Victor de Laveleye

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Victor de Laveleye
Born Victor Auguste de Laveleye
(1894-11-05)5 November 1894
Brussels, Belgium
Died 14 December 1945(1945-12-14) (aged 51)
Elsene, Belgium
Nationality Belgium
Occupation politician

Victor Auguste de Laveleye (5 November 1894 – 14 December 1945) was a Belgian liberal politician and minister.[1] He also served as announcer on Radio Belgique during World War II.

De Laveleye was a doctor in law, and was municipality Council member of Sint-Gillis, President of the Liberal Party (1936–1937)[2] and Liberal member of parliament (1939–1945) for the district Brussels. De Laveleye was minister of justice (1937) and of public education (1944–1945). During World War II he was newsreader for Radio Belgique, a BBC station transmitted to occupied Belgium.

V sign[edit]

Main article: V sign

On 14 January 1941, he asked all Belgians to choose the letter "V" as a rallying sign, being the first letter of victoire (victory) in French and of vrijheid (freedom) in Dutch. This was the beginning of the "V campaign"" which saw "V" graffities on the walls of Belgium and later all of Europe and introduced the use of the "V sign" for victory and freedom.

English occultist Aleister Crowley is alleged to have privately suggested the V sign to de Laveleye for use as propaganda against the Nazi swastika.[citation needed]

Sports[edit]

He competed for Belgium in tennis at the 1920 and 1924 Summer Olympics.[3] He was nephew of Baron Edouard de Laveleye, chairman of the Belgian Olympic Committee.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Les méconnus de Londres: journal de guerre d'une Belge, 1940-1945 - Volume 1 - Page 189 Tinou Dutry-Soinne - 2006 "Il fut membre du Comité olympique belge et président de l'association belge du hockey. Petit-neveu d'Emile, neveu du baron Edouard de Laveleye. Il participa, pour la Belgique, à l'élaboration de la charte des Nations Unies à San Francisco ..."
  2. ^ "Presidents of the Belgian liberal party". Liberaal Archief (in Flemish). Retrieved 2010-06-11. 
  3. ^ "Victor de Laveleye Biography". Sports-reference.com. Retrieved 2010-06-11.