Vic Heyliger

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Vic Heyliger
Vic Heyliger (1950).jpg
Vic Heyliger from the 1950 Michiganensian
Sport(s) Ice hockey
Biographical details
Born (1912-09-26)September 26, 1912
Concord, Massachusetts
Died October 4, 2006(2006-10-04) (aged 94)
Colorado Springs, Colorado
Playing career
1934–1937
1937–1938
1937–1938
1938–1939
1943–1944
Michigan
St. Paul Saints
Chicago Blackhawks
Detroit Holzbaugh
Chicago Blackhawks
Position(s) Center
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1939–1943
1944–1957
1961–1963
1965–1966
1968–1974
Illinois
Michigan
West Germany National Team
US National Team
Air Force
Head coaching record
Overall 352-157-21
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1948 NCAA National Championship
1951 NCAA National Championship
1952 NCAA National Championship
1953 MCHL Regular Season Championship
1953 NCAA National Championship
1955 NCAA National Championship
1956 WIHL Regular Season Championship
1956 NCAA National Championship
Awards
1954 Spencer Penrose Award
1974 US Hockey Hall of Fame
1980 University of Michigan Athletic Hall of Honor
1982 Hobey Baker Legend of College Hockey Award
1988 John MacInnes Award
Records
Most NCAA ice hockey championships: (6)
Most consecutive NCAA ice hockey championships: (3)
Most consecutive Frozen Four appearances: (10)

Victor Heyliger (September 26, 1912 – October 4, 2006) was a National Hockey League center and the head coach of the University of Michigan ice hockey team.[1]

Career[edit]

Born in Concord, Massachusetts, he attended the Lawrence Academy in Groton, Massachusetts and as an All-American at Michigan set a school record of 116 goals. He played for the Chicago Black Hawks in 1938 and 1944,[2] bookending his tenure as coach at the University of Illinois from 1939–43,[3] posting a record of 59–29–4.[4]

Returning to Michigan as coach of the Wolverines, he led the team to six NCAA Men's Ice Hockey Championships in his thirteen years from 1944 to 1957: 1948 (the first NCAA title), 1951, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956. His teams reached the Frozen Four in each of the first ten seasons it was held.

In 1954 he received the Spencer Penrose Award from the American Hockey Coaches Association as the University Division Coach of the Year. Heyliger had an overall Michigan record of 228–61–13. After coaching the U.S. national team in 1966, he coached at the United States Air Force Academy from 1966–74, where he was 85–77–3.[5]

He was inducted into the United States Hockey Hall of Fame in its second class of inductees in 1974. In 1988 he was awarded the John MacInnes Award by the AHCA, an honor which recognizes those individuals who have displayed an interest in amateur hockey and youth programs, as well as fostering high graduation rates among their players.

He died at his home in Colorado Springs, Colorado, aged 94.[6][7]

College Head Coaching record[8][9][10][edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Illinois Fighting Illini (Division I Independent) (1939-40–1942-43)
1939-40 Illinois 3-11-0
1940-41 Illinois 17-3-1
1941-42 Illinois 10-4-2
1942-43 Illinois 9-1-0
Illinois: 39-19-3
Michigan Wolverines (Division I Independent) (1944-45–1950-51)
1944-45 Michigan 3-6-0
1945-46 Michigan 17-7-1
1946-47 Michigan 13-7-1
1947-48 Michigan 20-2-1 NCAA National Champion
1948-49 Michigan 20-2-3 NCAA Consolation Game (Win)
1949-50 Michigan 23-4-0 NCAA Consolation Game (Win)
1950-51 Michigan 22-4-1 NCAA National Champion
Michigan: 118-32-7
Michigan Wolverines (MCHL) (1951-52–1952-53)
1951-52 Michigan 22-4-0 9-3-0 t-2nd NCAA National Champion
1952-53 Michigan 17-7-0 12-4-0 t-1st NCAA National Champion
Michigan: 39-11-0 21-7-0
Michigan Wolverines (WIHL) (1953-54–1956-57)
1953-54 Michigan 15-6-2 12-3-1 2nd NCAA Consolation Game (Win)
1954-55 Michigan 18-5-1 13-5-0 2nd NCAA National Champion
1955-56 Michigan 20-2-1 15-2-1 1st NCAA National Champion
1956-57 Michigan 18-5-2 13-4-1 2nd NCAA Runner-Up
Michigan: 71-18-6 53-14-3
Air Force Falcons (Division I Independent) (1968-69–1973-74)
1968–69 Air Force 6-12-0
1969-70 Air Force 11-17-1
1970–71 Air Force 15-11-2
1971–72 Air Force 25-6-0
1972–73 Air Force 16-16-0
1973–74 Air Force 12-15-0
Air Force: 85-77-3
Total: 352-157-21

      National champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Vic Heyliger". HockeyDB.com. 
  2. ^ "Vic Heyliger". Hockey-Reference.com. 
  3. ^ Charles Bartlett (December 5, 1941). "HEYLIGER SEES BIG FUTURE FOR COLLEGE HOCKEY: Illini Coach Says It May Rival Golf". Chicago Daily Tribune. 
  4. ^ "Vic Heyliger". Legends of Hockey. 
  5. ^ "16 Greatest Coaches". Inside College Hockey. September 17, 2003. 
  6. ^ "Legendary Michigan Coach Vic Heyliger Dies: Led Wolverines To Six NCAA Titles, Was First Air Force Varsity Coach". USCHO. 
  7. ^ "Vic Heyliger, former national hockey team coach, dies at 87". Associated Press Archive. October 4, 2006. 
  8. ^ "Vic Heyliger Year-By Year Coaching Record". USCHO.com. Retrieved 2014-07-11. 
  9. ^ "Michigan Wolverines Through the Years". Michigan Wolverines. Retrieved 2014-07-11. 
  10. ^ "2013-14 Air Force Media Guide". ISSUU.com. Retrieved 2014-07-11. 

External links[edit]

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
John Mariucci
Spencer Penrose Award
1953–54
Succeeded by
Cooney Weiland