Victory Motorcycles

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Victory Motorcycles
Type Subsidiary
Industry Motorcycle
Founded 1997
Headquarters Spirit Lake, Iowa, USA
Parent Polaris Industries
Website www.victorymotorcycles.com

Victory Motorcycles is an American motorcycle manufacturer with its final assembly facility in Spirit Lake, Dickinson County, northern Iowa, United States. It began production of its vehicles in 1998.

Its parent company, Polaris Industries, created the firm following the modern success of Harley-Davidson. Victory's motorcycles are designed to compete directly with Harley-Davidson and similar American-style motorcycle brands, with V-twin engines and touring, sport-touring, and cruiser configurations. The first Victory, the V92C, was announced in 1997 and began selling in 1998. Victory has been modestly profitable since 2002.[1]

Background[edit]

Polaris, a Minnesota company with annual sales in 2012 of $3.2 billion, was one of the earliest manufacturers of snowmobiles. Polaris also manufactures ATVs, side-by-side off-road vehicles, electric vehicles and, until 2004, personal watercraft. Seeking to diversify its product line, and observing the sales enjoyed by Harley-Davidson and similar manufacturers, the company decided to produce a large motorcycle built entirely in the United States.[2]

Victory vehicles follow the traditional American style of a heavier motorcycle that increasingly became associated with the Harley-Davidson brand in economically advanced nations after the Second World War, rather than the more modern racing-inspired designs of Japanese and European manufacturers.

In 2010 Polaris engaged in a major expansion of production and marketing of the motorcycle. In 2011 Polaris bought the Indian motorcycle brand.[3]

Models[edit]

V92C[edit]

The first model, the V92C, was debuted at Planet Hollywood in the Mall of America by Al Unser, Jr. in 1997. Production began in late 1998, and the first official model year was 1999. At 92 cu in (1,510 cc), the V92C was the second largest production motorcycle engine available at the time, and sparked a race among motorcycle manufacturers to build bigger and bigger engines.[citation needed] All components for the V92C were manufactured in Minnesota and Iowa, except the Italian Brembo brakes and the British-made electronic fuel injection system. Victory engines debuted with five-speed transmissions (later six), single overhead cams, dual connecting rods, hydraulic lifters, and fuel injection; most fuel-injection components are standard GM parts. The V92C engine was designed to be easily tuned by the owner.

The 92 cubic inch Victory engine carries 6 US qt (5,700 ml) of oil in the sump, about the same as most automobiles. This is intended to minimize risk of low-oil damage, but also makes it dimensionally larger than other motorcycle engines, such as Harley-Davidson, which carry oil in tanks. The sheer volume of oil can also impede engine performance in a racing environment. Top speed is about 120 mph (190 km/h) at 5,500 rpm; the ECM contains a rev limiter which can be overridden by reprogramming the EPROM. The Victory engine is air-cooled, and also circulates crankcase oil through a cooler mounted between the front frame downtubes. A section of the rear swingarm can be removed to change the drive belt or the rear wheel.

The motorcycle's designers had approached several European manufacturers, particularly Cosworth, about designing and producing the engine, but ultimately decided to design and build it in Osceola, Wisconsin. Several variations on engine-frame geometry were tried until the best configuration was found, with the crankshaft geometrically aligned with the axles, a concept developed by Vincent Racing in the late 1950s.[citation needed] The V92C weighed about the same as a Harley, approximately 650 lb (290 kg). The original V92C engine produced about 55 hp (41 kW) at the wheel; with high-performance cams and pistons, this could be boosted to 83 hp (62 kW) and torque of 86 lb·ft (117 N·m).

In 2002, the Freedom Engine was introduced. It had the same dimensions as the old engine but higher power output, and with rounded cylinders and smaller oil cooler it was much more attractive visually. The V92C became known as the Classic Cruiser, and was phased out of the model lineup after the 2003 model year, but remains a favorite with Victory riders.[citation needed] There was also a Special Edition version featuring special upgrades in 2000 and 2001 model years, and Deluxe models for several years.

Victory motorcycle 2.jpg
Victory motorcycle.jpg

V92SC SportCruiser[edit]

Offered in 2000 and 2001, the V92SC SportCruiser offered higher ground clearance, adjustable via a simple 2-position bolt setup on the frame under the seat. It met a weaker than expected market, and did not sell well.

