, 2014). "ViaSat Gears Up for Loral Trial, Reports Slower Exede Growth". SpaceNews. Retrieved 4 May 2014. 
  6. ^ "Satellites Bring Broadband Home". The Institution of Engineering and Technology. November 8, 2010. Retrieved November 29, 2010. 
  7. ^ "DISH Network High Speed Internet powered by WildBlue". DISH Network. Retrieved November 29, 2010. 
  8. ^ "Now in your neck of the woods". AT&T. Retrieved November 29, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Exede:The satellite broadband service you've been waiting for?". CBS Interactive. January 19, 2012. Retrieved June 4, 2012. 
  10. ^ "WildBlue Readies Satellite Broadband Service for Rollout". Satellite Today. May 23, 2005. Retrieved November 29, 2010. 
  11. ^ Yao, Deborah (October 1, 2006). "Satellite equipment maker ViaSat buying WildBlue". Associated Press. Retrieved October 22, 2006. 
  12. ^ "Satellite problems ground Nunavut flights". CBC News. October 6, 2011. Retrieved May 12, 2012. 
  13. ^ Tariq Malik (October 7, 2011). "Canadian Satellite Malfunction Leaves Thousands Without Communications". Space.com. Retrieved May 12, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Services Restored on Telesat's ANIK F2 Satellite After Anomaly" (Press release). Telesat. October 7, 2011. Retrieved May 15, 2012. 

External links[edit]