Victor Hobson

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Victor Hobson
No. --     Free Agent
Linebacker
Personal information
Date of birth: (1980-02-03) February 3, 1980 (age 34)
Place of birth: Mount Laurel Township, New Jersey
Height: 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) Weight: 254 lb (115 kg)
Career information
College: Michigan
NFL Draft: 2003 / Round: 2 / Pick: 53
Debuted in 2003 for the New York Jets
Last played in 2008 for the New England Patriots
Career history
*Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards

Victor Brian Hobson (born February 3, 1980) is a former American Football Linebacker and an Executive Producer for AmVic Entertainment.[1][2] He was drafted in the second round of the 2003 draft by the New York Jets and during the rest of his NFL career he played for the New England Patriots, Cincinnati Bengals, and Arizona Cardinals.[1] He played college football at the University of Michigan.[3]

Early life[edit]

Hobson was born in Mount Laurel, NJ where he grew up for most of his life.[4] He commuted from New Jersey to Philadelphia for his high-school football career where he attended St. Joseph’s Preparatory.[5] His coach saw that Hobson had large hands and feet to accompany his awkward walk and thin 6-2 frame and thus was nicknamed “Little Pup.”[6][7] At the end of his sophomore year he had grown to a 215 pound frame, meriting the nickname “Big Dog.”[6][7] At St. Joe’s he started at both middle linebacker and tight end.[8] In 1997 he led the St. Joe’s prep football team to their first championship in 20 years and was voted the Catholic leagues best all-around player.[6][8] Among almost 40 division I football offers he chose to attend his lifetime favorite school, the University of Michigan.[9]

Football career[edit]

Collegiate[edit]

At The University of Michigan, Hobson started 39 of 49 games for the Wolverines, registering 277 tackles, 15 sacks, 3 fumble recoveries, 4 forced fumbles, 6 passes defensed, and 2 interceptions.[5] His 47 stops for losses placed him third all time in Michigan history behind Curtis Greer and Mark Messner.[10] He entered the NFL draft after his senior year at Michigan.[5]

NFL[edit]

After an NFL combine listed him as the number 2 out of 34 linebacker prospects, he was drafted 53rd overall in the second round by the New York Jets, joining his fellow Michigan teammate B.J. Askew (fullback), also drafted by the Jets in 2003.[1][11][12][13] Hobson lasted five seasons in New York, playing in Super Bowl XXXIX in 2005 against the New England Patriots.[14] In 2006 he registered a career high 100 tackles on 66 solo tackles and 34 assisted tackles and 6 sacks.[15]

NFL statistics[edit]

Year Team GP Tackles Pass Def, Interceptions
Total Solo Ast Sack Int TDs Yds Avg Lng
2008 Arizona Cardinals 1 1 1 0 0 -- 0 -- -- 0 --
2008 Cincinnati Bengals 2 0 0 0 -- -- -- -- -- 0 --
2007 New York Jets 16 62 48 14 2 4 -- -- -- 0 --
2006 New York Jets 16 100 66 34 6 2 1 0 9 9 9
2005 New York Jets 16 80 54 26 1 0 -- -- -- 0 --
2004 New York Jets 12 45 30 15 0 2 1 0 2 2 2
2003 New York Jets 16 56 38 18 2 0 1 0 26 26 26

Philanthropy[edit]

In 2006 Hobson and his wife L’Tesia started the Hobson & Hobson outreach in spring of 2006.[16] They have pledged millions to set up homes abroad including the United States for children and adults with special needs.[16]

Film entertainment[edit]

Hobson works at Amvic entertainment, founded in 2010, where he acts as a writer, producer, and director.[17][18] Most recently he was the Executive Producer for the new film “C’mon Man”, released on June 26, 2012.[18][19] Hobson and his wife are working on a motion picture adaptation of his wife’s book Soul Ties.[2]

Personal life[edit]

Hobson and his wife L’tesia Asensio Hobson reside in Beverly Hills.[2] They have seven children.[16]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Victor Hobson: Careerstats". Nfl.com. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c "Management Team". Amvicent.com. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "Victor Hobson Stats". ESPN. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "Victor Hobson Michigan Football Big 10". Lost Lettermen. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c "THE NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS". Patriots. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c Bradley & Crispino. "SJ Prep's Top 25 Athletes, 1980-2004". Tedsilary.com. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  7. ^ a b Marcia C. Smith (September 5, 1996). "This Could Be A Title Season For Hungry St. Joseph's Prep". Philly.com. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  8. ^ a b Sam Carchidi (December 15, 1997). "St. Joseph's Prep Lands Six On All-city Team Frankford Senior Eddie Gaskins Repeated As The Top Player. Lou D'alonzo Of Southern Was Named The Best Coach.". Philly.com. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  9. ^ Marcia C. Smith (January 27, 1998). "Hobson Tells The World: Michigan The St. Joseph's Prep Star Considered More Than 40 Division I Scholarship Offers.". Philly.com. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  10. ^ "The skinny on Victor Hobson". Scout.com. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  11. ^ "Victor Hobson Profile". NFL Draft Scout. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  12. ^ "Bobby DeAngelo Askew Jr.". Pro-Football Reference. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  13. ^ JUDY BATTISTA (May 5, 2003). "PRO FOOTBALL: JETS NOTEBOOK; Michigan Presence Felt at Training Camp". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  14. ^ "History". Nfl.com. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  15. ^ "Career Stats". Nfl.com. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  16. ^ a b c "Victor Hobson Biography". Find Best Biography. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  17. ^ "About:AmVic Entertainment". Amvicent.com. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  18. ^ a b "PRODUCERS". Amvicent.com. Retrieved 16 July 2013. 
  19. ^ "C'mon Man". Imdb.com. Retrieved 16 July 2013.