V92TC Touring Cruiser[edit]

Offered from 2002 through 2006, the TC featured a longer swingarm, large hard saddlebags, a re-designed seat, and sometimes the new Freedom Engine. The relatively tall seat height and roomy ergonomics made the bike ideal for larger riders. The Freedom Engine displaced 92 cu in (1,510 cc), but put out significantly more power and torque than the original engine. The 2002 model and later TC also accepted the 100 cu in (1,600 cc) big-bore kit, which increased torque further with the addition of upgraded exhaust. Later models featured rubber mounted handlebars and revised suspension settings. Deluxe versions (V92TCD) were also available with extra features popular at the time. With the deletion of the Touring Cruiser at the end of the 2006 model year, the last of the original V92 motorcycles was retired from the lineup.

Vegas[edit]

In 2003, Victory introduced the Vegas. The Vegas was designed by Victory designer Michael Song, and offered a totally new chassis design. The Freedom engine carried forward from the TC, but the rest of the bike incorporated new features. The Vegas debuted with the 92 cu in (1,510 cc) engine and 5-speed transmission, but was upgraded to a 100 cu in (1,600 cc) engine and 6-speed transmission for the 2006 model year. The Vegas Low has a 1 in (25 mm) lower seat, repositioned foot pegs, and handlebars 2 in (51 mm) further back than the regular Vegas model.[4]

The Vegas is considered part of Victory's Custom Cruisers.[5]

2010 Vegas Specs
100 cu in (1,600 cc) engine produces 85 hp (63 kW) and 106 lb·ft (144 N·m) torque
Engine: four-stroke 50° V-Twin
Fuel capacity: 4.5 US gal (17 l; 3.7 imp gal)
Fuel System: Electronic fuel injection with dual 45 mm throttle body
Primary Drive: Gear drive with torque compensator
Transmission: six-speed constant mesh
Final Drive: Carbon Fiber Reinforced Belt[6]

Vegas 8-Ball[edit]

The Vegas 8-Ball was powdercoated in black where the Vegas had been chromed. It debuted with the 92 cu in (1,510 cc) engine, and was upgraded to 100 cu in (1,600 cc) in 2006. Beginning with the 2011 model year, the Vegas 8-Ball received the 6 speed transmission from the standard Vegas.

The Vegas 8-Ball is considered part of Victory's 8-Ball Cruisers.[7]

2010 Vegas 8-Ball Specs
106 cu in (1,740 cc) engine produces 94 hp (70 kW) and 106 lb·ft (144 N·m) torque
Engine: four-stroke 50° V-Twin
Fuel capacity: 4.5 US gal (17 l; 3.7 imp gal)
Fuel System: Electronic Fuel Injection with dual 45 mm throttle body
Primary Drive: Gear drive with torque compensator
Transmission: five-speed constant mesh
Final Drive: Carbon Fiber Reinforced Belt[8]

High Ball[edit]

First introduced in 2012, is reminiscent of a bobber. It features apehanger handlebars, wire wheels and suede black & white paintwork with painted on logos rather than badges. For 2014 two options became available. The afore mentioned paint scheme came with Judge cast alloy rims. And a new paint scheme of suede black with red flames appeared, keeping the wire wheels. Both versions feature a Judge headlight, replacing the previous headlight, which many people felt looked out of place on this style of bike.

Gunner[edit]

Introduced in February of 2014 as a traditional "bobber" style of bike.

Kingpin/Kingpin Deluxe/Kingpin Tour[edit]

Following on the success of the Vegas, the Kingpin was released in 2004. Victory took advantage of the greater tuning capacity of cartridge forks, and revised both front and rear spring rates and damping to improve ride quality. The Kingpin Deluxe added luxury items to attract riders looking for more comfort. The Kingpin and Kingpin Deluxe began with the 92 cu in (1,510 cc) engine and five-speed transmission, but were upgraded to the 100 cu in (1,600 cc) engine and 6-speed transmission for the 2006 model year. For 2007 the Kingpin Tour was added, which was a Deluxe outfitted with an integrated tour pack or trunk. The Kingpin Tour was added when the Touring Cruiser was dropped.

