Vienna (film)

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Vienna
Directed by Orson Welles
Starring Orson Welles
Arte Johnson
Mickey Rooney
Senta Berger
Release dates 1968
Running time 8 minutes (incomplete)
Language English

Vienna (also known as Orson Welles' Vienna[1] or Spying in Vienna[2]) is a 1968 short film directed by Orson Welles. It was originally produced as part of his abandoned television special, Orson's Bag, which was made for CBS; but in 1969, with the project close to completion, CBS withdrew their funding over Welles' long-running disputes with US authorities regarding his tax status. The film remained uncompleted.[1] Despite its name, Vienna freely mixes footage shot in Vienna, Zagreb, and in a Los Angeles studio.[1] The 8-minute segment was restored by the Munich Film Museum in 1999.[1]

Plot[edit]

Vienna is an eclectic blend of faux-documentary and comical skits. Welles presents a leisurely guided tour of "Vienna," commenting on the city and its inhabitants.[2] He visits the Sacher Hotel, and the Wiener Riesenrad (Great Wheel) at the Prater amusement park,[2] both of which appeared in the 1949 film The Third Man, in which Welles had a starring role. Peter Bogdanovich, disguised in a trench coat and dark glasses, appears as Welles' magician assistant.[1] The film concludes with a spy film spoof, as Welles becomes involved in the abduction of "the most beautiful woman in Vienna" (Senta Berger),[1] the kidnapper portrayed by Mickey Rooney.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g McBride, Joseph (2006) What ever happened to Orson Welles?: a portrait of an independent career, University Press of Kentucky, p233-4
  2. ^ a b c Brigitte Timmermann, The Third Man's Vienna - Celebrating a Film Classic, Shippen Rock Publishing, p271

External links[edit]