Víctor Manuel Vucetich

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This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Vucetich and the second or maternal family name is Rojas.
Víctor Manuel Vucetich
Víctor Manuel Vucetich.jpg
Personal information
Full name Víctor Manuel Vucetich Rojas
Date of birth (1955-06-25) 25 June 1955 (age 59)
Place of birth Tampico, Tamaulipas, Mexico
Playing position Defensive midfielder
Youth career
Universidad Nacional
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1978–1981 Atlante
1981–1983 Oaxtepec
Teams managed
1988–1989 Neza
1990–1993 León
1993–1995 Tecos UAG
1995–1996 UANL
1996–1997 Cruz Azul
1997–1998 Tecos UAG
1999 León
1999–2000 UANL
2001–2002 La Piedad
2002–2003 Puebla
2003–2004 Pachuca
2005–2006 Veracruz
2007 Chiapas
2009–2013 Monterrey
2013 Mexico
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Víctor Manuel Vucetich Rojas (born 25 June 1955) is a Mexican footballer and manager. A career spanning more than thirty years, Vucetich is one of the most decorated managers in Mexican football. He has coached ten teams in the Primera División, winning five league championships with four different clubs, two Copa México championships, an InterLiga championship and two second division titles. Vucetich has won thirteen of fourteen finals, having lost the final of the 2012 Clausura against Santos Laguna whilst managing Monterrey on May 20, 2012.

Due to his success, Vucetich has been given the nickname "Rey Midas", or "King Midas", by the Mexican media, referring to Midas, king of Phrygia, who according to Greek Mythology was given the ability to turn anything he touched into gold by Dionysus.

He will publish his first book -"Dios también está en tu Cancha"- at the end of 2014. [1]

He is of Serbian descent.

Managerial career[edit]

Mexico[edit]

In October 2010, Víctor Manuel Vucetich was identified as the most advanced of the candidates to fill the vacant post of the Mexico national football team, even receiving an official contact after several weeks of "scratching in the realm of speculation", as he called it. He ultimately ruled out the possibility of taking over the national team, citing commitments with then-employer Monterrey as well as personal reasons. In a statement, club officials said: "Monterrey reports that, Mr. Víctor Manuel Vucetich traveled to Mexico City for talks with officials of the Mexican Football Federation. This gathering, was like that which will be given to other managers who are part of the process launched by the Federation to define the next coach of the Mexican national team."[2] On October 16, Vucetich offered a press conference along with the Monterrey club directors to explain his role as a father, thus declining the opportunity to coach the national team, stating: "Yesterday evening is ultimately where I determined to step aside to avoid a larger problem for the federation, so that someone can give their full time to the national team. The reasons for which I have made this decision are personal and family related more than anything."

On September 12, 2013, a few days after leaving Monterrey, Vucetich was officially named coach of the Mexican national team.[3] He won his first match in charge, a vital 2-1 win over visiting Panama, which was Mexico's first victory at the Azteca in the final round of qualifications.

On October 17, two days after Mexico lost their match against Costa Rica, Vucetich was sacked, being replaced by Miguel Herrera. This occurred after the polemics that arose after the team's abysmal performance in their World Cup qualifying campaign, managing to reach the play-off against New Zealand due to the United States's 3–2 victory over Panama.

Honours[edit]

Managerial[edit]

Potros Neza
León
Tecos UAG
UANL
Cruz Azul
Pachuca
Monterrey

Individual[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Espn RadioFormula interview. November 19th,2014
  2. ^ "Monterrey admit Vuce-FMF Reunion". Mediotiempo. October 5, 2010. Retrieved October 5, 2010. 
  3. ^ http://www.fifa.com/worldfootball/news/newsid=2172919.html

External links[edit]