The Kingpin is considered part of Victory's Custom Cruisers.[5]

2010 Kingpin Specs
100 cu in (1,600 cc) engine produces 85 hp (63 kW) and 106 lb·ft (144 N·m) torque
Engine: four-stroke 50° V-Twin
Fuel capacity: 4.5 US gal (17 l; 3.7 imp gal) | Fuel Capacity on 8-Ball: 4.5 US gal (17 l; 3.7 imp gal)
Fuel System: Electronic Fuel Injection with dual 45mm throttle body
Primary Drive: Gear drive with torque compensator
Transmission: six-speed constant mesh
Final Drive: Carbon Fiber Reinforced Belt

Kingpin 8-Ball[edit]

The Kingpin 8-Ball is based upon the Kingpin platform, and like the Vegas 8-Ball is black, with black highlights in place of the chrome highlights of the standard Kingpin Model. It carries the 100 cu in (1,600 cc) motor, and has a 5 speed gearbox. It is considered to be a "blank canvas" and thus is popular with motorcycle customizers.

The Kingpin 8-Ball is considered part of Victory's 8-Ball Cruisers.[7]

2010 Kingpin 8-Ball Specs
100 cu in (1,600 cc) engine produces 85 hp (63 kW) and 106 lb·ft (144 N·m) of torque
Engine: four-stroke 50° V-Twin
Fuel capacity: 4.5 US gal (17 l; 3.7 imp gal)
Fuel System: Electronic Fuel Injection with dual 45mm throttle body
Primary Drive: Gear drive with torque compensator
Transmission: five-speed constant mesh
Final Drive: Carbon Fiber Reinforced Belt[9]

Hammer[edit]

Introduced in 2005, The Hammer is considered part of Victory's Muscle Cruisers.[10]

2010 Hammer/Hammer Sl Specs
106 cu in (1,740 cc) engine produces 97 hp (72 kW) and 113 lb·ft (153 N·m) torque
Engine: four-stroke 50° V-Twin
Fuel capacity: 4.5 US gal (17 l; 3.7 imp gal)
Fuel System: Electronic Fuel Injection with dual 45mm throttle body
Primary Drive: Gear drive with torque compensator
Transmission: six-speed constant mesh
Final Drive: Carbon Fiber Reinforced Belt

Hammer 8-Ball[edit]

Victory Hammer Eight-Ball

In 2010, Victory released the Hammer 8-ball. With a lowered seat and smaller engine the bike is marketed as a cheaper and less loaded alternative to the Hammer and the Hammer S. It was one of the few bikes in Victory's lineup that remained a 5-speed.[11] The 2011 model was upgraded to the 106 cu inch engine and 6 speed gearbox[12]

The Hammer 8-Ball is considered part of Victory's 8-Ball Cruisers.[7]

2010 Hammer 8-Ball Specs
100 cu in (1,600 cc) engine produces 85 hp (63 kW) and 106 lb·ft (144 N·m) torque
Engine: four-stroke 50° V-Twin
Fuel capacity: 4.5 US gal (17 l; 3.7 imp gal)
Fuel System: Electronic Fuel Injection with dual 45mm throttle body
Primary Drive: Gear drive with torque compensator
Transmission: five-speed constant mesh
Final Drive: Carbon Fiber Reinforced Belt
2012 Hammer 8-Ball Specs
106 cu in (1,740 cc) engine produces 97 hp (72 kW) and 113 lb·ft (153 N·m) torque
Fuel capacity: 4.5 US gal (17 l; 3.7 imp gal)
Fuel System: Electronic Fuel Injection with dual 45mm throttle body
Primary Drive: Gear drive with torque compensator
Transmission: six-speed constant mesh
Final Drive: Carbon Fiber Reinforced Belt

Vegas Jackpot[edit]

Debuting in 2006, the Jackpot is, in Victory's own words, an "extreme custom." It features the 100 cu in (1,600 cc) Freedom V-Twin engine and 6-speed transmission (later bikes feature the 106 cu in), a 250 mm rear tire, a color-matched frame and extensive custom styling with bold paint schemes. It is designed to be Victory's top-of-the-line custom.[13]

Victory Jackpot (2010)

The Vegas Jackpot is considered part of Victory's Muscle Cruisers.[10]

2010 Vegas Jackpot Specs
106 cu in (1,740 cc) engine produces 97 hp (72 kW) and 113 lb·ft (153 N·m) torque
Engine: four-stroke 50° V-Twin
Fuel capacity: 4.5 US gal (17 l; 3.7 imp gal)
Fuel System: Electronic Fuel Injection with dual 45mm throttle body
Primary Drive: Gear drive with torque compensator
Transmission: six-speed constant mesh
Final Drive: Carbon Fiber Reinforced Belt[14]

Ness Signature Series[edit]

Motorcycle customizer Arlen Ness and his son Cory Ness teamed with Victory in 2003 to create a limited-edition model based on the Vegas. The bikes they developed used many Ness aftermarket billet aluminum accessories, custom paint schemes and their signatures on the side panels. In 2005, they added the Kingpin to the lineup. In 2006, the Jackpot was the basis for the Ness Signature Series. It featured many chrome accessories, a custom seat built by Danny Gray, custom billet aluminum wheels, and the signatures of Arlen and Cory Ness on the side panels. For 2007, the Ness Signature Series is based on the Jackpot.

