Victricius

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Saint Victricius
Saint Victrice.JPG
Bishop
Born ~330 AD
Died ~407 AD
Honored in Roman Catholic Church
Feast August 7

Saint Victricius (French: Victrice; Italian: Vittricio) (c. 330 – c. 407 AD) was a bishop of Rouen (393–407), missionary, and author. His feast day is August 7. Victricius was the son of a Roman legionnaire, and was in the army himself. However, when he became a Christian, he refused to remain in the army. He was flogged and sentenced for execution, but managed to avoid being executed. He proselytized amongst the tribes of Flanders, Hainault, and Brabant.

He became bishop of Rouen around 386 or 393. He was invited to Britain in 396 to assist in the settlement of some dispute among the bishops there. He was accused of heresy but was defended by Pope Innocent I and received from Innocent the important decretal of the Liber Regularum.

In 396 relics of Vitalis and Agricola were sent to Victricius, and about the same date to St. Paulinus of Nola and others.[1]

Victricius wrote The Praise of Saints (De Laude Sanctorum).

References[edit]

  1. ^ CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Sts. Vitalis and Agricola

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gillian Clark, "Victricius of Rouen: Praising the Saints (Introduction and annotated translation)," Journal of Early Christian Studies, 7 (1999), 365-399; = in Eadem, Body and Gender, Soul and Reason in Late Antiquity (Farnham; Burlington, VT, Ashgate, 2011) (Variorum collected studies series, CS978), art. XII.
  • Gillian Clark, "Translating relics: Victricius of Rouen and fourth-century debate," Early Medieval Europe, 10 (2001), 161–176; in Eadem, Body and Gender, Soul and Reason in Late Antiquity (Farnham; Burlington, VT, Ashgate, 2011) (Variorum collected studies series, CS978), art. XIII.

External links[edit]