Vic Moore

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Vic Moore
Born (1943-08-23) August 23, 1943 (age 71)
Cincinnati, Ohio
Residence Lumberton, North Carolina
Style Shuri-ryū Karate, Kempo Karate, Shotokan Karate
Teacher(s) Robert Trias, William J. Dometrich, Ronald Williams, Barry Yasuto
Rank      10th dan black belt in Shuri-ryū
     1st dan black belt in Kempo
     1st dan black belt in Shotokan
Notable students Chisato Mishima

Victor Moore (born August 23, 1943) holds a 10th Degree Black Belt in Karate[1] and was one of the late Robert Trias' Chief instructors of the Shuri-ryū Karate system.[2] Moore was one of the first ten original members of the Trias International Society[3] and also studied and trained with William J. Dometrich in the style of Chito-ryu.[4] Moore has studied martial arts for over 50 years, and is a four-time world karate champion.[5]

History[edit]

Moore began to travel with a handful of his students to several tournaments as far away as Canada. He later ventured out opening karate schools throughout the Cincinnati area[6] and began traveling the Midwest and East coast. Being successful in competition,[5] he meets the father of American Karate Robert A. Trias. Robert Trias with his skills and ability took Moore under his wings.[7] He continued to train with Trias at various tournaments and seminars, learning the Kenpo and Goju-Ryu styles of Karate, Moore traveled many times to the USKA headquarters in Phoenix, Arizona where he had received rank up through his Masters level while in the USKA. Trias taught many style, but his main style was Shuri-Ryu. While Moore spent time in the USKA, Maung Gyi took him under his wings, taking him as a personal student. Gyi taught him Bando, stick fighting, and all the various weapons too numerous to name. Gyi was also Moore’s kickboxing instructor, teaching Moore all the moves of thai boxing. Later, Vic Moore and Joe Lewis introduced kick boxing to America on the Merv Griffin TV show in 1973.[2] Moore and Joe Lewis were the first to introduce kickboxing on national TV and were some of the first professional kickboxers in the United States.[8] Jim Harrison defeated Moore in the first kickboxing tournament in the United States. Grandmaster Vic Moore gives seminar's all over the USA and lives in Lumberton, NC where he teaches privately from his home.

Martial arts pioneer[edit]

  • One of the first African-Americans to win a major karate competition (1965 USKA Grand Nationals).[9]
  • First kickboxing championship (1971 U.S. Kickboxing Championships) with Jim Harrison.[8]
  • Introduced kickboxing to America with Joe Lewis in 1973 on Merv Griffin.[2]
  • Black Karate feature film[10] with Jim McLean and Robert Trias[9]
  • Formed the WKA organization in 1974[9]

Competition[edit]

Moore has fought some of the top fighters in the world and also competed against Michael G. Foster (Miami 1965),[11] Mike Stone,[12] Jim 'Ronin' Harrison,[8] Fred Wren,[13] Chuck Norris,[14] Joe Lewis,[15] Al Gene Caraulia[citation needed] and from the Taekwondo Hall of Fame Skipper Mullins[citation needed], Pat Burleson[citation needed], and Allen Steen[citation needed].

World championships[edit]

  1. 1966 Defeating the all Hawaiian champion in Richmond Virginia.[16]
  2. 1968 Defeating Joe Lewis[15] at the World's Fair Karate Championships.[17]
  3. 1969 Defeating Mike Stone[12] in Pasadena California for the light heavyweight championship at the world teams championship.[18]
  4. 1970 Defeated the legendary Bill “Superfoot” Wallace in for the USKA first professional world championship.[17]

Moore placed in every tournament he competed in from 1965 to 1975 when he retired from competition.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Victor Moore.org "The Web Site about Victor Moore"
  2. ^ a b c Victor Moore: The man who fought them all.
  3. ^ Robert A. Trias, "The Pinnacle of Karate, The Completed Publication" (1989), pg. 107.
  4. ^ James L. Davenport "My Martial Arts Training"
  5. ^ a b Jenifer Perry, Trudi The Karate Chimp-ion of the World (Karate Illustrated, August 1981), pg. 27.
  6. ^ John Corcoran, Emil Farkas "The Original Martial Arts Encyclopedia", pg. 357.
  7. ^ Victor Moore "The History of Victor Moore"
  8. ^ a b c Mike Miles "A History of Kickboxing"
  9. ^ a b c d Jenifer Perry, Trudi The Karate Chimp-ion of the World (Karate Illustrated, August 1981), pg. 28.
  10. ^ Robert A. Trias, "The Pinnacle of Karate, The Completed Publication" (1989), pg. 22.
  11. ^ Robert A. Trias, "The Pinnacle of Karate, The Completed Publication" (1989), pg. 393.
  12. ^ a b Jim Coleman, Mike "The Animal" Stone. Was He Karate's Greatest Fighter? (Black Belt Magazine, Sept 1990 Vol.28 No.9), pg. 20.
  13. ^ USKA, "Grand Nationals Flyer", pg. 23.
  14. ^ Chuck Norris
  15. ^ a b John Corcoran, Emil Farkas "The Original Martial Arts Encyclopedia", pg. 254.
  16. ^ April 2008 Michel Durand "USA Story of Karate"
  17. ^ a b Mary Townsley, USKA Grand Nationals (Official Karate, Feb 1970 Vol.2 No.5), pg. 24.
  18. ^ John Corcoran, Emil Farkas "The Original Martial Arts Encyclopedia", pg. 382.

External links[edit]

Vic Moore Martial Arts Biography