In 2010 Arlen Ness and Cory Ness created two more limited-edition Victorys; The Arlen Ness Vision and the Cory Ness Jackpot.[15] Created as limited editions the bikes have custom paint & wheels, Ness chrome, diamond-cut engine heads, and are numbered and signed.[16] Aside from the custom work the two bikes have the same specs as their non-limited edition cousins.

Vision Street and Vision Tour[edit]

Victory Vision Tour

Introduced in February 2007 as an addition to the 2008 lineup, the Vision is a touring configuration. It comes in two versions, the Street, which includes a full fairing and hard saddlebags; and the Tour, which also has a hard trunk. The Vision offers a low seat height and a wide range of luxury electronics.[17] In 2010 Victory changed the Street version to an 8-Ball.[18]

2010 Vision Specs
106 cu in (1,740 cc) engine produces 92 hp (69 kW) and 109 lb·ft (148 N·m) torque
Engine: four-stroke 50° V-Twin
Fuel capacity: 6 US gal (23 l; 5.0 imp gal)
Fuel System: Electronic Fuel Injection with dual 45mm throttle body
Primary Drive: Gear drive with torque compensator
Transmission: six-speed constant mesh
Final Drive: Carbon Fiber Reinforced Belt

Vision 8-Ball[edit]

The Kingpin 8-Ball is considered part of Victory's 8-Ball Cruisers.[7]

2010 Vision 8-Ball Specs
106 cu in (1,740 cc) engine produces 97 hp (72 kW) and 109 lb·ft (148 N·m) torque
Engine: four-stroke 50° V-Twin
Fuel capacity: 6 US gal (23 l; 5.0 imp gal)
Fuel System: Electronic Fuel Injection with dual 45 mm throttle body
Primary Drive: Gear drive with torque compensator
Transmission: six-speed constant mesh
Final Drive: Carbon Fiber Reinforced Belt

Cross Country[edit]

New for 2010, the Victory Cross Country Motorcycle is a hard-bagger cruiser with a handlebar mounted fairing. It has a Freedom V-Twin Engine, 21 gallons of cargo capacity, 4.7 inches of suspension travel, floorboards, cruise control and an MP3-compatible sound system.[19]

Specs
106 cu in (1,740 cc) engine produces 92 hp (69 kW) and 109 lb·ft (148 N·m) torque
Engine: four-stroke 50° V-Twin
Fuel capacity: 5.8 US gal (22 l; 4.8 imp gal)
Fuel System: Electronic Fuel Injection with dual 45 mm throttle body
Primary Drive: Gear drive with torque compensator
Transmission: six-speed constant mesh
Final Drive: Carbon Fiber Reinforced Belt[20]

Cross Roads[edit]

New for 2010, the Victory Cross Roads Motorcycle, had the most horsepower and cargo capacity in its class. Its 106-cubic-inch Freedom V-Twin Engine and 21 gallons of cargo capacity, cruiser styling, comfortable seating, a wind-blocking windshield - were designed to give the rider "an appetite for the open road."[21]

Specs
106 cu in (1,740 cc) engine produces 92 hp (69 kW) and 109 lb·ft (148 N·m) torque
Engine: four-stroke 50° V-Twin
Fuel capacity: 5.8 US gal (22 l; 4.8 imp gal)
Fuel System: Electronic Fuel Injection with dual 45mm throttle body
Primary Drive: Gear drive with torque compensator
Transmission: six-speed constant mesh
Final Drive: Carbon Fiber Reinforced Belt[22]

Judge[edit]

New for 2012, the Victory Judge Motorcycle is sport cruiser with a 106-cubic-inch Freedom V-Twin Engine, muscle car inspired styling and mid mounted controls.[23]

Specs
106 cu in (1,740 cc) engine produces 110 lb·ft (150 N·m) torque
Engine: four-stroke 50° V-Twin
Fuel capacity: 5 US gal (19 l; 4.2 imp gal)
Fuel System: Electronic Fuel Injection with dual 45mm throttle body
Primary Drive: Gear drive with torque compensator
Transmission: six-speed overdrive constant mesh
Final Drive: Carbon Fiber Reinforced Belt[24]

8-Ball versions[edit]

There are five bikes that come in 8-Ball versions: Hammer, Vegas, Kingpin, Vision, and Cross Country. 8-Balls come in one color and have a lower retail price tag. The bikes are basically the same as their counterparts but generally come with fewer add-ons. Example: The Vision 8-Ball does not come with the passenger backrest/trunk.[7] The 8-Ball versions of the bikes are also lower or have a lower seat.

Marketing contest[edit]

In 2010 Victory marketing manager Josh Kurcinka announced a contest in which ten people won a lease on one of the two new Victory touring bikes: Cross Country or Cross Roads. The entrants had submitted a 90-second video explaining why they deserved a lease on a new bike and what they had planned for the summer. Contestants were asked to outline four different and do-able road trips. Victory judged the entries based on plausibility of trips, content and originality. Submissions were taken online and at Industry Trade Shows like the New York International Motorcycle Show. Beginning in May 2010, winning riders began taking a series of road trips each month through August 2010 from two to five days each. Riders documented their experiences through blogs, videos and photos sharing both their reviews of the bikes and the sites they visit along the way.[25][26]

Owners' clubs[edit]

The Victory Motorcycle Club is an independent, not-for-profit group of Victory motorcycle owners and enthusiasts that began in 1998 as a Yahoo online chat site by several owners of Victory Motorcycles. The club has grown from a small group of enthusiasts to an international club with more than 2,700 paid members and 11,000 guests in the United States, Canada, Great Britain and Germany. As of July 2010 there are 61 local chapters.[27]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Victory Motorcycle sales increase 83% during first quarter". Buyausedmotorcycle.com: Buy a Used Motorcycle Blog – Motorcycle News and Information. 2010-04-21. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  2. ^ "Unknown (dead link)". American Motorcyclist Association. [dead link]
  3. ^ Polaris Industries (19 April 2011). "Polaris Industries Acquires Indian Motorcycles" (Press release). 
  4. ^ 08 Victory Vegas Low, Polaris Industries, 2008, retrieved 2010-07-03 [dead link]
  5. ^ a b "Victory 2010 Custom Cruiser Motorcycles Custom V-Twin Motorcycles". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  6. ^ "2010 Victory Vegas Motorcycle : Specs". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  7. ^ a b c d e "Victory 2010 8 Ball Cruiser Motorcycles: V-Twin Motorcycles". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  8. ^ "2010 Victory Vegas 8-Ball Motorcycle : Specs". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  9. ^ "2010 Victory Kingpin 8-Ball Motorcycle : Specs". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  10. ^ a b "Victory 2010 Muscle Cruiser Motorcycles Wide-Tire V-Twin Cruisers". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  11. ^ "2010 Victory Hammer 8-Ball Motorcycle : Features". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  12. ^ 2012 hammer-8-ball specifications Victorymotorcycles.com Retrieved 2013-01-07
  13. ^ "Victory 2010 Jackpot Custom Cruisers: Custom V-Twin Cruisers". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  14. ^ "2010 Victory Jackpot Motorcycle : Specs". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  15. ^ "2010 Victory Ness Signature Motorcycles : Overview". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  16. ^ "2010 Arlen Ness Victory Vision Motorcycle : Overview". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  17. ^ "Victory 2010 Motorcycles: Vision Tour: Luxury, V-Twin Touring". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  18. ^ "Victory 2010 Vision 8 Ball Cruiser: V-Twin Cruiser Motorcycle". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  19. ^ "Victory 2010 Motorcycles: Cross Country Touring Motorcycle". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  20. ^ "2010 Victory Touring Motorcycles : Specs". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  21. ^ "Victory 2010 Motorcycles: Cross Roads Touring Motorcycle". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  22. ^ "2010 Victory Touring Motorcycles : Specs". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  23. ^ "Victory Motorcycles: Judge". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2013-03-24. 
  24. ^ "2013 Victory Judge : Specs". Polarisindustries.com. Retrieved 2013-03-24. 
  25. ^ "Victory Motorcycles". True American Road Trip. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  26. ^ "Sheppard heads out on the highway". Folsom Telegraph. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  27. ^ "Local Chapters". Victory Motorcycle Club. Retrieved 6 July 2010. 

External links[edit]